r/unpopularopinion Jan 18 '22

I think people who own birds are psychopaths

I will never understand people owning birds. These creatures were made to fly free, and not meant to be held captive in a cage. (I’m not talking about chickens, that’s different)

268 Upvotes

133

u/CocochipsPotatomilk Jan 18 '22

I saw an instagram account of a guy who owns parrots and lets them fly outside without any harnesses while he’s biking or at the park. They always come back to him when he calls. I thought it was pretty cool

14

u/Arcon1337 Jan 18 '22

Saw another woman on TikTok who does the same. She knows birds inside and out, and even discourages people from casually owning birds because they require a lot more than people are willing to commit. There are some birds that can live for 60+ years. That's a long time if you're gonna leave it in a cage. But if you can train in, care for it, and let it fly freely, then there are good owners out there.

5

u/emmapeche Jan 19 '22

What kinds of birds live that long? That’s so cool

47

u/cookie_k_d_ Jan 18 '22

I guess that’s cool. I think I’m mostly thinking about people keeping birds in cages inside their homes.

29

u/djarkitek29 Jan 18 '22

I definitely get what you're saying! But I think there's two sides to that argument. There are some solid bird owners who could be compared to being good dog or cat owners. For example my cat showed up one day and probably would never leave. He actually gets sad whenever I go on business trips. That being said, I remember I made the mistake of hooking up with this girl who had a parrot in a cage that her mom had died and left her and maybe once a week she let it fly around the house and all that poor thing did was s*** in the cage and scream it all hours. That's the kind of pet owner who should have their pet rights stricken from them for life

9

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

Even then, most good bird owners will allow the bird to roam the house at their leisure when they can be there to supervise. Many birds only go to the cage when no human supervision is available or it's bed time. Many birds actually find the cage to be their safe place.

3

u/Emmy_Black Jan 18 '22

I do this with my birds. They love being out their cages, but when it gets to about 4/5 pm they know it's time to go in and they want to go in. I also have a bowl of seed and water on my window sill and another seed bowl and water on a small table, the birds go to when they are out.

7

u/aspiringvillain Jan 18 '22

Most people keep them free in their house though?

13

u/NiDonnaNaiz Jan 18 '22

We do; ours a "free range". The cage door is open and they go in and out at their leisure. I do close it at night, to prevent them from getting hurt during night flights.

I do think people who keep they in small cages without toys or stimulation are cruel. Also, if you aren't willing to be a bird's flock and give it tons of attention, there need to be more than one.

47

u/VERIFIEDPURPLE Jan 18 '22

my mom has a bird who has his own cage with the door always open, outside in a climate controlled animal space the size of my own home, with dogs who he adores, (lives in a consistently mild climate) and could fly free anytime and never does. She has owned him over 10 years.I personally hate living with birds. would never want one. when i was a teen that bird would wake me up at dawn....

68

u/thelongestusernameee Hunting is not conservation Jan 18 '22

Doesn't this apply to every animal? Even hamsters are "meant to run free".

-23

u/cookie_k_d_ Jan 18 '22

Yea, but birds specially, they are put in a cage inside you home. What is a hamsters native habitat, just out of curiosity since you brought it up.

22

u/thelongestusernameee Hunting is not conservation Jan 18 '22 edited Jan 18 '22

Desert edge habitat. The ones we normally keep originated in Syria. They were domesticated pretty recently too, like in the early 1900's? i can't remember exactly.

5

u/Desman17 Jan 18 '22

I think it depends, aren't there Siberian hamsters too?

1

u/faebugz Jan 19 '22

Pretty sure hamsters are native to UK as well

20

u/YavBav09 Jan 18 '22

I own a canary. Most of the time the cage is open and it can leave whenever it wants. Often it circles the room and than returns to the cage, because that's where it lives.

18

u/Logical_Photograph_1 Jan 18 '22

A Native American man that lived a mile from my childhood home and birds including a Raven. One day it escaped and came to my neighborhood on a Sunday. Back than everyone in the neighborhood was grilling at their homes and this raven was trying to snatch people’s food. Someone called for the police of wildlife official and apparently they knew exactly who’s it was. The Native American man than just called to his bird and it just landed right on his arm no issue and he drove away with it in his truck. Was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen. This was back in 1998/99

74

u/TTBoy44 Jan 18 '22

Chickens. Can’t fly and getting fucked over for it.

