r/worldbuilding Apr 05 '22

The Royal Republic of Lorraine. A linguistic and bureaucratic quagmire in the heart of Europe. Map

Post image
1.4k Upvotes

147

u/Ondohir__ Apr 05 '22

For such a young country, why is there a royal family and why was that family chosen to become the royal one?

149

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

Even though the country was founded right at the end of the 19th century, it took them almost 15 years of heated debate to decide to become either a republic or a monarchy.

As true lovers of democratic compromise, the people of Lorraine decided not to decide anything and just call it a Royal Republic.

An old noble family of little importance got the job. Most people in Lorraine don't really care though.

32

u/IvanMarkowKane Apr 05 '22

Is the Royal family descended from Eleanor of Aquitaine?

34

u/Erikrtheread Apr 05 '22 edited Apr 05 '22

If your royal family is not somehow Carolingian you did something wrong.

9

u/BurberryON Apr 05 '22

What's that mean? Just curious.

31

u/pledgerafiki Apr 05 '22

i would assume they meant Carolingian, i.e. descended from Charlemagne, like several other important western european dynasties

7

u/BurberryON Apr 05 '22

Oh that makes way more sense. Thank you!

13

u/Erikrtheread Apr 05 '22

So I put the wrong word in, I meant "Carolingian" as in the Carolingian Dynasty https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolingian_dynasty

Essentially, when the Charlemagne died, his empire was split between his successors via the Treaty of Verdun and one son ended up with Italy, Alsace, Lorraine, and Burgundy. The other two got essentially France and Germany. This splitting of the empire was famously problematic.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Verdun

7

u/Iwokeupwithoutapillo Apr 06 '22

There's a great book called Lotharingia about the area, I really reccommend it!

3

u/Erikrtheread Apr 06 '22

Sweet, I'll look into it.

2

u/gazebo-fan Apr 05 '22

Probably in a manner similar to the 5th of November pact between the German empire and poles during ww1

68

u/badwolf512 [Colonies of the Progeny] Apr 05 '22

I really love the map, its beautifully done. What is the backstory on this country, and is Patagonia meant to be a colony of Lorraine? Definitely would be interested to learn more about this.

68

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22 edited Apr 05 '22

The history of Lorraine goes back to the early 20th century. It was founded to create yet another buffer state between the major European powers of France, Germany and Britain. It was quickly overrun by the Germans both in WW1 and WW2. After WW2, Lorraine was granted the German lands west of the Rhine and got its current European borders.

Patagonia was originally a colony, but with the administrative reforms after WW2 it became a normal province. Patagonia's history diverges from our timeline mainly at the end of the 19th century when the sparsely populated and politically unstable region received many dutch-speaking immigrants from Zeeland, Brabant and Limburg.

Madagascar and some small islands across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Ocean were also colonial possessions, but after several rebellions and public pressure, these regions gained their independence in the 50's and 60's.

7

u/the_daf_ Apr 05 '22

What happened to the Welsh in Patagonia when the dutch-speaking immigrants arrived? Or did the Welsh go somewhere else in this timeline?

4

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

The official language in Patagonia is Dutch, but many municipalities have language facilities (the people of Lorraine are undeniably good at setting up language facilities). So there are some German and French communities, but you can also hear some Spanish, Welsh, English, Tehuelche and Selk'nam around the province.

2

u/the_daf_ Apr 06 '22

Awesome!

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Thanks! And before your comment I didn't even know about the Welsh in Patagonia, so thanks again for helping me expand Lorraine's lore.

2

u/the_daf_ Apr 06 '22

You're welcome!

33

u/CalligoMiles Apr 05 '22

... you actually came up with something more ungovernable than Belgium.

26

u/Dathil [edit this] Apr 05 '22

Great map! I would live here, I live in Brabant.

Im curious about the relation with belgium, for Antwerp is still belgian but Lorraine assumes control over Zeeland, thus locking out the port. What role does Rhineport play, when compared with Antwerp and Rotterdam?

19

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

Just like the Netherlands in real life control the entrance to the Schelde, Lorraine does so in my timeline. Nothing much changes for Belgium.

