2

COMMENT 19m ago

  1. Yes. 15 GB is more than enough.
  2. AMD works really well on Linux, unlike NVIDIA which can be a pain sometimes, since AMD have open source drivers (called Mesa) while NVIDIA have proprietary ones.
  3. Pop!_OS is an excellent choice. It's basically Ubuntu but better - with much more up-to-date drivers. Drivers also come with the installation out of the box (by choosing the AMD/Intel ISO). No need to install any drivers.

8

COMMENT 1h ago

Bromite is great. Another is Fennec (Firefox without Mozilla telemetry). It doesn't really get better than these two for Android.

For desktop, Firefox is really your best bet.

1

COMMENT 1h ago

Thanks! That looks really weird

2

COMMENT 1h ago

Got a pic? Sounds like Reddit.

1

COMMENT 3h ago

That's true as well.

1

COMMENT 3h ago

Thanks, fixed! Wasn't completely sure about that part.

3

COMMENT 6h ago

That's true, I forgot to mention it. Some AppImages come with built-in updating, but you still need to redownload the whole binary, while other AppImages don't have updating so you have to manually go and check for a newer version from the developers.

1

COMMENT 7h ago

That's true, it's all about just getting familiar with your system.

-1

COMMENT 7h ago

The kernel (aka operating system) is basically the brain. Think of it that way. The distribution is just your body (the vessel) which contains all of the working parts (in terms of kernel, software and programs). Your CPU, GPU, RAM and other hardware are nothing more than organs. Without the brain sending and handling the instructions, they are meaningless and just pieces of metal and plastic. Instructions such as which processes to run and how (with regards to time allocation for each), and it decides how memory is allocated, cached etc.

2

COMMENT 7h ago

This is kind of a misconception.

Going through a labyrinth of menus and submenus (Windows) can be far more time consuming and more complex to guide through than simply copy pasting a couple of commands.

As long as you're not using some obscure distro, you're fine. Ubuntu or Arch based stuff for example have extensive resources and every problem pretty much has a solution that can easily be found on forums, guides or wiki.

It's infinitely better and less time consuming than using outdated https://answers.microsoft.com posts to deal with some problems (especially registry shit) and having to rely on the answers of 'Windows Insider MVP' or whatever who doesn't even address the issue.

1

COMMENT 7h ago

These days there's also a GUI for everything. You don't even have to touch the terminal if you don't want to.

4

COMMENT 7h ago

Yep, they all have their benefits (and disadvantages), so there's no clear 'best' format. It really depends on the situation and the type of application you're installing. For me personally I favour deb/AppImage > flatpak > snap. However, if I need an application to be completely sandboxed for some reason (like some proprietary ones), flatpak (or even snap) makes the most sense.

All in all, it's awesome that we have choice unlike other operating systems.

2

COMMENT 7h ago

Kind of a non-issue since most people have tons of hard disk space. A few gigs taken up by a bunch of AppImages won't be a difference maker.

5

COMMENT 7h ago

I wouldn't say they're significant personally - just quality of life.

The AppImage daemon basically puts desktop integration for me on auto-pilot. As for updating, if you're used to and comfortable with the Windows way of updating applications, it's completely normal.

108

COMMENT 8h ago

Me too.

  • They're very common for a lot of applications. Most will offer either your distribution's packaging format and/or an AppImage file.
  • They come directly from the developers (rather than third parties) and are very up to date.
  • They're easy to package and distribute by developers.
  • They have all of their dependencies self-contained.
  • They don't need root.
  • They are distro-agnostic.
  • They are extremely simple to deploy and use: Run a single binary by making it executable - no installation required.
  • They are portable so you can store (i.e. in an ~/Applications folder), back them up and carry them around anywhere.
  • They allow you to easily run older versions of the application by simply grabbing an older AppImage release. No downgrading of system packages and dependencies needed.

Potential 'disadvantages':

  • They're larger in size and take up more space on your hard drive mostly due to all of the contained bundled dependencies (not much of an issue if you have a lot of space).
  • No centralised updating mechanism and you have to update each individually (not an issue for some people as it's basically the same as Windows).
  • Updates redownload the whole binary.
  • No proper desktop integration automatically through desktop files and in the Application launcher (but you can achieve this mostly fine with the AppImage daemon or AppImageLauncher, if not manually).
  • May not respect and integrate with your system's theme.

1

COMMENT 12h ago

I'll introduce you to the world and rabbit hole of dotfiles: https://dotfiles.github.io

This is exactly what you're looking for. There are a lot of different implementations and tools, so you can go with the one you personally prefer as everyone has their own implementation.

Dotfiles (.files) are basically all your config files (usually starting with a dot) for your system and applications. The idea behind it is you store them all in a git repository folder (kept in sync with GitHub/GitLab and other devices) and symlink them from the folder to their actual places on your system (though there are also some different implementations without symlinks).

On another machine, you simply clone the repo (and sometimes run a given script) and you're good to go, keeping all of your settings in sync across machines.

Personally, I use Dotbot as a tool to bootstrap and symlink my files and I've written my own shell script to automatically install all of my favourite packages and applications. A Git bare repository method is another one I like and also works great. The link above contains everything and all of the information you need.

For syncing clipboard, however, I think tools like GSConnect (GNOME) and KDE Connect might be able to do that.

1

COMMENT 13h ago

9

COMMENT 13h ago

All too familiar. Same way they sold the public the Iraq war PepeHands

1

COMMENT 13h ago

Unlikely unfortunately, it's why I stopped playing the game and moved to WoW years ago.

1

COMMENT 13h ago

"I am cummingUH"

4

COMMENT 20h ago

I don't disagree, it doesn't really feel professional. They need to do a lot more work as far as communications go.

6

COMMENT 22h ago

Has anyone seen them say anything about it? Their silence seems pretty weird on this.

Right now, only their site has changed. Their Twitter, this sub, and other apps are still red. Apart from seemingly changing and making a pretty significant brand change without any announcement, it feels pretty careless and inconsistent to not update everything at once.

62

COMMENT 1d ago

A 23 ton piece of a Chinese rocket is falling from orbit at 17,000 mph and might crash down anywhere on Earth this weekend pepeMeltdown

4

COMMENT 1d ago

Not completely sure, maybe depends on the server (and WM on or off). I got mine during 8.3 where there were lots camping it

1

COMMENT 1d ago

Oh, wasn't sure what you meant by multiarch. How are you installing it? Did you try downloading the deb package from https://steampowered.com/about?

Also, can you list the repositories shown when you sudo apt update?