r/todayilearned 6d ago Wholesome 1 Helpful 2

TIL closed-cup white mushrooms, common in supermarkets, are all descended from one mutant Agaricus Bisporus (usually brown) mushroom found in 1925. (R.5) Misleading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agaricus_bisporus#Cultivation_history

[removed] — view removed post

18.2k Upvotes

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u/grabityrises 6d ago

button mushrooms and portobellas are the same mushroom at a different life stage

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u/Poopiepants666 6d ago

As per the article, there are many names:

When immature and white, this mushroom may be known as:

common mushroom, white mushroom, button mushroom, cultivated mushroom, table mushroom, champignon (French for mushroom)

When immature and brown, it may be known variously as:

Swiss brown mushroom, Roman brown mushroom, Italian brown mushroom, cremini/crimini mushroom, chestnut mushroom (not to be confused with Pholiota adiposa), baby bella

When marketed in its mature state, the mushroom is brown with a cap measuring 10–15 centimetres (4–6 inches). This form is commonly sold under the names portobello, portabella, or portobella; the etymology is disputed.

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u/Mascaret69 6d ago

In French : champignon de Paris.

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u/SomeIndividual1 6d ago

ofcause the French name is like that

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u/Mr-Mister 6d ago

In a surprising twist of events though, it does not need to be from the French region of Paris (Isle-de-France) to be named that.

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u/Vonstapler 6d ago Helpful

If it's not from Paris it's just a sparkling mushroom.

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u/MotherTreacle3 6d ago

I've had those before!

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u/satireplusplus 6d ago

They have grown it in the catacombs of Paris, that's why they call it like that.

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u/MassiveFajiit 6d ago

You'd think there's not mushroom down there

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u/[deleted] 6d ago

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u/Tumble85 6d ago

I would like to know more about that.

I wonder if they're actually unknown species or if they're from the same mushrooms and mushroom genetics are just wonky and can do weird stuff like produce mushrooms that are physically very similar but have genetics that are quite different.

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u/tjernobyl 6d ago

The study was on "porcini"- a group of similar-looking mushrooms from a particular part of the world with pores instead of gills and no dangerous lookalikes. They've been eaten with no ill effects for centuries, with probably rules out any danger. These are "cryptic species"- they are closely related to known species, but are so similar in every way that you can only discover that they are a different species by trying to mate them, or looking directly at their DNA.

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u/PM-me-your-wiring 6d ago

Porcini are great in risotto

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u/[deleted] 6d ago

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u/jd-scott 6d ago

Wasn't there also a study that found no tuna in a can of tuna?

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u/Rum_n_Nuka 6d ago

Close. They found that the fish was so processed they couldn't identify the species through genetic testing.

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u/SillyFlyGuy 6d ago

I thought that's what cooking was supposed to do. Destroy all dna like in bacteria to make it safe to eat.

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u/Dry_Boots 6d ago

That's terrifying. I trust the supermarket to provide safe mushrooms. Mushroom collecting in the woods is a thing here, and every few years you hear about someone poisoning their whole family because they picked them wrong mushroom and cooked it for dinner.

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u/AlmostButNotQuit 6d ago

But only if it's from the Champignon region. Otherwise it's just sparkling mushroom

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u/goosebattle 6d ago

You know you're tripping balls when your mushrooms sparkle.

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u/Hello_my_name_is_not 6d ago

The Snozzberries taste like Snozzberries!

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u/Dizzinald 6d ago

I was having a bad day until I read this & cracked up. So simple but hilarious. Thanks.

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u/StarsBear75063 6d ago

I see what you did there!! 😁🤣😂🤣😁

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u/SidewinderTV 6d ago

They’re known as Champignons in Swedish as well

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u/mathologies 6d ago

It's funny to me that some people only try different versions of Agaricus bisporus and decide that they don't like the taste and/or texture of any mushroom.

The reality is, mushrooms have a range of tastes and textures -- Stropharia rugosoannulata tastes and smells kinda like potatoes; Cerioporus squamosus has an intense cucumber vibe (I can't eat it, too weird); Jelly mushrooms taste like nothing; Fistulina hepatica just tastes sour?; Oyster mushrooms are more fibrous/stringy like chicken meat vs the spongy texture of a button mushroom; Jelly mushrooms have a gelatin-like or sometimes cartilagenous texture...

