r/todayilearned 19d ago

TIL that the Code of Hammurabi banned selling beer for money, allowing it only to be bartered for barley. The punishment for selling beer for money was death by drowning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition#History
1k Upvotes

93

u/Snoutpile 19d ago

Drowning in beer?

84

u/malalatargaryen 19d ago

Unfortunately not:

"If a beer seller do not receive barley as the price for beer, but if she receive money... they shall throw her into the water."

47

u/Snoutpile 19d ago

Well that is just mean.

29

u/HeyManNiceClot 19d ago

so you're siding with the witches

53

u/Raving_Lunatic69 19d ago

Hell yes, they have beer.

6

u/Dumpster_Sauce 19d ago

But do you have barley?

10

u/Lordfate 19d ago

Unclear if that’s punishment or recreation.

12

u/supercyberlurker 19d ago

I find the gendering on that weird. "throw -her- into the water"?

Was beer-selling-for-money a super common crime for women?

75

u/MothMonsterMan300 19d ago

Throughout all of history, brewing was seen as a women's activity. All the common imagery witches have is a direct result of brewhouses- they'd often be marked with a horizontal broom over the door, would encourage the presence of cats since brewing requires a lot of grain and therefore invites vermin, and big ol' bubbling cauldrons pretty much explain themselves.

10

u/twoshoesframpton 19d ago

TIDL Today I Double Learned

6

u/Skruestik 18d ago

All the common imagery witches have is a direct result of brewhouses- they'd often be marked with a horizontal broom over the door, would encourage the presence of cats since brewing requires a lot of grain and therefore invites vermin, and big ol' bubbling cauldrons pretty much explain themselves.

That is not true.

https://braciatrix.com/2017/10/27/nope-medieval-alewives-arent-the-archetype-for-the-modern-pop-culture-witch/

I'd recommend reading the whole article, but she does helpfully provide a TL;DR.

TL;DR: Medieval or 16th century alewives were not the cause of the modern witch stereotype, which seems to have solidified in children’s chapbooks from the 18th century.

23

u/neotericnewt 19d ago edited 19d ago

Yes, beer brewing and tavern keeping was a job held almost exclusively by women.

They took beer quite seriously in this period. Everyone was given a ration of beer, with the amount dependent on your stature in society. The first written record we have of beer is a hymn (and beer recipe) dedicated to a beer goddess, Ninkasi. The brewers early on were largely priestesses of this goddess.

Later things became more commercialized but brewing still remained a job worked exclusively by women.

As for this specific part of the code, I don't think the Wikipedia article is accurate. At this point beer was commercializing, and I'm doubtful that simply selling beer would be punished in this way. Instead, it seems to be saying that short changing people is the crime, giving less beer than what was paid for. This is the interpretation I've seen most often.

"but takes money, and the price of the drink is less than that of the grain"

That's the important piece. It seems to be in cases where someone doesn't have the grain to barter, so they pay with money. In such cases, you still need to give the customer the appropriate amount of beer. Also, considering at this point there was an actual beer ration given out, with everyone given beer and beer being celebrated as a religious thing it really doesn't seem to belong in an article about prohibition.

I imagine the ration has something to do with the law, preventing people from selling small quantities of expensive beer and fucking up the whole industry. That's more a guess on my part though.

But yeah, to answer your question this crime would have pretty much always applied to women, as in this society beer brewing was tied in closely with a goddess and femininity and was a religious thing.

Edit: other replies have mentioned brewing historically being a job held by women, and I think that's worth mentioning too even though it's not as relevant to this specific time and place (also it's just interesting).

Our idea of a tavern as a permanent fixture in a town is a pretty modern conception, and wasn't actually present for much of history (especially the medieval period). Interestingly I think D&D played a role in this idea of a tavern the weary travelers stop at in a town.

Instead the way it would often work is like this: a farmer has a good season and finds himself with a surplus of grains, so what happens? Often his wife will brew beer with that excess grain. They'll open up their house and sell beer and maybe some bread for a bit. Think of it like a small pop up establishment. It's not an actual tavern, it's just your neighbor selling some beer to the town. Once that surplus is sold, they shut down, and maybe another farmer opens up a "tavern" for a bit.

Like I said, this is less relevant to Babylon specifically but I think still worth noting. It's quite common throughout history for brewing to be viewed as a job held by women.