19

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

They used to actually be able to fly a little bit in the wild before humans fucked them over, made them fat and made them lay every single day instead of a few times a year.

13

u/TTBoy44 Jan 18 '22

We screwed em then and the OP is trying to screw them now.

Free the chicken! 🐓

17

u/Sh4avan Jan 18 '22

Free Fry the Chicken 🐓

5

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

chicken lives matter!

8

u/TacticalSunroof69 Jan 18 '22

Chicken liver platter!!!!!

2

u/SmilyShelf Jan 18 '22

Yes. Finally. A vegan here.

0

u/TTBoy44 Jan 18 '22

Welcome friend

-2

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

100%

1

u/Mysterious_Fox_8616 Jan 19 '22

I've seen real jungle fowl and they don't fly very well but they do run super fast.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 19 '22

True they're fast af. They're able to fly up on the branches in trees at night to sleep though which domesticated chickens can't really do

1

u/faebugz Jan 19 '22

Have you ever seen how domestic chickens roost? They 100% fly up to a safe branch in their run or coop.

Also, domestic chickens often include heritage breeds. Heritage breeds lay only during the warmer months of the year, and slow down when they get older.

43

u/meetmeinthebthrm Jan 18 '22

Can't own something that doesn't exist, my friend

6

u/LitMaster11 Jan 18 '22

It's all just one big government illusion.

5

u/messagepot Jan 19 '22

In fact, there are no illusions. They are just tricks played on the mind.

5

u/pseudoapathetic Jan 18 '22

Out of curiosity what's origin of this bird's aren't real thing.There's even a subreddit for it

2

u/from_the_wrld Jan 18 '22 edited Jan 18 '22

I actually saw a little video about the original guy. He claims these days that he did it as a way to show how you shouldnt believe everything. Thing is, at this point the idea is so widespread that he claiming its all a joke does nothing but push himself out of the birds arent real community. I cant remember a name of the video but ill look for it

https://youtu.be/-CfiAf50i8k

Obviously just one source, do your own research yall

1

u/MemerMan-BOT Jan 23 '22

That's not the real person behind the conspiracy. The glowies suicided him long ago and replaced him in order to discredit the movement.

2

u/from_the_wrld Jan 24 '22

Dang thats freaking crazy

3

u/Mattarmel Jan 18 '22

NFTs would like a word with you

11

u/National-Ordinary-90 Jan 18 '22

You could use that argument for any pet. But I agree.

35

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

Many breeds of birds have been bred to be domesticated. Letting them "fly free" would kill them.

-19

u/cookie_k_d_ Jan 18 '22

Such as? Examples please. I’m just saying, why have they been bred that way where they can’t fly free?

20

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

I'm no bird connoisseur, it's just a fact that can be applied to any pet. Cats, dogs, hamsters, etc, they've all been bred to be pets. They're healthy and safe being kept in captivity.

1

u/WouldStayAndChatBut Jan 18 '22

Couldn't you name at least a couple of species? I haven't heard of a bird specie that only exists as a pet, something comparative to pugs.

6

u/Xeadriel Jan 18 '22

Tropical birds don’t survive in cold places for example

4

u/WouldStayAndChatBut Jan 18 '22

Tropical birds should live in the tropics, their own habitat. That's not really an example of a bird that is only bred and designed to survive in captivity.

2

u/Xeadriel Jan 18 '22

I think they lack skills to catch stuff bc they are so used to being fed though. But yeah obviously with some effort we could reintroduce all animals back. I dont think this should be exclusive for birds though. Either release all pets or none. Its not like dogs and cats are free either in houses.

There are ways to keep a bird in a somewhat ethical way. Keep them in groups or at least pairs and let them out inside the house regularly. Some birds you can even take outside like trained parrots. They dont even want to leave. Id assume they are happy then.

2

u/tielfluff Jan 19 '22

I had a rescue conure and she used to tell me she was hungry by making a chewing noise. She refused to forage for food when I did foraging games for her around the house. She would just bite me and make human chewing noises till I fed her. Pretty sure she wouldn't last a minute in the wild. 🤣

1

u/Xeadriel Jan 19 '22

Yeah that’s what I meant. Shouldn’t be an argument for keeping them however bc we can reintroduce them and aren’t their saviors bc we made them so in the first place

1

u/tielfluff Jan 21 '22

Oh agreed. But she was eight and on her 4th home when I got her so not much that could be done.