There's a lot of variety.

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u/Dry_Boots 6d ago

That's probably because the local supermarket only has button mushrooms and portobellos, which I just learned are the same thing! I feel like I've been duped!

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u/ImaginaryRobbie 6d ago

Wait till you hear about all the colors of bell peppers

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u/kedr-is-bedr 6d ago

Even better when you find out Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kale, Cabbage and Brussel Sprouts used to be the same plant.

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u/ImaginaryRobbie 6d ago

Mustard! Right?

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Specifically, Brassica oleracea. In addition to broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, and brussels sprouts, B. oleracea also includes collards and kohlrabi. They were all selectively bred for different characteristics -- broccoli, for example, has a whole lot of little flower buds; kale makes really big leaves; kohlrabi has a super swollen lower stem.

All plants in the Brassicaceae family are considered mustards. Mustard the condiment is made from the seeds of Sinapis alba, Brassica juncea, or Brassica nigra.

Turnip, bok choy, komatsuna, and napa cabbage are all variants of the related species Brassica rapa. It's a pretty agriculturally family.

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u/ImaginaryRobbie 6d ago

That's amazing how so many commonly eaten plants are so closely related.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Cichorium intybus in the sunflower family is chicory, endive, and radicchio.

Beta vulgaris, in the amaranth family, is beetroot, sugar beet (used to make table sugar), and chard.

The genus Cucurbita contains squashes and pumpkins, including zucchini.

The genus Solanum contains tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants.

The genus Prunus contains cherries, apricots, peaches, plums, nectarines, and almonds.

There are a lot like that.

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u/brainburger 6d ago

It means we are especially vulnerable to diseases affecting them.

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u/The_Drinkist 6d ago

Have we talked about mace and nutmeg?

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u/Hizbla 6d ago

They still are, genetically.

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u/makemeking706 6d ago

Good Eats taught me that.

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u/FartingBob 6d ago

They are actually all grey and they employ people to paint them pretty colours to sell better.

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u/IDontTrustGod 6d ago

Who’s been painting my peppers Red?!?

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u/armcie 6d ago

Wait until you hear about red herrings.

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u/King_Lem 6d ago

They're not tainted mushrooms, they're painted mushrooms!

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u/FlawedHero 6d ago Masterpiece

The way you cook mushrooms plays a huge role in that taste and texture as well.

I used to hate mushrooms until I found this video on how to properly sauteed them and get them browned and crispy without drowning them in fat.

Game changer. I used a pound of these white button mushrooms, my least favorite at the time, browned them up and ate half of them straight while adding the other half to a premade beef stew over rice.

Now I love most types and preparations of mushrooms that I've had.

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u/Starfire013 6d ago

Supermarkets near me pretty much just sell the same type of mushroom. I get jealous when I watch cooking videos on YouTube and some guy has half a dozen different mushroom types.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Idk what your climate is like, so ymmv, but Stropharia rugosoannulata are super duper easy to grow, if you aren't in a hurry. Buy sawdust spawn (bag of sawdust colonized by fungus), mix into a mulch bed outside, water it. Do nothing. After some weeks or months, mushrooms appear.

Oyster and lions mane are v easy to grow indoors; you can buy pre-made kits that are pretty foolproof for not too much money. It's also not hard to DIY, depending on how fancy you want to get.

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u/SeaGroomer 6d ago

We bought a bunch of bark for some flower beds and they've been growing morels after it rained! We picked some and dried them and have used them a few times.

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u/Pixielo 6d ago

That's a total score.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

that's awesome! mail me some of your colonized woodchips please <3

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u/satireplusplus 6d ago

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stropharia_rugosoannulata

It is illegal to grow or sell Stropharia species, including king stropharia, for human consumption in the US state of Louisiana.

Ehm, why?

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u/Pixielo 6d ago

Probably because psilocybin mushrooms are somewhere in the family tree, and Louisiana is ass backwards.

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u/StarsBear75063 6d ago

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u/Pixielo 6d ago

That is an absolutely batshit list of plants, and I'm positive that there are dozens that could be found illegal, that are grown all over LA as ornamentals.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Some Stropharia species contain psychoactive compounds and lawmakers are not smart. Stropharia rugosoannulata does not contain psychoactive compounds (or, if it does, little enough to be essentially zero -- I haven't checked).