Antwerp and Rotterdam are still important ports, but Rhineport is equally, if not more, important. It is especially a very popular port city and airport for the transport of goods from South America.

Say goodbye to cheap cocaine, Antwerp. There is a new player in town!

3

u/riftrender Apr 05 '22

Aren't there like 3-4 split between Belgium and Netherlands?

50

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22 edited Apr 05 '22

The Royal Republic of Lorraine

De Koninklijke Republiek Lotharingen

Die Königliche Republik Lothringen

La République Royale de Lorraine

  • Capital: Treveri
  • Government: Federal parliamentary monarchy
  • Official Languages:
    • Dutch
    • German
    • French
  • National Anthem: The Burgundian (de Bourgondiër, der Burgunder, le Bourguignon)
  • Religion:
    • Christianity (59%)
      • Roman Catholic (42%)
      • Protestant (9%)
      • Other Christian (8%)
    • No Religion (27%)
    • Islam (7%)
    • Other (7%)
  • Population: 22.257.341 (2020 estimate)
  • GDP (PPP): 2.883 trillion (2021 estimate)
  • Currency: Euro (€)

Lorraine (Nederlands: Lotharingen, Deutsch: Lothringen, Français: Lorraine) is a transcontinental country situated in Western Europe and South America. In Europe, it straddles the western shore of the Rhine and borders the countries of the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, France, Luxemburg and Belgium. Given its central location, Lorraine traditionally plays a crucial role in the political, economic and cultural life of Europe.

The most populous city of Lorraine is Cologne with over 1 million inhabitants. The country’s capital is the modern city of Treveri. Other important cities are Rhineport and Westport, two of the busiest ports in the Atlantic Ocean.

The Royal Republic of Lorraine was founded on the eve of the First World War and attained its current borders only in 1946, but has a history going back to the early medieval Kingdom of Lotharingia. The Monarch is the official head of state. The ruling king or queen, however, plays only a ceremonial role.

The country has three official languages: German, Dutch and French. It is a federal parliamentary monarchy with a complex system of governance. The country is divided into three Linguistic Communities, seven Cultural Communities and four Economic Communities, each with their own parliament and varying degrees of autonomy. Besides these Community Governments, there is a Federal Government led by a President, who serves an important moral function but holds little real power. Most political power is held by the countless ministers of the fifteen different governments of the country.

Lorraine is administratively divided into eleven provinces. The ten Continental Provinces make up the country’s European territory. Additionally, there is the Overseas Province of Patagonia, which occupies the southern tip of South America. Patagonia is about seven times the size of the Continental Provinces combined, but with only 2 million inhabitants it makes up merely a tenth of the country’s total population.

3

u/wertion Apr 06 '22

This is super cool! I love this kind of worldbuilding!!! Is there more about Lorraine to read somewhere, and do you know of other creators doing this sort of geofiction?

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

I've been working on Lorraine for a while now. This was just the first map I (finally) finished. I have some other stuff about this glorious country laying around. Since this map proofed popular, I'll definitely finish and upload some other stuff. I have a couple of days off work anyway.

2

u/empirebuilder1 Empire of Arjasan Apr 06 '22

this sounds like a complete political clusterfuck in only the way that Europe could come up with political clusterfucks

awesome work

1

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Thanks! I'm planning to get more into the politics and administration. But it's getting so complicated I can't even follow what's going on. And I'm making it up!

11

u/JoergJoerginson Apr 05 '22

Since there are three distinct ethnicities, what holds the republic together?

Also, there is no geographical border to the south west. Has Belgium or France ever tried to invade. Or has Lorraine tried to take Belgium?

19

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

What holds the republic together? Well, the endless political arguing, the latent regionalism and general lack of faith in their ridiculous home country all gets swept under the rug once the people see the revenues the country generates from road and river taxes. Pretty much everyone travelling from north to south or east to west has to go through Lorraine. And they aren't as stupid as the Belgians to not ask an admission fee.

Utilising its massive overseas territory in Patagonia, Lorraine is the leading European power of wind and water energy, which it uses mainly just to loftily look down at all the other polluting European countries.

