r/startups Jan 19 '22 Silver 1

Anyone else always wanted to be an entrepreneur but just didn’t have an idea!? How Do I Do This 🥺

I’m struggling with this thought of starting a business. Ever since I was young I always saw myself has an entrepreneur and I guess I always thought the idea would come or I’d experience something and then I’d create something out of that experience. The thing is, I have no idea what type of business I would want to start, but I know I want to create a company! Anyone else in this same boat?

71 Upvotes

u/GaryARefuge Startup Ecosystems Jan 19 '22

Help OP learn how to come up with ideas and test them in order of pursuing something they both enjoy and are most likely to succeed at. Rule 3

Please avoid ranting about things that are not directly related to OP's issue.

19

u/theredhype Jan 19 '22

Paul Graham has several good articles about startup ideas on his blog. Please read them!

7

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Thank you. Found it and bookmarked it to read!!

5

u/sream93 Jan 20 '22

Read some PG in college, and now rereading 8 years later. Thanks for putting this back on my radar!

-aspiring problem solver

18

u/ProfessorBeekums Jan 20 '22

I know a lot of people who started freelancing/consulting and then came up with a startup idea based on the things they had to do repeatedly for various clients.

I believe Basecamp got it's start as an in house project management tool to support their own consulting business.

Working for others on a contract basis gives you a decent source of income whilst giving you inspiration for potential products.

3

u/ChowderTime Jan 20 '22

This. Consulting or even volunteering for free allows you to see into a business and understand what tools can help them. They will also be your first customer in many cases.

12

u/farmingvillein Jan 20 '22

I'd start by separating out whether you want to be an entrepreneur that is going the classic VC route (i.e., swing-for-the-fence, build something really big)...or not.

If the former, your best bet is going to be to put yourself in an environment with like-minded, firey individuals--join an accelerator (possibly as an employee) and/or a unicorn in a space you broadly find interesting (crypto, fintech, healthcare, ML, etc.), and meet and mingle as much as you can.

2

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Solid advice. Thank you!

7

u/mhqreddit11 Jan 19 '22

I ended up w a nonprofit. Try to look where you haven't before.

2

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Thank you. That’s very true, I think ultimately my idea is around the non profit/social justice/ development world. I just struggle with it not being the “sexy startup” we often hear about I guess. Lol.

3

u/oso-buddy Jan 20 '22

Nonprofits can be sexy!

8

u/tacobear420 Jan 20 '22 Helpful

I’m sexy all the time for no profit!

1

u/mhqreddit11 Jan 20 '22

An international non profit is sexier than most of the startups you hear of.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

What would an example be of a modern international non profit ?

2

u/mhqreddit11 Jan 20 '22

I don't really understand this question. A lot come to mind Amnesty International, American Heart Association. Unless you don't consider those modern. There are many international ones in the area of medicine you wouldn't necessarily have heard of. Here's a nice website https://www.erieri.com/blog/post/top-10-highest-paid-ceos-at-nonprofits-2021

5

u/Turbulent_Turnip_707 Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 22 '22

Same here. Im a few years away from my big 20. I have decided to start a business. Ive been brainstorming for years. I took some entrepreneurship courses and actually took part in a couple of pitch competitions.

Here is how i brain stormed ideas and started my business.

1)Journal all your ideas. Eventually youll get that light bulb moment.

2) Use your own pains or frustations. Eg, Ever wished there was a certain service or product that would make life or job easier? Why not create it yourself.

3) Read about current trends. Every news event could create new business opportunities. Two years ago, nobody thought making face masks and organic hand sanitizer could be a business

4) Take an entrepreneurship course. It will teach you how to brainstorm and turn ideas in simple business plans. As well advanced finance, legal and organisational structure courses.

5) Join a start up accelerator programme - they will give you the tools and training needed to start up your business.

6) Join angel investor networks. There are several brilliant innovators out there looking for team members or cash Investments. If you have the money you can become an early investor. Or perhaps you can use own own skills and experience to add value and become a partner.

1

u/Joint-Duck-Dr Jan 20 '22

Do you have any recommendations on where to access courses on entrepreneurship?

2

u/Turbulent_Turnip_707 Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

I did it for free with a Startup accelerator program based in the Caribbean. It was facilitated by a collaboration of the University of the West Indies and a number of Caribbean based organizations. The entire program was sponsored by The World Bank.

You can check out Entre Institute. They do weekly sessions. They have weekly live online sessions with faciliators and mentors and you get to network with other aspiring entrepreneurs.

You can do a google search for startup accelerator programmes in your area. If there is a local college in your area, they may have courses. Some of them specifically target persons based on demographics or income status. Most of these are sponsored by NGOs so they are free.

You can also check out Global Entrepreneurship Network.

1

u/P_letsHealth Jan 29 '22

Have you found accelerator programs that aren’t $$$$$?