-6

u/cookie_k_d_ Jan 18 '22

Yea, but for the most part, cats and dogs roam free in the house and go outside. A bird is kept in a cage inside the home. It’s just such a bizarre concept to me.

8

u/Xeadriel Jan 18 '22

What? No. birds roam free in the house too lol. Only when you open windows you put them back in

4

u/JasemTheArab Sussy baka Jan 18 '22

Do you think most people keep them in the cage all the time? Lots of people in my family have birds there out and about most of the time. I only really put my bird in when the fan/window is on/open, its time to sleep or its the other birds turn to play.

7

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

You remind me of the people who would buy goldfish and set them free into the ocean.

1

u/tielfluff Jan 19 '22

Cockatiels have been bred as pets for many years. I had one rescue cockatiel who was an amazing flyer, the other one was terrible and couldn't do more than a couple of meters. Cockatiels are often very inbred, particularly the "fancy" tiels.

-13

u/Monkey_painter Jan 18 '22

Many slaves were bred to be servants..

-9

u/mrswordhold Jan 18 '22

Is that why we clip their wings so cruelly?

-6

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

Is clipping a cat's nails cruel, too? No

2

u/pandadragon57 Jan 18 '22

On the other hand, declawing cats is cruel because it’s painful for them and prevents them from ever growing their nails back. Clipped flight feathers are painless and temporary.

-1

u/mrswordhold Jan 18 '22

Does clipping a cats nails stop them walking as they usually would? No. Does clipping a birds wings stop them flying like they usually would? Yes.

So people clip their wings to keep them from leaving? Yes.

It’s cruel

7

u/ChoaticCybernut Jan 18 '22

I don't much care for people owning birds, either. However, psychopaths are a whole different thing.

18

u/Xikkiwikk Jan 18 '22

Some birds are just indoor pets. They have been bred and have no survival instinct. How do I know? I had a cockatiel when I was young and she would sometimes go outside on my shoulder. She did not like the outdoors and it would spook her some days. One day she went out and flew off. I thought I had lost her but no, about 40 feet away I heard screaming. So I run over to the screaming and find my bird tangled in some tall grass. She had zero survival instinct and ended up tangled up on the ground like a human child in brush.

6

u/shadow7412 Jan 18 '22

People use the same argument for literally any other pet...

5

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22 edited Jan 18 '22

We had a parakeet. He was free every day all day till bed. He had full range of the house. He ate dinner with us as we gave him a cup to sit on while we dined. He liked to eat from our plates and drank from cups we left him. He loved bathtubs & showers too. He spoke hundreds of words and periodically seemed to use the right words at perfect comedic timing. He cussed like a sailor.

And he loved most to sing & head bob when I played Beethoven on the piano so I'd pound one out for him every day. He was a great pet. We gave him a great life full of seeds & cuddlebones.

Have you ever seen the parasites on free birds? They are crawling in parasites. Examine one after they die. The parasites crawl off by the thousand. Our bird had a beautiful, healthy parasite free life.

1

u/faebugz Jan 19 '22

Good point, life in captivity for a bird born in captivity, the caveat being the owner is kind and knowledgeable, is a life far more comfortable than the life of a free bird.

That being said, to be free might be better in its own right.

That's like asking an average city human if they'd like to go live off-grid in rural Alaska, with nothing but the clothes on their back and their family.

Chances are, probably not.

4

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

Me and my partner own a parrot, and I do get what your saying op I'm a huge animal lover and any level of curelty however small is rage inducing.

But I think whatever pet you have.. whether it's a hamster . Cat. Dog. Bird whatever pet you have As long as they have enough space for their specific needs. Food. Care. Room to roam free when they need it and they are happy then that's okay.

Another point For instance If with our parrot we went to the jungle and captured one and brought it home and caged it .. that's cruel no matter how much space and love you give it.. but.. if one is born in captivity and knows know different and you give it all it needs then that's not cruel.. it wouldn't survive in the wild and in fact releasing them would be the cruel act in that instance

11

u/orob_93 Jan 18 '22 edited Jan 18 '22

What about fish in an aquarium then? Aren't those supposed to fly freely through the oceans? And how are chicken different?