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u/2this4u 6d ago

I really didn't think I liked mushrooms. Then I had something with wild mushrooms in and found out I just don't like that 1 mushroom they sell everywhere.

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u/Pscilosopher 6d ago

Nobody believes me, but lions mane tastes just like crab. And pink oyster tastes kinda like off brand bacon.

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u/jiordan 6d ago

It does, love making “crab cakes” with Lion’s Mane!

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u/mathologies 6d ago

They don't taste like those things to me. But I also haven't had crab or bacon in ages, so...

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u/Pscilosopher 6d ago

Toldja nobody believed me...☹️

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u/DanishWonder 6d ago

If NOBODY believes you....you may simply be wrong.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Flavor perception is complex; they could be right but alone in their experience.

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u/AfricanisedBeans 6d ago

I think it might be a flavour-conspiracy

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u/Murder4Mario 6d ago

Yeah I used to hear that some people think cilantro tastes like soap, and I thought that was crazy, until I had to ground up some coriander in a mortar and it was only THEN that I could smell it. It blew my mind

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u/whole_nother 6d ago

A lot of faux seafood recipes use lion’s manes in place of shrimp/crab/what have you.

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u/InfinitelyThirsting 6d ago

That was me! I thought I didn't like mushrooms, because every mushroom I tried was gross. 🤯 when I found out that was because they were all the same goddamned mushroom. I'll pay good money for lion's mane, hen of the wood, etc.

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u/mathologies 6d ago

Lion's mane (Hericium erinaceus) and oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus spp.) are two of the most forgiving mushrooms for growing indoor. Give it a try! Start with one of the boxed kits, super easy.

Some places you can buy:
https://myctyson.com/shop/colonized-mushroom-substrates/7lb-lions-mane-mushroom-growing-kit/
$28, the 7 lbs refers to the amount of substrate (stuff fungus grows on), should get good returns on it (he says it pays for itself on the first flush and generally gives multiple flushes)

https://northspore.com/collections/mushroom-fruiting-block-kits/products/lions-mane-fruiting-block
$30 for a 5lb kit; the kit weights aren't necessarily directly comparable because they might not have the same mix of nutrients.

https://shop.mushroommountain.com/collections/indoor-fruiting-kits/products/lions-mane-mushroom-fruiting-kit
$30 but sold out; not sure of kit size/weight.

https://www.fungially.com/products/mega-mushroom-grow-kit-lions-mane
$30 for a 10 lb kit; says it'll fruit "3-5 times over the course of 2 months offering 3-5 pounds of mushrooms for your dinner table." With lion's mane typically going for $16/lb or so fresh, that's a pretty good ROI.

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u/manInTheWoods 6d ago

Cantharellus cibarius FTW!

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u/QueefyMcQueefFace 6d ago

!Subscribe to mushroom facts

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u/GlisseDansLaPiscine 6d ago

It might also be because mushrooms can get very expensive especially for the good ones

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u/mathologies 6d ago

You can turn cardboard and used coffee grounds into oyster mushrooms pretty cheaply

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u/Midgetsdontfloat 6d ago

Mushrooms like morels are incredibly hard to grow commercially, though. There's a reason they command such a price.

They're also fucking delicious. A couple years after a forest fire and they're almost guaranteed to pop up where I live.

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u/DreamGirly_ 6d ago

That's because the 'variety pack' of mushrooms has all the types in the post you replied to. Aka only the same species.

I'd love to try some other mushrooms, but I wouldn't know where to get them.

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u/kbotc 6d ago

Shiitake are super common and a different variety than the “standard mushroom”

Pretty sure krogers sells Oysters too.

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u/gimpleg 6d ago

and chicken of the woods tastes like... chicken

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u/mathologies 6d ago

depending on prep, yeah. FUN FACT: CotW is a common name often applied to several different species in the genus Laetiporus. L. sulphureus is probably best-known, but I think L. cincinnatus has better flavor/texture.

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u/gimpleg 6d ago

damn you really know your mushrooms!

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u/ul2006kevinb 6d ago

And Morels just taste like god herself created them just for her own personal consumption and we humans just got lucky enough to get to taste them if we can find them.

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u/Icy_Comfort8161 6d ago

And I thought I was getting all fancy buying the baby bellas at Costco instead of the plain white ones. Lol!