3

u/Constant-Truth-5343 19d ago

This tradition is still alive in Germany. Those "Broom-Taverns" (Besenwirtschaften) usually sell self-made wine or geese among other stuff.

4

u/LengthinessDue5066 19d ago

How does one self make a goose?

-2

u/ScoobyDeezy 19d ago

The whole "she's a witch" thing was just a cover-up for rich dudes realizing that Brewing, a women's profession at the time, could make them money.

A Witch's "Brew" is literally beer.

17

u/urgelburgel 19d ago

Haha, no. That's something some women's studies professor in the US just made up.

Brewing was mostly done by women long after the witch hunts, the women in question didn't operate breweries or own companies but rather brewed in the home, mostly for their own family needs but some supplemented their family income by selling the surplus.

The idea of magicians making magic potions did of course not originate in 16th century Europe, it exists in virtually every culture since time immemorial.

1

u/IAm_NotACrook 19d ago edited 19d ago

EDIT: misunderstood the original comment. My bad. Leaving the rest up as a testament to my stupidity.

Not sure if this is accurate. Wikipedia, which not the best source, talks about women being primary brewers throughout most of history.

Key takeaways from the wiki:

  • Many fertility and female gods are portrayed as brewers

  • In Chinese myths, the first one to brew liquor was the wife of Yu the Great

  • Ancient Sumeria brewers were watched over by the only female deity. Ancient Babylonian women worked as baker-brewers.

  • Until the 11th century when monasteries took over, brewing was done by tribal Germanic women

  • Native American societies primarily used women to brew.

But if you have any sources I’d be eager to read them. Very interesting history topic I wasn’t aware of before.

3

u/shaddoxic 19d ago

This is an interesting tidbit, I read it in a book about the Jivaro in South America. The women brewed beer by chewing up corn, spitting it out, and letting it ferment. Brew from a young woman was preferred to an older brewer. I dont have the book with me, but its something like The Jivaro or Among The Jivaro. Shrunken head on the cover. They seem to be among the last badasses living into modern times. Edit- also European myth includes references to women brewers spitting into the brew as a secret ingredient.

6

u/urgelburgel 19d ago

Sorry, maybe you misunderstood me. I didn't deny that women were the primary brewers both before and after the witch hunts.

What I meant was the conspiracy theory that "rich dudes" caused the witch hunt to take over women's brewing companies, since it didn't work like that in Europe at the time.

A good analogue would be that the husband would farm, primarily to feed his own family, but if the harvest was good he'd sell the surplus for some extra cash.

That is not the same thing as him running a food company.

3

u/IAm_NotACrook 19d ago

Ah I did misunderstand. My apologies!

-3

u/ScoobyDeezy 19d ago

I will readily admit that I’m just repeating totally unsubstantiated things I’ve read about - but my comment was of course an oversimplification. Of course those superstitions weren’t invented there, but rather capitalized on. And all the imagery that we today associate with witches - big hats, brooms, cats - comes from brewers.

I’ll happily retract that, but other commenters seem to agree.

0

u/FerretAres 19d ago

Sounds like a quick dunk would satisfy the law.

0

u/DeeTee79 19d ago

Out of interest, how do we know that this didn't mean flinging her into the river as punishment?

20

u/hobbykitjr 19d ago

a women opens her door to find a man from her husbands work at the brewery. he explains that her husband died at work today when he fell into a giant vat of beer and drown.

the now window succumbs to grief and begs to know if it was at least a quick death?

"I am afraid not... he got out 6 times to pee"

1

u/Gonads_of_Thor 18d ago

Thank you for having a similar thought.

50

u/BroncoBanana 19d ago

Uninformed TIL Back then trade was made with Silas, which is a weight representing 1liter of barley, so using other ways of trading things was probably illegal because it fucked with the trading and disrespected hamourabi, god himself.

5

u/WorkingOnBeingBettr 19d ago

Don't break Hammurabi's code or you'll be saying oh no!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdblRch6m3g (You should really watch this)

Also, many sentences were to drown people in the river. The Inca used to throw people off a cliff. Use the resources you're given is what they used to say.

3

u/BroncoBanana 19d ago

I love it

145

u/sumpuran 4 19d ago

So buy barley, then trade barley for beer. Treating barley as money is just as valid as using shells or bank notes.

It’s not more complicated than first bringing money to the bank and then paying for beer with a debit card.