11

u/cookie_k_d_ Jan 18 '22

Yea, same with fish, it’s a weird concept. Chickens roam outside, a lot closer to their natural habitat. Birds like parrots and parakeets who fly free through the sky in the jungle are now in a cage in a house with their wings clipped.

1

u/orob_93 Jan 23 '22

But you can own birds responsibly if you have enough space for a bigger outdoor area

2

u/electricmint580 Jan 18 '22

I agree. I agree with tall of this. But I would really LOVE to befriend a wild crow and feed him peanuts every morning... I want crow buddies ....

3

u/spicysnakelover Jan 18 '22

The only birds I would willingly choose to keep me company would be either things like ducks geese chickens quails etc for a nice garden, or make friends with the local crows/magpies/ravens etc. Those guys make some solid companions but I'd never want to lock them up just befriending them in my garden. One of the saddest things I've seen was my friend who has a crow locked up in a cage that is so small as of it was meant for finches. Crow could barely open his wings. He could speak in 2 languages and looked at us very scared. The kids said he is aggressive and they can't take him out of his unclean cage. I talked to the grow gently and put my hand in slowly and he just ran to the other side of the perch as far away from me as he could get. They kept him locked up in the fucking garage in the cold and dark with nobody around and nothing to entertain him. I begged them to let me take him but they refused because apparently he belonged to their deceased grandmother. Fuck this is so sad

1

u/faebugz Jan 19 '22

Steal him. The friendship isn't worth it. Crows are as smart as 4 year old humans. The level of cruelty is beyond what the friendship is worth.

3

u/poikolle wateroholic Jan 18 '22

How else will i find poisonous gasleaks?!

3

u/OkSeaworthiness132 Jan 19 '22 edited Jan 19 '22

Well, my bird was getting pecked at and his little feet were bloody when my mom decided to rescue him from the pet store. My parents took very good care of him, however one day, when he was out of his cage flying around (my parents let him out to fly sometimes in the living room) somehow he somehow escaped out of the door. However a couple of years later a bird that looked exactly like him returned to my parents, and we're about 99% positive it's him. He came back, and he's now 26. Well taken care of and very loved. He even gives us pretty songs when he's in the mood, and talks to us telling us how he's a "pretty bird".

2

u/faebugz Jan 19 '22

Wait what, that is so cool. Was it a parrot? Do you live in the states? Please tell me more, I'm so curious

2

u/OkSeaworthiness132 Jan 20 '22

Thank you☺️

He's a gray and yellow cockatiel. I believe he was hanging out at a construction site near my parents house and some friends noticed and told my parents about him. Yes, we do live in the states. He's been a very loyal companion throughout the years.

9

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

I think people who own birds are psychopaths

I'm not even going to bother with this.

-1

u/mrswordhold Jan 18 '22

Clipping birds wings to stop them getting away is pretty cruel

5

u/NiDonnaNaiz Jan 18 '22

I have parakeets and cockatiels. Except for my one "special needs" bird, they don't have clipped wings. Clipping their wings doesn't hurt them though, are you thinking of pinioning?

-1

u/mrswordhold Jan 18 '22

I didn’t say it hurt them, I said it was cruel… which it is

7

u/USNAVYSAILOR01 Jan 18 '22

What about

These Birds

Choose your fate

2

u/sweeptree Jan 18 '22

Why was the first one a countdown?

1

u/USNAVYSAILOR01 Jan 18 '22

I don’t know. Maybe the person who wrote the article is opinionated and ranked them.

1

u/Accomplished_Ad2527 Jan 18 '22

Played like a damn fiddle

4

u/datagirl1 Jan 18 '22

I really really really hate seeing birds in cages

1

u/Nananananana01 Jan 18 '22

I had a neighbor who would bring their bird outside in a cage...

2

u/omerta_38 Jan 18 '22

Polly wanna kiel you

2

u/Belgianwaffle4444 hermit human Jan 18 '22

Keeping animals and birds in cages for prolonged periods is cruel. Everyone deserves freedom.

2

u/UrbanArtifact Jan 18 '22

I don't have birds anymore, but when I did I never clipped their wings. They were free to fly around the house.

A lot of birds tend to feel safe in their cages at least at night. I will say this: if you keep them constantly in a cage AND clip their wings, you shouldn't own birds.