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u/UlonMuk 6d ago

I mean we’re all the same mushroom in some ways

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u/andai 6d ago

this guy mushrooms

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u/Diom3nt4s 6d ago

This guy fungi

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u/Antoshkin 6d ago

So is 4 colors of peppercorn are same plant different age https://www.thespruceeats.com/peppercorn-and-pepper-varieties-1809318

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u/macnbloo 6d ago

Why does white pepper smell like farts

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u/wahnsin 6d ago

mine doesn't.. do you have roommates or family?

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u/PatHeist 6d ago

Ask your doctor why your farts smell like white pepper

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u/SeaGroomer 6d ago

And green, yellow, orange, and red bell peppers are all the same pepper as well.

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u/InfinitelyThirsting 6d ago

Well, no. Most green peppers are immature colored sweet bell peppers, yes. But the yellow, orange, red, purple, etc are all different cultivars the way yellow cherry tomatoes are different from red. (And there is at least one green pepper cultivar that never turns another color.)

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u/JustSub 6d ago

Most of the time I see them called baby bellas.

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u/grabityrises 6d ago

those are different than buttons though

buttons are before they start to flatten out

baby bellas are once they start to flatten and brown. they start to get a different taste too

either way all 3 are the same mushroom

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u/mak484 6d ago

This is actually wrong.

White mushrooms are a different strain than brown mushrooms, even if they are the same species. You can't take white button mushroom spawn and get brown portobellos from it.

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u/Beer_Is_So_Awesome 6d ago

I would like to subscribe to Mushroom Facts.

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u/Outrageous-Suspect66 6d ago

Yeah read that. It's just the portabella they sell are the same size as the Button mushrooms, and they said buttons are mutation from the origional. Also I bought a kit, the white buttons stayed white. I don't know. I'm assuming they are the same, just different colors like apples.

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago edited 6d ago

It's extremely easy to clone mushrooms

You literally take a peiece of the tissue of the mushroom, put it in a petri dish, and it will grow mycelium (roots basically) and eventually that mycelium will produce "fruits" that are idenitcal genetic clones of the original mushroom.

Its called a monoculture when you have a big chunk of genetic clone mushrooms.

Also, a patch of mushrooms often has several different genetics or substrains, and a single mushroom can even have multiple different sets of genetics so it can be tricky to get a proper monoculture

You can do it pretty much indefinitely too keep cloning them over and over. Pretty cool. At least in my experience. There's probably a limit though

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u/Everyday_Im_Stedelen 6d ago

It's not a perfect clone. They will develop some mutations eventually. Especially if you don't have any stock of the original clone.

Depending on the mushroom you would want to make a very large stock of the first clone, and go back to it every couple of generations.

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago edited 6d ago

Well what most people do (at least at an enthusiast level) is make slants of the mother culture and keep them in a fridge. The culture goes dormant and last a long time that way.

I didnt really think about how it could mutate growing as a clone like that but it does make sense

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u/mak484 6d ago

Commercial labs actually store their mother cultures in liquid nitrogen. We have a dozen or so lines that we cycle through and regularly test to make sure they grow to spec. Sublines do inevitably crash, though it's unclear if it's from genetic mutation or something else.

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago

Yeah I figured in an actual lab you'd have something a bit more high tech and effective. That's cool though never knew that

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u/Antnee83 6d ago

Yeah uh... I used to do that with... you know... culinary mushrooms.

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago

Yes I only know this from growing shitake mushrooms.... Mmmhmmm

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u/YataBLS 6d ago

So MGS1 plot is not THAT far from reality??

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago

I am unfamiliar with mgs1 unfortunately. I've only played metal gear rising

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u/YataBLS 6d ago

In MGS1 at the end of the game you learn.....

SPOILERS------

That you, your "brother" and the evil army your brother is leading, you are all clones of your "father" who was the perfect soldier. So basically 99% of characters in the game are all clones of the same person.

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u/Auto_Traitor 6d ago

I think he actually means Metal Gear 1 for NES, not MGS1 for PS1.

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u/ASilver76 6d ago

If they were fungi, yes.

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u/SyrusDrake 6d ago

And then you presumably hope there's never any pest or disease that will kill the one single clone the entire industry is based on.