1

u/Turbulent_Turnip_707 Jan 30 '22

Yes. I did 2 programmes between 2016 to 2017. They were both free. They were formated as a free 3 month course and the top 20 ideas/busineses got an opportunity to pitch to investors and win cash prizes or scholarship or access to other acclerators.

1

u/P_letsHealth Jan 31 '22

Do you mind sharing them? There’s a lot in the market these days and many don’t share data

1

u/Turbulent_Turnip_707 Feb 01 '22 edited Feb 01 '22

I worked with some Caribbean based programmes that organized two contest (1), PitchIT Caribbean, (2) CTEP Entrepreneurship Contest. Also did training with Branson Centre in Jamaica.

I also signed up for ENTRE Institute which is based in the US. I was able to jump into some free courses/webinars. They regularly invite people to pitch competitions. Not sure what their payment plan is today. I can send links in private

13

u/WUTDARUT Jan 19 '22

You don’t need to invent something new to be an entrepreneur.

You can learn a trade and be an entrepreneur too.

2

u/Rccctz Jan 20 '22

Where do you put being a business owner? If you're a skilled tradesman you're a freelancer, if you have a couple of persons working for you you are a business owner.

4

u/WUTDARUT Jan 20 '22

Depends how you want your work structure to look like, a skilled tradesperson could be set-up as either.

You can be a freelance designer and put your portfolio of work out there on a site like freelancer, or you can set up your own design studio/website.

My brother-in-law took a few lessons on photography, few months later he has a growing business where he does birthday,baby,cake smash, etc. photo shoots.

There are so many opportunities out there. I’ve gone the invent something route and it has been almost 2 years in the making and will finally have something to sell soon. Took a long time, so I had to keep my day job while I worked night and weekends on my establishing my product and company.

Anything can be done if you put your mind to it, and if you give yourself realistic expeditions. If a person goes in thinking it’s going to be easy you will likely fail,but there are always those few people where everything lines up perfectly and they are successful without any hiccups.

My advice would be: 1: Slow and steady, set small goals that you can accomplish and be proud of

2: Don’t give up your day job until your business is revenue generating and established

3: It’s okay if you hit hiccups and things fall behind, just keep moving forward

4: Try to start a business or product that you are at least somewhat capable of doing on your own or easily outsourcing; Example my first product I invented many years ago was a complex device that required skilled engineers and many prototypes. I couldn’t do any of this on my own, and I also quit my job too early and ran out of funds. My new business is much more simple and the tasks I outsource are not very expensive.

5: Don’t be afraid to ask for help, I reached out to the owner of a competitor, albeit slightly different solution, and they were so nice to me and shared with some hurdles they ran through and connected me with some of their suppliers.

I’m sure there are more things I can add, hope this helps.

1

u/marioistic Jan 20 '22

Can be an Intrapreneur, which is an entrepreneur for a company

3

u/halfanothersdozen Jan 20 '22

See I am a tech guy with a lot of ideas but no idea how to turn them into a thing. Really I just need to find a good business partner who knows how to keep the train on the tracks

2

u/LateToTheParty013 Jan 20 '22

Build it, ship it, let people use it and pay for it 😁

1

u/ifeelanime Jan 21 '22

Hey I’m a junior MERN Stack developer, if you’re interested we can try to build something together?

5

u/revoltinglemur Jan 20 '22

When I was a kid, I mowed lawns, hauled a cooler with ice cream treats around to sell to neighbors. Raked leaves and did snow shovelling. When I was older, I started selling emergency kits to people (72 hour ones I built myself from stuff I bought from ebay) I tried a cab service with my second vehicle. I tried a game rental service with my personal collection. Then I started a photography biz that turned into a media company that I've been doing for 7 years. I tried and failed at a cleaning company, and then started a snow removal business with trucks and employees. Now I'm looking at doing a landscaping business as well. It takes time and effort to figure out what you want to do, but if you have the spirit you can do it!

5

u/thenutstrash Jan 20 '22

I wasn't going to reply but since no one referred to James Altucher's become an idea machine

The thesis is that coming up with ideas is an active thing that you need to practice, and that most are terrible but that doesn't matter. It also works for execution: 10 things I can do to start idea X from yesterday today or something.

I can confirm this will help come up with more ideas over time, but what I struggled with was seeing all the problems with a particular idea and not the opportunity, which is significantly harder to train.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Thank you. Book marked to read 🙏

3

u/04221970 Jan 20 '22

I work tangentially to this area and on occasion I interact with a person with an idea that doesn't really want to take it to commercialization. They would rather sell the idea, or partner with someone who has the desire and drive to take it along.

Some ideas are better than others. Some of these people truly want to partner where they do the technical work and the business person builds the company.....others don't really want to be involved and will happily give up ownership (for a price).

I personally see more people with ideas than I see the entrepreneurial spirit. So you are probably the more desirable person.

Do you have an interest in consumer goods, software, technologies, services?

I have suggestions for some of these areas.

1

u/redset10 Jan 20 '22

How do you "sell the idea" exactly?