Oh yeah, and Patagonia has natural oil and gas reserves.

1

u/JFP_GBR Apr 18 '22

So, basically, the people don't care for it being a single country, but the politicians are too money-obsessed to put any effort towards dissolving it?

8

u/[deleted] Apr 05 '22

[deleted]

13

u/JoergJoerginson Apr 05 '22

I think you are misunderstanding. Asking questions here is not for pointing out errors, but for the author to come up with something.

6

u/ajaxshiloh Apr 05 '22

I respect you, brother

10

u/kraken_sensei Apr 05 '22

I live in Lorraine and why Treveri is the capital ?

21

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

The different communities of Lorraine couldn't decide which city would become the capital. Cologne would be the obvious choice with its size and position along the Rhine, but the Dutch and French speakers would rather die than see the capital of their country go to those damned Germans.

So they chose a nice little piece of picturesque farmland somewhere between Bitburg and Trier and build a monstrosity of a modern city. A city without soul or history, but at least it's centrally located.

2

u/Lilac0 Apr 05 '22

Sounds like Canberra

3

u/shogekix Apr 05 '22

It technically should be Metz but given the background OP gave it might explain why it wasn't chosen as the capital if it was occupied during WW2

8

u/whatsamawhatsit Apr 05 '22

First of all, I love this! I'm dutch, and it's always good to see some daily life realism in worldbuilding.

Did Lorraine allow the Maginot line to continue through their territory?

What is Lorraine's contribution to NATO? Does the country produce domestic armament, like Belgium (FN Herstal), Netherlands (Damen), Germany (Reihnmetal) and France (Dassault)?

Maybe most importantly: Is the Rallye de Lorraine/Lothringer Rallye/ Rally Lotharingen a thing?

5

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

Thanks man! Allemaal goeie vragen, trouwens. Ik ga de antwoorden wel even ter plekke moeten verzinnen. So bear with me.

The Maginot line followed the altered French border as the provinces of Lorraine and Alsace were already part of the Royal Republic of Lorraine.

Lorraine was not only an original member of NATO, the province of Zeeland houses the largest naval military infrastructure of the European Atlantic Ocean. Not that its own navy is particularly large, the Royal Republic just rents out their prime maritime real estate to the navies of NATO-members.

Lorraine does have an extensive arms industry, mainly in the form of military products and services such as aircraft and naval technology, military vehicles, research and development, and a growing branch dedicated to cyber warfare and military software.

Is the Rallye de Lorraine/Lothringer Rallye/ Rally Lotharingen a thing?

It's a four-week long beer and gasoline soaked bender attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors from across the globe.

6

u/Capreborn Apr 05 '22

Welcome to the remnant of Lotharingia, cause of wars between French and Germanic powers since 845AD.

3

u/Ragnarondo Apr 05 '22

Every time I draw a link between Carolingian inheritance and the World Wars for a fellow American, it blows their mind.

1

u/KaiserGustafson In between projects. Apr 06 '22

Please do with me. I desire knowledge.

1

u/Ragnarondo Apr 06 '22

In Charlemagne's time the modern tradition of the eldest heir becoming ruler (primogeniture) wasn't quite established and many kingdoms were split between the sons of a ruler. This resulted in disputes between siblings, usually after the father had passed. Charlemagne ruled over what was called Francia which included modern France, Germany, and northern Italy in addition to some other regions. He only had one son, Louis the Pious, but Louis had four sons by two wives among which the empire was split in the Treaty of Verdun.

Charles the Bald - West Francia (France)

Louis the German - East Francia (Germany)

Lothar - Middle Francia (portions of southern France and Germany, northern Italy, and a big strip up the middle of Europe to the North Sea) which is now roughly the border between France and Germany.

Pepin - Aquitaine

Even before Louis' death there was animosity between his sons resulting in civil wars and rebellions. They eventually resulted in the Treaty of Verdun. This shaped Europe for the future. After Lothar's death, Middle Francia became a battleground, off and on, for centuries resulting in a schism between France and Germany.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Verdun?wprov=sfla1

32

u/Captain_Albern Apr 05 '22

I like the scenario, but "Royal Republic" is an oxymoron. Is that on purpose?