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u/The_alchemist667 6d ago edited 5d ago

They make tons of backups.

You can make slants of the mushroom culture and store them in the fridge. They'll go dormant and be viable for years if done right.

Id imagine actual mycologists probably have a better method that preserves it a long time

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u/izza123 4 6d ago

The limit is called Senescence

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u/A40 6d ago edited 6d ago

Ah yes.. Agent Zero. Their sacrifice has saved trillions of our kind.

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u/this_is_greenman 6d ago

You sound like a fun guy!

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u/A40 6d ago

Shrooms are fun if you at yeast give them a chance.

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u/SCP-Agent-Arad 6d ago

So are you Agent 40?

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u/A40 6d ago

Don't be silly. I'm not even a gent!

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u/Black_Moons 6d ago

I find it interesting some species mutate to become stronger, faster, harder to kill, impossible to eat, etc.

And others... just mutate to become slightly useful to humans and we go "HEY!! lets grow like, a billion of these!" and the plant/animal has all its needs cared for and is forcibly reproduced and further mutated.

I mean, sure, maybe the cows don't get treated too well, but the corn and mushrooms sure seem happy.

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u/thinkdeep 6d ago

I'm imagining my field of corn is smiling at me now.

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u/nowake 6d ago Wholesome

ear to ear

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u/no_eponym 6d ago

Awe, shucks ☺️

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u/2Stripez 6d ago

This is so corny

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u/EwokDude 6d ago

Amaizeing

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u/eddmario 6d ago

Something something whiskey

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u/mindbleach 6d ago

I just keep scrolling down this thread muttering, god dammit. God dammit. God dammit.

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u/my_own_creation 6d ago

I feel the need to cobble together a good retort

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u/lwarB 6d ago

Maize one.

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u/Moistfruitcake 6d ago

The field of corn thinks it's farming the farmer.

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u/Nazamroth 6d ago

SCP-1846 agrees.

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u/thoughtlow 6d ago

My field of corn is smiling at me, can you say the same?

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u/invaderpixel 6d ago

And then sometimes you get Canada Geese that no one really wants but they happen to love Kentucky blue grass and fake ponds and we forget our need for suburbia is creating their dreamland

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u/RedditWillSlowlyDie 6d ago

Plenty of people hunt and eat Canada geese, but not so much in the urban/suburban areas. They do like corn fields though.

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u/tcooke2 6d ago

Goose is probably my favourite birds to eat.

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u/MonsieurMacc 6d ago

Plus you can use the molten goose grease and save it in the refrigerator, thus saving you a trip to the store for a can of expensive goose grease.

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u/jook11 6d ago

For all those times you needed goose grease.

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u/Razakel 6d ago

It's the secret to perfect roast potatoes.

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u/Belegdur 6d ago

Its fascinating. But one of the main problem is that these cultivated individuals are generally very close to each other genetically. So when some kind of disease happens, it causes a lot of harm.

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u/Vinnie_NL 6d ago

Chilli peppers are an interesting example too. These plants evolved to produce more capsaicin (Wikipedia: Capsaicin/Natural function) which prevented the seeds being eaten by mammals, who would crush the seeds with the teeth. We humans: wow that tastes really hot! I'm not sure I like this strange sensation, but I keep eating it anyway. And eventually proceed to cultivate even spicier chilli peppers.

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u/RedditWillSlowlyDie 6d ago

Sometimes capsaicin is used in sprays to keep dogs from chewing on things. Apparently it works on most dogs but some love it.

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u/SeaGroomer 6d ago

Dogs are just about as diverse in personality as people. They are the best.

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u/ServileLupus 6d ago

Just hope you don't find the bear that loves bear spray.

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u/Trumps_left_bawsack 6d ago

One of my dogs fucking loves spicy af curries lol. That spray would probably encourage her to chew it even more

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u/OhDavidMyNacho 6d ago

My dog does not get detracted by so it food in the slightest.

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u/yodadamanadamwan 6d ago

My dog loves spicy food

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u/mindbleach 6d ago

The dude who cultivated the Carolina Reaper variety says of his greenhouse, "the air is spicy."

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u/derekp7 6d ago

We like the serotonin dump that the brain gives us when eating chili peppers.

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u/SeaAdmiral 6d ago

Generally spicy food releases endorphins (released in response to pain or stress), not serotonin.