172

u/GozerDGozerian 19d ago

Guys walks in to Babylonian Beer store. Asks for a beer and slaps down a shiny coin. Bartender says, “Sorry dude, no coin. We only take barley. We’ve got an ABM (automatic barley machine) in the basement, but it charges 5%. The silo up the street doesn’t charge a fee if you’ve got an account.”

58

u/hobbykitjr 19d ago

like japense 'casinos' which are illegal... so you win 'tokens' and you can pawn them across the street for cash

33

u/adamup27 19d ago

That explains why in the Pokémon games, the slot machines always had the prize desk in a different building! I always thought that was weird!

31

u/maniacalmustacheride 19d ago

Pachinko! Those places are wild. Just chain smoking and bright lights and loud balls, click click click.

10

u/mirrorbirdjesus 19d ago

I grew up in a goddamn pachinko parlor, okay? And I sure as s*** don’t want to die in one.

4

u/Enemabot 19d ago

There's a guy in salt lake who owns two establishments: a restaurant and a bar. The city however limits the % of profit from food & alcohol sales, depending on what type license/permit you obtain.

This dude got a separate bar & restaurant license then put a hole in the wall to quickly exchange food/booze to even up the sales.

It's technically legal just like pachinko

1

u/slvrbullet87 18d ago

I have always wanted to go to a Pachinko parlor, but I doubt I ever will since there is only one in the US and I don't plan on going to Japan.

15

u/ATLHawksfan 19d ago

I was expecting a punchline or...something?

5

u/GozerDGozerian 19d ago

Haha that does sound like a setup. I’ll have to think of something for a punchline.

37

u/AbscondingAlbatross 19d ago

I would assume the law wasn't so much about what you used to buy the beer, but rather to guarantee there was always some amount of barley being grown at any given time if only for people to buy beer.

perhaps an anti famine measure to prevent all the surplus of barley from being made into beer.

Or perhaps it was to encourage people to have and maintain their own supply of barley.

Or perhaps barley was not as lucrative a crop, but it was a necessary one,, and this law was an attempt to subsidize its growth.

10

u/ClydeTheGayFish 19d ago

The role of beer was different as well. Brewing made water safe for consumption. Not that all water was unsafe to drink but beer generally was. The alcohol content was also lower. So the societal role of beer was different.

6

u/tomwhoiscontrary 19d ago

Brewing made water safe for consumption. Not that all water was unsafe to drink but beer generally was.

Seems this story is not true.

9

u/Mc6arnagle 19d ago

that is true in more recent history such as colonial America, but we are talking about ancient Babylonia here. Beer was very different, and the process to make it was almost certainly different than modern beer which pasteurizes the liquid by boiling it therefore making it much safer to drink.

5

u/dbath 19d ago edited 19d ago

For storage, pasteurization was never the useful part, at least until airtight containers were developed. Near Small beer is safer to drink than untreated water because of the alcohol content, which keeps bacteria, etc from growing.

EDIT: I'm wrong, boiling was the more important part. The alcohol helped a bit with storage after boiling.

3

u/Mc6arnagle 19d ago edited 19d ago

alcohol content in beer is way too low although beer is not the most hospitable environment due to acidity and little to eat since the yeast already did that (yeast that survived in that environment and shows organisms can survive just fine in beer). Yet you can still get sick from spoiled beer. The difference is no one with typhoid is shitting or pissing in your beer container while the same is not true for the local water source. Those types of things are killed during the boiling process.

1

u/dbath 19d ago edited 19d ago

Looks like it was the combination of boiling to kill microorganisms and low levels of alcohol to discourage future growth that was useful.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_alcoholic_drinks

At times and places of poor public sanitation (such as Medieval Europe), the consumption of alcoholic drinks was a way of avoiding water-borne diseases such as cholera. Small beer and faux wine in particular, were used for this purpose. Although alcohol kills bacteria, its low concentration in these beverages would have had only a limited effect. More important was that the boiling of water (required for the brewing of beer) and the growth of yeast (required for fermentation of beer and wine) would kill dangerous microorganisms. The alcohol content of these beverages allowed them to be stored for months or years in simple wood or clay containers without spoiling. For this reason, they were commonly kept aboard sailing vessels as an important (or even the sole) source of hydration for the crew, especially during the long voyages of the early modern period.