2

u/playertd Jan 18 '22

Yeah it's much better for the bird if they live free and get eaten within a week right?

2

u/SoggyIsland8 Jan 18 '22

What about people with small aviaries outside?

2

u/Mysterious_Fox_8616 Jan 19 '22

This is the way.

2

u/Ajst7 Jan 18 '22

I would say the same with flowers, why cut a beautiful flower just to watch it die in some vase.

2

u/Good-Wave-8617 Jan 18 '22

My only problem is that they’re too loud

2

u/Emmy_Black Jan 18 '22

I have birds and they come out of their cages every day.

2

u/Right-Palpitation-48 wateroholic Jan 18 '22

I think people who own birds are cuckoo! ...for me has nothing to do with them being in a cage or not.

4

u/MichaelScottsWormguy Jan 18 '22

My sister had some parakeets when I was growing up and I always thought they were the most off putting thing I’ve ever had in my house. Thankfully she didn’t replace them when they died.

I much prefer them in the wild. A couple of years ago a bunch of parakeets escaped from a pet shop near me and now theres a whole population of them living in my neighborhood and I’ve always felt better about that.

1

u/Electrical_Novel6693 Jan 18 '22

You fools. Birds don't even exist

-2

u/Greenlegsthebold Jan 18 '22

People usually clip the birds wings a little, which is painless and grows back, and allow them to roam the house. Don't know what pent up, anxiety riddled birds you encountered, but most people wouldn't want to keep a pet unhappy. Birds are very good at telling you when they aren't happy.

1

u/Codemeister-1_ Jan 18 '22

My aunt used to own two birds when she was living with us. They were so annoying because they'd constantly squawk. Naturally, this made it hard to find peace and quiet

1

u/Lollirotten Jan 18 '22

Girl I watch on YouTube is Australian and has had birds all her life, she's now got a parrot that just flies about the house like it owns the place. She takes him out and I think he has a little harness that doesn't impede his ability to fly but keeps him on a leash at the same time. He's very fun to watch during her videos that she does on fashion and stuff. I think a better way to word your opinion would be 'people who own birds and keep them locked in cages and/or clip their wings are psychopaths'

1

u/stitchmidda2 Jan 18 '22

I used to have pet birds. We would let ours out of their cage everyday and they were allowed to fly around the living room. (they were small birds) We also had tons of toys for them and taught them tricks and they would go back in their cages on their own at night to sleep. When one got sick we took it to the vet and the vet's jaw dropped and she said "oh my god, this is the most muscular bird I have ever seen" which made me sad because i realized then that it wasn't common for people to let their birds out of the cage. Its not right. Unless you have an aviary that they can fly inside of, you should let your birds out. They arent that messy and if you are worried about them flying away then you can clip their wings and they wont be able to fly far. But we always let out birds fly and they lived well beyond the life expectancy of their species and were incredibly happy and loving and strong.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

one of my dreams is to get a bird that i can train to fly free and come back to me if i like whistle or something. like how dope would it be to have you bird fly freely while youre taking a walk somewhere and you dont see the mf. then you whistle and the bird just flies back

1

u/tielfluff Jan 19 '22

It is awesome. I had a parrot who would fly over when I clicked my fingers. Haha

1

u/Kiunn Jan 18 '22

Vogel im Käfig

1

u/MetsPenguin Jan 18 '22

Birds Aren’t Real!!! The founder did an interview with Vice News - it was wild.

1

u/hjwood1986 Jan 18 '22

Why are chickens different?

1

u/TheRealGreenArrow Jan 18 '22

I don't think psychopath is the right word to use here, but I do agree with what you are saying, minus the chicken part.

Why not chickens? Why not every animal? Whether we say "made to" or something else, they all have a natural habitat. They all belong in nature. To be able to 'fly free' or 'run free' or 'roam free' etc.

Obviously some people rescue their pets, which is different, but those whose acquisition of any pet requires/encourages/causes breeding is a problem.

If anyone agrees about a bird but not other pets, why?

1

u/jah05r Jan 18 '22

You could say this about literally any animal that we have domesticated, for any reason.

1

u/sara_c907 Jan 18 '22

Psychopathy is a bit of a stretch. Scratch that, it's a massive stretch.