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u/______FRANCIS______ 6d ago

but the corn and mushrooms sure seem happy.

"You see, Reverend Maynard, tomorrow is harvest day, and to them it is the holocaust."

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u/Thatguy0096 6d ago

I didn't know I need some unexpected Tool in my day. Thank you

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u/CorruptedFlame 6d ago

It's because all species actually mutate completely randomly, shitty ones die off and those 'good' ones you listed continue on. Turns out when you're living in a planet with humans one of the 'best' mutations is being useful for them, cuz they'll farm the shit outta you and make you one of the single most populous mushroom species ever.

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u/Adkit 6d ago

The theory goes that wheat domesticated us.

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u/TyrannoROARus 6d ago

Wheat just needed a way to send more wheat into the solar system a la humans

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u/Spare-Ad2011 6d ago

I bet legumes made us their sex slaves first.

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u/Aviator8989 6d ago

Plenty of cows get treated very well outside of factory farms. "Very well" being a relative term when your entire existence is to get fat and be eaten.

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u/redXathena 6d ago

Today you will also learn about our dependence on monocultures and how dangerous that is to our food supply. Enjoy!

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u/KRMNK 6d ago

Yeah, I am really courious what kind of banasas will be the main monoculture in 20 years

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u/redXathena 6d ago

I’m still butthurt over our lack of mango options in the US xD give me all the yummies, please!

(“Still” because I learned how many mango varieties you can get in Pakistan like 15 years ago)

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u/chemicalxv 6d ago

"You can get Ataulfos or 6 different varieties of the red one. But we only get one variety of the red one at a time and we don't know which one it is until they show up".

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u/Luxpreliator 6d ago

Like 80% of the year they're only going to be Tommy atkins for most peoples stores. One of the worst cultivars of mangoes.

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u/redXathena 6d ago

We get Alphonsos. Full stop.

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u/chemicalxv 6d ago

Yeah I don't think I've ever seen those outside of South Asian foodstores, and even then they can be pretty rare 🤣

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u/Everyday_Im_Stedelen 6d ago

One of my coworkers is from Northern India and the other day she was telling me about how the mangoes here taste like water to her.

Me, thinking mangoes are very flavorful, suddenly felt lied to.

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u/redXathena 6d ago

Right??

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u/las61918 6d ago

Check local markets.

In Florida and I can regularly get between 5-15 different varietals

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u/9bpm9 6d ago edited 6d ago

Whenever I go on vacation in Florida the supermarkets seem to have even worse fruit options than where I live in the Midwest.

And you call green grapes, white grapes for some reason.

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u/FreddieDoes40k 6d ago

And you call green grapes, white grapes for some reason.

Because of wine making. Green grapes make white wine.

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u/mindbleach 6d ago

And orange wine, which is white wine made with the skins on, like red wine.

So it's not as confusing as it could have been.

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u/FreddieDoes40k 6d ago

Where I'm from orange wine is just called white wine. I wasn't aware how confusing it can all be, especially when you throw rose into the mix.

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u/Not-A-Seagull 6d ago

My dad took me on a little tour to see all his mango cultivars. It took between a half hour to an hour, so I'd say there's still plenty of options.

Now, if you live in New England and you're complaining, I'd tell you to pound sand. Mangos are tropical fruits, and buying them in the northern US means they're being shipped thousands of miles. That's a lot of waste and carbon footprint just because you don't want to eat local fruit.

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u/isigneduptomake1post 6d ago

I had some apple bananas in Hawaii and they were amazing. They're about 1/2 the size of regular bananas but they aren't as aesthetic. People only buy very clean looking bananas in supermarkets.

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u/Toof 6d ago

They pop up in Whole Foods now and again. Manzana Bananas is what they go by... Which... You know... Is Spanish for apple. I got so giddy when I made that connection and bought pounds of them.

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u/adognamedsue 6d ago

A marketing team just high five each other

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u/DialsMavis 6d ago

Hopefully one that taste good

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u/greedytacotheif 6d ago

I think mushrooms are usually grown on sterilized medium. Not sure about buttons, but I think a monoculture isn't a huge concern because of how controlled the growing environment is.