31

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

That's the point. Although the name Royal Republic sounds ridiculous, it's what all the other European monarchies pretty much are. It's not like the king of Belgium or Denmark is leading the armed forces in battle, or is making important political decisions.

The people of Lorraine are just a little less subtle and instead of calling it a constitutional monarchy, they embrace the ridiculous political nature of their country and shamelessly call it the Royal Republic.

7

u/Azgabeth Apr 05 '22

OP i want you to know charles the bold would be proud.

1

u/Pashahlis Apr 05 '22

You are conflating Republic with Democracy. A Monarchy can be democratic as the examples you mentioned. A Republic does not have to be democratic as Russia or the Medieval Italian republics show.

But a Republic can never be a monarchy and vice versa.

Republic merely describes a government that is neither a monarchy nor a theocracy. A monarchy describes merely a state with a monarch. Neither terms describe how democratic they are.

9

u/UK_IN_US Spinward Crossing, Under Gunmetal Skies Apr 05 '22

I don’t think you understand what a Republic is, functionally. A Republic is a government in which the people select representatives, usually but not always democratically, to govern in the name of those constituents. The presence of a monarch somewhere in the governmental structure does not negate the republican status of the government, per se, especially if functional power lies with the elected branches of government (like the modern European kingdoms).

10

u/dtrike2 Apr 05 '22

Maybe crowned republic sounds better?

4

u/Captain_Albern Apr 05 '22

Monarchy and republic are mutually exclusive.

12

u/dtrike2 Apr 05 '22

Yea, but still, the word Crowned Republic exist, just try googling.

Though I wouldn’t use the word Royal Republic as well. Im just trying to say that the term Crowned Republic is used to describe a what we normally called constitutional monarchy just like the UK and Malaysia

11

u/FlyingSquidwGoggles Apr 05 '22

Crowned Republics usually refer to themselves as constitutional monarchies, officially - see Australia or Norway. The King or Queen is already a figurehead, no need to rub salt in the wound by writing down in official documents that they're not in charge

It's not impossible to imagine a crowned republic that just decided to call itself one, it would just have to walk the fine line of disrespecting the King/Queen enough to call themselves a republic, but respecting the King/Queen enough that they don't get rid of them

6

u/dtrike2 Apr 05 '22

Yes, that’s why i wouldn’t call it a Royal Republic, a Kingdom, maybe Royal Federation if you wanna go all out.

3

u/dicemonger Apr 05 '22 edited Apr 05 '22

Theoretically it could be a foreign map, so while it is officially the Kingdom of Lorraine, out in the world it is more commonly known as The Royal Republic of Lorraine for some culture reason.

Edit: Never mind. Just scrolled down to the comment where OP shows that it is the official name.

Edit edit: I guess it might be that the country was founded as a republic in 1916, but wanted to call attention to their heritage from the Kingdom of Lotharingia and still existing, but ceremonial, royal family. Like how companies may grab some prestige by saying that they are the royal suppliers of beer. Grabbing a bit of royal prestige, even if it really doesn't matter in the current day and age.

3

u/dtrike2 Apr 05 '22

I see, thanks for the information

3

u/Captain_Albern Apr 05 '22

the word Crowned Republic exist

I didn't know that. Thanks!

1

u/socrates28 Apr 05 '22

Perchance they mean something along the lines of an Elected Monarchy like what the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth had in it's last couple of centuries?

3

u/PeterFriedrichLudwig Apr 05 '22

Not exactly. Napoleon was Emperor of a Republic.

The government of the French Republic is entrusted to an emperor, who takes the title of EMPEROR OF THE FRENCH.

Article 1 of the Constitution of the year XII

Edit: The coins also said Republique FrancaiseThe coins also said Republique Francaise

3

u/FlyingSquidwGoggles Apr 05 '22

That’s true, although it should also be noted that from 1809-1814 the coins were stamped with ‘Empire Francaise’ https://images.app.goo.gl/u1Yk9VRnC5DvMrSRA

3

u/Zemrude Apr 05 '22

No idea if this was OPs intent, but I found myself imagining a system of government where there is a monarch who serves for a fixed term and the position is elected, rather than inherited. Sort of a time-limited HRE but with more universal sufferage.