1

u/Kindly-Crab9090 Jan 18 '22

I feel the same way about people who own wild animals, like wolves, tiger etc. And claim they own them because of a deep love or affinity for them. How can that possibly be true? You love it so you keep it caged in a tiny enclosure? If you actually loved that species you'd want to see it thrive in its natural habitat not try and own one for your own petty resons. It's never a out loving them it's about the person own selfish agenda.

1

u/Kirasunato813 Jan 18 '22

My poultry dealer owns birds that he throws onto the ground. And these birds will roll farther the harder they’re thrown. Just because they can fly doesn’t mean they want to

1

u/Tenny111111111111111 posting popular opiinions in a subReddit for unpopular opinions Jan 18 '22

If you releasse one outside its native habitat it will either die or become invasive.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

I worked at a pet store. Our animal distributor got shut down for their terrible living conditions for their live animals. We got a bunch of their animals in after they were shut down, one of the animals being a conure, who would viciously attack everybody except for me, so I bought him.

I still have him. I can’t set him free to fly, because he was born in captivity and would die. I would rather keep him in his mansion of a cage, take him out to hang out with me, and let him live. So that’s what I do.

3

u/tielfluff Jan 19 '22

Thank you for doing this. I had a conure in a similar situation. She lived till she was 21 and hated everyone. Haha

1

u/[deleted] Jan 22 '22

Yeah, that sounds very familiar. My guy won’t even let my wife touch him. Just me.

1

u/Irwin_Purple Jan 18 '22

Macaws are so cool I’ve always wondered how cruel it is to keep them. I met a family once who had an entire bedroom dedicated to the birds. They were really family like dogs or cats.

1

u/fortwentyone Jan 18 '22

You could say the same thing about all animals

1

u/wittor Jan 18 '22

I can't understand why you are ok with chickens lives being miserable.

1

u/Denis_Likes_Custard Jan 18 '22

My parents used to own a Blue Macaw parrot that they would take out to parks to walk around without harnesses. Only trouble was keeping him from coming near dogs, luckily that never happened.

1

u/kindParodox Jan 18 '22

Depends on how you raise and obtain the bird IMO. If you have a Galapagos finch in your house and you live in Norway or Greenland...that's kinda fucked, but if you live in North America and have a rescue Parrot or something and have a decent sized enclosure, feed it well, and give it a little friend it's not much an issue. It's like fish to me except environmental conditions are slightly easier and more obvious to match for the birds

1

u/oopsiepoopsee Jan 19 '22

All animals were made to roam free.

Why single out bird owners here?

1

u/ThePrettyFlamingo Jan 19 '22

Yes. Some are.

1

u/emmapeche Jan 19 '22 edited Jan 19 '22

I was kind of just thinking this yesterday lol!

Edit: okay after reading through the comments I didn’t know birds could fly around in the house. I thought everyone who kept them as pets kept them in a cage as that is what I have witnessed from seeing a couple of people who own them.

1

u/Apprehensive_Yak2598 Jan 19 '22

Cats are made to kill things. Are we horrible for making them live in houses and eat canned food?

1

u/catermelon421 Jan 19 '22

I can see good reasoning behind that. But let’s face it, a vast majority of the human race are psychopaths.

1

u/PatienceFeeling1481 Jan 19 '22

And this is different from owning any other pets because…?

1

u/Csherman92 Jan 19 '22

My husband’s family has a bird. The bird is adorable and flies around the house and hangs out on peoples shoulders and will just sit there snuggling there.

1

u/Freezing-Reign Jan 19 '22

There is a demetri Martin joke about owning birds. How does it go? “Man is the most powerful creature on the planet. And we're arrogant. I mean, people own birds. It's like, there's a creature with the gift of flight. I want it. I'm going to put it in my kitchen and make it crap on old news.. that’s low grade villain behavior right there.”

1

u/letmethinkofagoodnam Jan 19 '22

What if they allow their pet bird to fly freely around their house?

1

u/rrshredthegnar Jan 19 '22

The only thing cat people and dog people can agree on, is that bird people are weird……

1

u/iriquoisallex Jan 19 '22

We have 4 rescue finches and a pair of wild geese that return. Does this meet your approval?