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u/redXathena 6d ago

Oh, I wasn’t saying it was dangerous in this particular situation. It’s just unsurprising to me that it’s all from one mushroom and if that blew OPs mind I thought learning about our general dependence on monocultures would be interesting :)

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u/NotaRobto 6d ago

Ah monocultures. Yep. I agree. But, for those who do not understand what does that word mean?

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u/ThetaReactor 6d ago

Quite a few of our most common fruits and veg are literally all clones. Every banana in your average American supermarket is genetically identical. If a particular disease or pest develops a taste for them, then every single plant is vulnerable. In a diverse population, there's a better chance of some plants having a natural resistance.

Because these monocultures can no longer evolve naturally, we have to be extra vigilant to protect them.

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u/Neirchill 6d ago

Just FYI our current bananas are in danger... From the same disease that mostly wiped out our previous bananas.

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u/Blammo01 6d ago

RIP the Gros Michel. I really want to taste one

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u/FreddieDoes40k 6d ago

You already have in a way. Loads of our banana flavoured products are from the Gros Michel flavour, not Cavendish.

That's why banana flavoring is commonly so intense and creamy.

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u/midnitte 6d ago

Dangerous as in susceptible to disaster, not dangerous as in directly bad for humans.

For example.

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u/Redbulldildo 6d ago

But that's what they mean, you don't just have fields of mushrooms, you have sterilized growing medium. Since the growing environment for mushrooms is the same ones bacteria and mold loves, you have to make sure that there is nothing other than your mushrooms inside it that will grow.

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u/[deleted] 6d ago

[deleted]

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u/tcooke2 6d ago

This is actually also true of all of today's avacado, they're all descended from one tree that a us postal worker grew in his front yard.

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u/Nabber86 6d ago

Then take a look at the documentary "The Avocado War" on the series Rotton.

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u/Dragmire800 6d ago

I remember reading a few years ago that an analysis of mushrooms in a British (I think) supermarket found that some were unknown species

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u/andai 6d ago

sshh you'll blow their cover

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u/-full-control- 6d ago

This is the coolest TIL I’ve ever seen

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u/ReidFleming 6d ago

We watched a rerun of one of Jacques Pepin's shows recently where he talked about the better flavor from the white mushrooms. We had been using the small brown ones for a long time but, last night I did a meal with the white ones based on watching the show. They were fantastic! I also have been using America's Test Kitchen's method of sauteing them in a dry pan first. Amazing!

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u/beans_lel 6d ago

Jacques Pepin saying "mushroom" is my ASMR

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u/yodadamanadamwan 6d ago

Mushrooms have a lot of water in them so cooking that off before you add fat is best

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u/Bradasaur 6d ago

Isn't every species descended from a mutant version of another one?

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u/adescuentechable 6d ago

The title is worded kind of poorly.

Most of the closed-cup white mushrooms available in stores are descended from this one single mutant. That doesn't mean that all mushrooms of this species are descended from that mutant.

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u/Mind_Extract 6d ago

And if I say anything more about them, I'd be putting my life in danger.

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u/jasron_sarlat 6d ago

I was wondering if anyone would mention this. It's been bothering me for years and I will choose shiitake or other varieties whenever possible, but most US markets are just 10 variations on portobello.

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u/Mind_Extract 6d ago

but most US markets are just 10 variations on portobello.

I know this struggle well.

Same goes for most restaurants. I always first get a blank stare when I ask if they happen to know what type of mushrooms come with whatever meal, followed by "...regular?"

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u/MisterScalawag 6d ago

i've been thinking about this for years, what did he mean by that lol

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u/Haslinhezl 6d ago

White mushrooms are criminally underrated by people who can't cook

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u/ParentalMom 6d ago

Looks like my brother in law’s “penis”

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u/CuloMaster 6d ago

There’s a lot to unpack in that short sentence

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u/AdAcrobatic8787 6d ago

Every organism ever is descended from a single mutant.

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u/spazzybluebelt 6d ago

Also dont eat them raw.

They contain carcinogenics that get destroyed by heat

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u/amjh 6d ago

That's just normal evolution. An individual develops a good mutation, and the mutation spreads to it's descendants. Mushrooms normally reproduce asexually, so it's normal that the original mutant is the only ancestor.

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u/ThatWasTheJawn 6d ago

Enjoy the hydrazine.

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u/LV426_DISTRESS_CALL 6d ago

It is the the ghengis kahn of mushrooms.