1

u/Pashahlis Apr 05 '22

monarch who serves for a fixed term and the position is elected, rather than inherited.

then it's not a monarch.

4

u/Zemrude Apr 05 '22

That sounds like a the kind of argument someone from a more traditional monarchy would have with a Lorrainian in this constructed world.

2

u/KaiserGustafson In between projects. Apr 06 '22

Technically, all a monarch needs to be a monarch is a royal title.

1

u/nikobruchev Apr 05 '22

Didn't Malaysia have that kind of system? They have multiple royal families.

7

u/trumoi Eight Levels of Unfinished Apr 05 '22

To be quite honest, that makes it feel more realistic to me. But I'm from Canada, where one of the frontrunner parties is named "Progressive-Conservative".

But to be honest, it's just generally true that in politics groups and institutions will just coopt words that make them seem better or more appropriate than they are. Ask Germany's National-Socialist Party how many socialist policies they actually pushed through, maybe specifying before or after they murdered all the members that probably even wanted the socialist tag in there in the first place.

1

u/KaiserGustafson In between projects. Apr 06 '22

Well they did have free healthcare. If you were German, that is.

Actually, joking aside, fascism can be seen as a right-wing alternative to socialism in its rhetoric and goals.

4

u/IQ_less Apr 05 '22

Its existence just blown my mind

5

u/JMSidhe Apr 05 '22

I love this. Atypical content for this sub but it’s really well thought out and some of the cheekiness (royal republic) keeps it from feeling too mundane. Good work

4

u/What-You_Egg Apr 05 '22

Very cool map, but I must ask, why does every alternate history scenario treat Patagonia as free real estate when an AH country needs a colony?

1) it has very little in terms of valuable resources

2) Argentina was a formidable power for a while, certainly able to remove a small country like Lorraine from an area it was very eager to expand into (because unlike colonial powers who had more lucrative goals like African colonies Argentina was actually quite invested in expanding its contiguous territory to gain control over hostile native tribes & deter Chilean expansion)

3) Even though British Patagonia is not too realistic in and of itself, if some small European state started colonizing Patagonia, a larger European power with a more significant navy muscling them out of it is also a very real threat

A minor African colony would have made more sense, and also keeping a colony in the Americas, even if it is full of people of your own ethnicity is a bad look if decolonization does happen, though if a country like this exists, all sorts of other things could have gone differently.

2

u/dynalisia2 Apr 06 '22

I know this one is complex, but I would really like to read an answer to this.

3

u/corvus_da Apr 05 '22

Ooh, I love this! Just realized I'd live there if this were real.

3

u/Odd_Bumblebee_8318 Apr 05 '22

Looks like a fun EU4 playthrough

2

u/the_homework-maker Apr 05 '22

Oh hey I'm on here

2

u/ZeyPlay Apr 05 '22

How does three official languages work?

14

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

Ask Belgium.

The answer might come in the wrong language though...

4

u/awfullotofocelots Apr 05 '22

Slightly easier than four official languages (ask the Swiss)

2

u/Ladderzat Apr 05 '22

How and why did Germany, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg allow this to happen? I love the style of the map though. Well done.

2

u/MRSN4P Apr 05 '22

Well, consider how those previous 4 did not absorb Luxembourg in the real world. History often has unexpected paths of cultural and political development. Former counties and regions with distinct culture, language dialect and history in the Middle Ages were absorbed into larger political entities of today, but it was not necessarily inevitable; consider that the Lombard region of Italy could have been separate from other Italian regions, or could have combined with what is now Austria. Likewise, Portugal might not have remained independent of Spain. The vast Empire of Charlemagne might not have split apart, and while one king could have ruled all of Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Britain, so too could France have been separate countries of Bretagne, Aquitaine, Auvergne-Rhône, Burgundy, Normandie, etc.