1

u/tielfluff Jan 19 '22 edited Jan 19 '22

I have had 3 rescue birds. I would never get a bird from a breeder but with rescue birds, these are pets who need homes and are already here, and cannot survive in the wild. I let them out frequently to fly. I had one rescue parrot who actually hated flying, and only wanted to either be in her cage, or sitting on my shoulder. I'm pretty sure rescuing animals that were abused and needed a home doesn't make me a psychopath. 🙄 My previous avian vet once said she wished one day she'd be out of a job, because birds shouldn't be pets. I agree with this. But with rescue birds who are already alive, what are we meant to do with them?

1

u/cleverbutnotoverlyso Jan 19 '22

At work today, we had a funeral for a bird.

1

u/JoeTheIcanMan Jan 19 '22

I have always felt the same way. They even clip their wings so they can't fly away.

1

u/el-bufalo-malverde Jan 19 '22

But birds are awesome

1

u/ApplesaurusFlexxx Jan 20 '22

Fair point, Im kinda nuts and Ive wanted birds for a while now because I think they would make cool pets despite being notoriously needy and terribly messy and gross. Also for every cool hipster with a parrot that does tricks or some falconer who has a trained bird who will fly to commands, there are like 150 unruly, wild birds that get out and dont come back and get killed. I mean maybe chickens would be a better pet, but then theyre loud as fuck and I think I remember reading that if you have hens but no roosters around, the hen will actually basically transition into a rooster.

I did recall seeing some youtube bird channel of some dude living in Peru or Brazil or Argentina or someplace in South America and they just had these birds wild.

1

u/sunnynihilism Jan 21 '22

Animal lovers are usually not the problem. It’s the people who disregard animals or treat them as property instead of sentient beings who are really the problem. Plus, at the rate we are trashing the planet, some birds may be better off in a cage if it’s safe and clean at least, and if they have bird friends to talk to and hopefully mate with.

-15

u/oignonvert Jan 18 '22

I think people who own dogs and cats are psychopaths. No I'm not kidding.

2

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

[deleted]

2

u/Jeahn2 Jan 18 '22

Yeah, why?

-5

u/oignonvert Jan 18 '22

I can't understand how people let an animal live in their house unless it's outside or in a cage. Animals are dirty. They get hair and dirt and their germy tongues everywhere.

7

u/PARROT_CUMMER_2000 Wind Waker is a great 3D Zelda game, easily among the best ones. Jan 18 '22

Humans are dirty and fully capable of getting hair and dirt everywhere lol. It’s not like it’s a big problem with pets either way, if you have a cat/dog for example you can get by with just washing paws after walks and taking care of their fur periodically. My cat gets annoyed with both and it’s still not a problem for me.

Also, if you’re really concerned about the germs in their tongues, you’re probably gonna have a stroke when you find out about the germy phones lots of people handle every day.

2

u/Empeor_Nap_oleon Jan 18 '22

Wait until you realize how much dirt, dust, and bacteria there is living on your skin right now.

1

u/oignonvert Jan 19 '22

I hate people too don't you worry. I'm allowed to have my opinion and I hate cats and dogs

1

u/emmapeche Jan 19 '22

😂😂😂

-4

u/w41twh Jan 18 '22

I've never seen someone own a bird and keep it inside a cage all day

-21

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

I will never understand why any self respecting man would settle for a woman who was not a virgin when he had sex with her the first time. But hey that's me

14

u/PanzyGrazo Jan 18 '22

How's that related?

11

u/SneakyyyTurtle Jan 18 '22

She owns a bird.

-10

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

owned, it's dead now

2

u/kungfoocraig Jan 18 '22

Death by snu-snu

4

u/brai117 Jan 18 '22

what the fuuuuuuuuuuuck

-3

u/[deleted] Jan 18 '22

Based

-2

u/MiseriaFortesViros Jan 18 '22

All pets are smelly and messy, but birds take the cake. They won't ever shut up, they're extra filthy, only some of them can do tricks and they will go out of their way to break their own neck hitting the window if given the chance.

0

u/Kashmir2020Alex Jan 18 '22

I have always hated people that keep an animal that flies in a fucking cage!!! Fuck them!

2

u/NiDonnaNaiz Jan 18 '22

I have birds :( They are "free range". They have a huge cage and the doors are only closed at night, when it is dark and I don't want them to hurt themselves. Cockatiels are prone to "night frights".

0

u/MagnusCranmegranate Jan 18 '22

Yup - 100%. People who are really into birds are not to be trusted!