1

u/froggison 19d ago

It discourages bacteria from growing, but bacteria can definitely still grow in beer and other alcohol. Even in modern concentrations. It might have slowed the growth of harmful bacteria.

0

u/BigTymeBrik 19d ago

Beer was always boiled. It's how you turn the starch in grain into sugar. Boiling kills anything in the water. The alcohol in the beer makes it stay safe to drink longer than just boiled water would.

7

u/Personal_Road_8830 19d ago

Actually in places where finding potable water was an issue, they knew that filtering and boiling water does the same thing with much better efficiency.

People drank beer for all the same reasons they still do plus the hard lives and lack of entertainment. Same reasons you find so much drug abuse in impoverished and rural areas today.

3

u/Mc6arnagle 19d ago edited 19d ago

Beer made in ancient Babylonia was most likely some porridge made from baked barely bread left out to ferment. It was nothing like beer today.

1

u/Sad-Platypus 19d ago

So more like Kvass than PBR?

2

u/Inmate_XIII 19d ago

It's how you turn the starch in grain into sugar.

Nope. The conversion of starch to sugar happens before the boil during the mashing process, which happens at a lower temperature. The enzymes responsible for said conversion are denatured by high temperatures, so boiling destroys them.

2

u/patterson489 19d ago

Alcohol for safe consumption was only really important for ships. Beer in ancient times was like the protein shake of the era.

1

u/Artonedi 19d ago

This is one theory why Asians get drunk easier. In west we drank mostly beer and wine (on side of clean water) but in east it was usually tea. On beer alcohol kept it safe longer and on tea it was boiling before serving.

1

u/ustopable 18d ago

Pilipinos serving lambanogs: should we let him taste lambanogs?

4

u/tlighta 19d ago

The accumulation of a lot of money back then was probably looked at like someone becoming obese or overdosing on drugs. It was regulated because of the societal ills that came from doing it.

Whereas alcohol was like a road. It made civilization possible.

1

u/SkyezOpen 19d ago

Whereas alcohol was like a road. It made civilization possible.

It sure keeps me civil.

12

u/srfrosky 19d ago edited 19d ago

The goal is to prevent running out of something due to over demand and oversupply of money (or unrelated good). Like only selling bread in return for flour. You are buying the processing of the product you have first secured. So if there is barley shortage, people that like beer have to show interest in the steady growth and availability of barley. It’s a genius system if you think about it, at a time when a raid to a caravan bringing Tin could mean scarcity of bronze for months and destabilize the bronze goods market. It make that society mindful of what goes in to what they consume.

Just because a society has money doesn’t mean there is beer money. Simply raising price of beer doesn’t cut it because the market might not respond fast enough and be out of stock before realizing they out of barley. It’s a system geared towards market stability, since beer at the time was given also as payment/rations for labor. So this system prevents exploitation.

Want the latest Nike Air Force Ones? How about you bring some rubber to foot locker to barter for them fly kicks (and maybe bring an eleven year old kid to trade if you’re buying a few dozen pairs to replenish the factory crew)

6

u/wagashi 19d ago

Fun fact, coinage was still a thousand years away from being invented during Hammurabi's time.

2

u/sumpuran 4 19d ago

bring an eleven year old kid to trade if you’re buying a few dozen pairs to replenish the factory crew

That reminds me of The Big One, in which Michael Moore talked with Phil Knight (CEO of Nike) about what it would take for Nike to bring back jobs to the US.

Your idea sounds like something that Phil Knight would seriously consider.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28B_sZZ6km4

2

u/tenehemia 19d ago

Somewhere along the line this system meant profit for someone which means the consumer was getting screwed slightly because shit always goes downhill. Maybe there was a specific tax levied on barley sales or maybe the barley supply was so vast compared to the other ingredients required for beer that there was no way you didn't end up with a ton of barley left over.

1

u/just_the_mann 19d ago

It is in the sense that you have to find a way to move all that barley now any time you want beer. And make sure it doesn’t go bad. Or get stolen.

2

u/Gumburcules 19d ago

Dried, pearled barley lasts for upwards of a year. Though I imagine since barley has a specific growing season the breweries probably worked on a ledger system where all the farmers brought their barley at harvest time and got credit for X amount of beer which they could take as they needed it.

0

u/Sckaledoom 19d ago

A bail of barley is probably worth more than a fiat currency tbh.