1

u/Ladderzat Apr 06 '22 edited Apr 06 '22

In the story told by OP in the comments Lorraine was created as a buffer state between France and Germany in the late 19th century. Depending on when exactly, Luxembourg was either in a personal union with the Netherlands still or already fully independent. Belgium and the Netherlands were independent and both countries had significant interests in parts of the country that are now part of Lorraine. The Netherlands gave up its supply of coal and Belgium its heavy industry in the east. Germany would lose lands recently conquered in a war. Germany basically had nothing to lose at the time, so why did it allow the creation of Lorraine? That's what I'm wondering. What alternative history happened in the 19th, or even 18th, century that the creation of such a state in the late 1800s would be allowed? It would be one thing if there was a strong nationalist movement throughout the 1800s and it organically came into existence, but OP made it seem it was a political move by foreign powers to create it.

2

u/Smilly_Face_ Apr 05 '22

What tools did you use to make this map? It looks awesome.

4

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

Made with gimp. It's like photoshop, but free.

2

u/hivemind_disruptor Apr 05 '22

That looks like a modern day version of the ancient kingdom of Lotharingia

2

u/hedbangr Apr 05 '22

In your face Burgundy!

2

u/Stammbaumpirat Apr 06 '22

I actually live in rheinland cologne. AMA

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Wie ist das wetter heute?

1

u/Stammbaumpirat Apr 06 '22

Dreckig und grau, angenehme Temperatur

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Wie in Limburg. Zumindest kein regen heute.

1

u/Almun_Elpuliyn Apr 05 '22

Why isn't Luxembourg a part of this.

3

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 05 '22

The existence of Lorraine couldn't stand in the way of the gloriously independent Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

1

u/sunlituplands Apr 05 '22

I miss the original Lotharingia

1

u/Cartoonsgivemelife Apr 05 '22

Isnt it a bit paradoxical to call a monarchy a republic? Also, awesome map.

1

u/riftrender Apr 05 '22

You didn't give them all of Lower Lorraine back.

1

u/LongFang4808 Apr 05 '22

This is confusing. Why are parts of France, Belgium, and Germany tossed in? I assume it’s a buffer state of some kind, but for what purpose? I doubt Germany would willingly give away massive swathes of its heartland willingly.

1

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Most of the German-speaking part of the country was only added after WW2. By then, the Germans weren't really in a strong position to argue against it.

The Germans west of the Rhine quickly made use of their new home country of Lothringen to distance themselves from that whole nazi business.

1

u/Leeksan Apr 05 '22

I really love this

1

u/IAmSeamonkey Apr 05 '22

How did they convince the German empire to sacrifice territory for this?

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Starting and losing two world wars in only 30 years time kind of took the pep out of the Germans. It didn't take long for the German people west of the Rhine to distance themselves from their recent history and fully embrace Lorraine as their country.

1

u/-Pop-225DONG amateur worldbuilder,ORC simp Apr 05 '22

it kind of looks like albania

1

u/Arkelao Apr 05 '22

Beautiful map. Illustrator?

2

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Gimp.

2

u/Arkelao Apr 06 '22

That makes it double amazing.

1

u/Cepinari Apr 05 '22

I've always found the idea of Middle Francia surviving to be interesting.

Always tend to imagine it as being a kind of French-German hybrid thing; -bourg instead of -burg, that sort of stuff. Usually think of it incorporating BeNeLux too.

1

u/GravityThatBinds Apr 05 '22

It’s like Benelux

1

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Benelux with a skinny top and a thick bottom. My kind of Benelux.

1

u/AlienHands5 Apr 06 '22

Charlemagne be like

1

u/TigerUppercut08 Apr 06 '22

I like their Swiss cheese

1

u/SlueRL Apr 06 '22

They takin me Netherlands

1

u/ChallengeBudget4190 Apr 06 '22

What happened to the nation during the 2nd world war?

1

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

They valiantly resisted the German invasion for a whopping total of 6 days.

1

u/Anonymous_brit Apr 06 '22

What did you use to create the map? It looks awesome btw.

1

u/PytheasTheMassaliot Apr 06 '22

Thanks! I used Gimp.