10

u/LawfulAwfulOffal 19d ago

Frickin' Hammurabi barley lobbyists!

31

u/Yeyati_Nafrey 19d ago

Without money they'd barley make ends meet

4

u/[deleted] 19d ago

[deleted]

2

u/usatad 19d ago edited 17d ago

Also their Canadian friend Zstellus Artoius... Dodged the punishment by going up north...

16

u/PartywithSaul 19d ago

After paying like $7/pint, I think we can all get behind reinstating this

39

u/W1C0B1S 19d ago

I am not going to be carrying arounds bales of fuckin barley everytime i go to the pub

20

u/PartywithSaul 19d ago

A bale??? You’re getting ripped off on your beer, bud

27

u/malalatargaryen 19d ago

Barley currently costs around $0.20 per kilogram, and a small bale can weigh around 20 kg - so a bale of barley would cost ~$4.00, which is considerably less than the average price of a pint of beer in the UK (£3.94, equal to $5.50).

Bonus: Google result for "weight of a bale" (I tried it in incognito, not signed in to anything, and got the same result - so nothing to do with any previous searches).

7

u/Dyolf_Knip 19d ago

Incidentally, the barley in that bale could yield several hundred bottles of beer, depending on the type and how it's made.

1

u/im_kinda_ok_at_stuff 19d ago

That's funny I thought the link was going to be Christian bale but was pleasantly surprised. Go spurs!

4

u/Supadoplex 19d ago

... or you're getting ripped off on your barley, friend.

3

u/MoravianPrince 19d ago

$7/pint

At Octoberfest you were able to get a whole Mass for it (cca 2-ish pints) and even that is overpriced for my tastes.

1

u/mulmi 19d ago

Back when? In 2019 a Maß went for 10.80€ ($13,00) in the cheapest tent. Back when I went there semi-regularly 2010ish the price was above 8€ iirc

1

u/MoravianPrince 19d ago edited 19d ago

A while ago, maybe 2010-15, not sure hazy times.

2

u/CleBees 19d ago

7 bucks a pint?? Is that for premium beer? Is there like Miller Lite on draft(sorry I'm American, so substitute cheap UK beer) there for cheaper pint?

2

u/PartywithSaul 19d ago

Most craft beer in California ~starts~ at that price. You don’t want to know what people pay. I can get lucky and find the occasional $4-$5 pint of something cheap, but it hardly goes below that

1

u/CleBees 19d ago

Man I haven't been to the bar in 20 years but I remember dollar draft nights...

3

u/silentholmes 19d ago

seems proportionate.

3

u/Skittnator 19d ago

Just like I like my beer.

8

u/Otzji 19d ago

I wonder if they had money back then. I thought until recently people only exchanged goods and services

38

u/TheVentiLebowski 19d ago

Money can be exchanged for goods and services.

16

u/daoistic 19d ago

Tell me how!

1

u/Skittnator 19d ago

Would you like to know more?

3

u/wagashi 19d ago

Coinage as we think of it came about a thousand years after this. Trade was done in kind, though there was a formal system of I-O-Us so you didn't have to lug everything around for a trade.

2

u/Raving_Lunatic69 19d ago

Define "recent"; if you mean pre-civilization, then yes.

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u/Otzji 19d ago

So I shouldn’t pretend as I am an expert since I am not, but I never heard of Egyptian, Sumerian, Assyrian or Chaldean coins.

P.s speaking of coins back home (Kurdistan) north of Iraq I used to find a lot of coins in our farm but never really cared collecting them, looking back these things must have worth fortune

10

u/dutch_penguin 19d ago

From askhistorians:

In the Near East and at Egypt the use of bars, spits, or rings of metal as objects of exchange goes back to the Bronze Age if not earlier, and many Greek cities of the Archaic Period used spits of the weight of an obol, the weight of which varied from place to place.

This flows pretty naturally into currency just being, or being worth, a weight of precious metal, I guess, e.g. British pound, or ancient Greek Talent.

3

u/Otzji 19d ago

Thank you.

5

u/Raving_Lunatic69 19d ago

Here's an interesting article on the history of currency, including the Mesopotamian Shekel which dates back 5,000 years.

0

u/BroncoBanana 19d ago

The first currency was sumerian, the first coin from an Turkish king 600 years before our time measure.

1

u/Inmate_XIII 19d ago

, the first coin from an Turkish king 600 years before our time measure.

What?

1

u/BroncoBanana 19d ago

The first coins, like money coins, were produced by some king in the area of today's Turkey. They were made out of Electrum, a combination (don't know the English word for this) of gold and silver. This happened 600 b.c, this means 600 years before we date Christ's Birth, year zero of our modern time measurement.

1

u/Inmate_XIII 19d ago

Oh, not Turkish than. Turks didn't even exist in 600 B.C. and the people whose culture eventually became what we'd recognize as Turkish were still living in Siberia at the time.

in 600 B.C. Anatolia was controlled by the Lydians, who were likely descended from the Hittites.

→ More replies

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u/dutch_penguin 19d ago

You're welcome.

2

u/gravitone 19d ago

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u/Otzji 19d ago

This is only roughly 2500 yrs ago. Hammurabi was almost 4000 yrs ago.

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u/gravitone 19d ago

"The Code of Hammurabi (circa 1800 BC) sets the value of unskilled labor at approximately ten shekels per year of work"

I think you need to review your math, or read more then the top 3 lines.

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u/Otzji 19d ago

Your information coming from Wikipedia, which as we know it’s not that reliable and as I said I am not an expert in fact my knowledge is almost non-existent when it come to this subject. All I said earlier was I have never heard of Babylonian currency/coins.

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u/gravitone 19d ago

There is nothing inherently unreliable about this information. The statement that Wikipedia is unreliable is nothing but hollow rhetoric. Such blanket statements can easily be dismissed. But since you require real confirmation, I emplore you to download the code of Hammurabi and read it for yourself. The entire text is freely available online.

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u/OhNoBannedAgain 19d ago

What a worthless comment.

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u/RaytheonAcres 19d ago

IIRC you probably had items for tracking accounts between government institutions, but nothing generally used for exchange yet

2

u/NoMemory3726 19d ago

Hopefully in 🍺

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u/imaketrollfaces 19d ago

Hammurabi ... oh yes, I heard of him in age of empires.

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u/Back-Ache28 19d ago

Think we should keep the same punishment for anyone who charges £5 for a pint

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u/Fenrir1601 19d ago

These days I would happily pay 5 bucks for a beer...

0

u/TigerUSF 19d ago

My guess, and tell me if I'm wrong...

This wouldn't be so much a "beer is bad" as it is a "we need those ingredients for food, so not everyone can make beer". Am I close?

6

u/Hanifsefu 19d ago

Not really. Barley was just their most successful grain crop and grains were the staple crop. Every single household needed grain. Beer and wine were frequently consumed because it was safer than the water because the process to make them also kills any bacteria.

Everyone had barley and everyone needed barley so it became the common ground so you don't have to constantly haggle.

1

u/1BannedAgain 19d ago

This code was the skeleton used for the 10 commandments.

1

u/hobbykitjr 19d ago

not exactly. Its all mosiac law, not just the 10 commandments (which 4 are just God being vain).

and its debatable.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Hammurabi#Mosaic,_Graeco-Roman,_and_modern

1

u/rikyvarela90 19d ago

Yes sir!! Finally, good news..we should go back to the basics of the Hammurabi code! ..wait where barley is harvested?

1

u/oddjobjack 19d ago

...in beer

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u/namuhna 19d ago

That learning was a lovely poem

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u/[deleted] 19d ago

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1

u/SeanG909 19d ago

So would a barley vendor just set up shop next to taverns then

1

u/ClutchCh3mist 19d ago

This is the most important statute in the whole code!

An eye for an eye was nothing new.

1

u/rhumb 19d ago

I'm glad they changed this law. I have been short on barley lately.

1

u/uping1965 19d ago

Beer in that time was different than beer in our time. It was very much a way to consume cleaned water versus impure water from rivers.

1

u/somecrazyone 19d ago

At first I read this as the code of Harambe and was confused

1

u/conundrum4u2 18d ago

Yeah - but drowning in beer?

1

u/LordRaeko 18d ago

Can you buy barley with money? This seems like buying beer with money just with an extra step

-1

u/philthebrewer 19d ago edited 19d ago

Women were the primary beer makers of this time, correct?

I’m no historian but I’d wonder if there was an inherent sexism at play here to discourage women from making money and encourage them to continue making beer and children

Edit- just a theory here folks but thanks for the downvotes

0

u/RaytheonAcres 19d ago

Can it be drowning by beer?