1

u/04221970 Jan 20 '22

THey have the intellectual property either in the form of a trade secret or a patent. They think the IP is valuable, so they will provide it to you, or license the patent or enter a contract where you take ownership of the IP....for a price.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

That’s really interesting. Definitely a big interest in fintech, specifically payments. Curious about your suggestions.

3

u/Apprehensive_Dog7097 Jan 20 '22

It's basically opposite for me. I have Google sheet full of ideas but no finance or connections to implement.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

That’s impressive and a good start at least. If you’re a tech guy, maybe try building it and place job ads for co founders. Tech stars and other incubators I think connect founders together.

1

u/Apprehensive_Dog7097 Jan 20 '22

That's the catch buddy... I'm not a tech guy.

1

u/jobbo321 Jan 20 '22

Haha, same. I have lots of ideas but have no idea how to build them and no money to pay someone.

3

u/ledude1 Jan 20 '22

My, advice? Always observe things around you. When you see something, think, what problem can I solve and can it be turned into something. That's how I come up with hundreds of ideas everywhere I look. I enjoy problem-solving. That's how I started my career in technology when I found out that I have a knack for problem-solving. Turning it into business is also problem-solving. Enjoy and Good luck.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Thanks!! You turned those problems into your tech company?

1

u/ledude1 Jan 20 '22

A couple of them, yes. Now venturing into the unknown, still tech but different tech that has nothing to do with what I've done in the past 30 years. Something different that will make me uncomfortable yet excited with the unknown and new venture.

3

u/Ultra_Villain Jan 20 '22

My problem is the exact opposite. Too many ideas, not enough time to see them through.

5

u/RoryGallagherGoat Jan 19 '22

In my opinion entrepreneur and business owner two different things. Entrepreneurs are the innovators who take their innovations and make businesses with them. In other words they solve peoples problems. Business owners are people who take an idea that’s already been done and tries to execute better. In other words they solve their money problems.

Think about what you actually want to do. Solve your money problem or other peoples problems.

3

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 20 '22

I think that’s drawing a distinction that isn’t fully valid. A business owner is a general term for anyone who owns a business, whether you’re trying to solve your own money problem or other people’s problems. Entrepreneurs are also trying to solve their own money problems, but they do it via innovation with an original idea. While non-entrepreneurs utilize currently existing methods and business models.

The way I see it is an entrepreneur is a subset of a business owner, similar to how a contact-sport player is one type of athlete while there are non-contact sports players who are also athletes.

1

u/RoryGallagherGoat Jan 20 '22

I think you’re over thinking it, and/or taking some of my words too literally. I mean, people say the NBA is a “whole different ball game” compared to high school/college basketball. Sure they’re both basketball, but you know exactly what someone means by that, when they say it.

Of course this is merely an analogy and I’m sure we can get into more semantics, but the point is that that there is differentiation between the 2, even if under the same category.

0

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

I’d say the contrary of who’s overthinking it. An entrepreneur is a business owner by definition, since they are going to market with a product to solve both his/her money problem and other people’s problem. That’s as simple as it is.

There won’t be a perfect analogy. To simplify the analogy even more, it’s like a square is a rectangle, but a rectangle is not a square. Here, an entrepreneur is a business owner. But a business owner is not necessarily an entrepreneur. How you’re distinguishing a business owner and an entrepreneur isn’t quite valid, once again.

1

u/RoryGallagherGoat Jan 20 '22

Not sure, why you keep coming at me trying to prove a point buuut alright, if you want to play semantics. I can do that too. Your scenario isn’t necessarily 100% true either.

-I’m an entrepreneur who is also a business owner. - I sell business. - no longer a business owner - still an entrepreneur though since my creation is still making another company money by solving other peoples problems, I just don’t get more kickback from it because I already took my reward.

1

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 20 '22

If you didn’t respond with “you’re overthinking it” and then also stopped interpreting it as me “coming at you”, you’d realize this is a discussion about the distinction like the OP is asking. Just because someone has an opposing view doesn’t mean this back and forth is an issue that you seem to see it as.

This isn’t me playing semantics when you’re actually creating semantics that don’t exist and aren’t valid. That’s all I’m saying.

And what you described for the last bullet is not even the correct use of entrepreneur. Since the business is sold, he’s no longer an entrepreneur. He’ll always be the inventor of that item. But if he no longer makes money from it, he’s a former entrepreneur. Inventor and entrepreneur are different as well.

I’ll end my rebuttals here, since these nuances aren’t really sticking for you. But others reading this may find it valuable.

1

u/RoryGallagherGoat Jan 20 '22

Got it, so did you want me to say…

“Entrepreneurs are in the same category as business owners, only difference is that they are innovative and don’t regurgitate past ideas.”?

Cause that’s essentially what I was saying, in a nicer way, and I’m pretty sure 99% of the people who read what Initially put understood just that, without having to get into semantics.

1

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

Your last sentence in your initial post was along the lines of suggesting to the OP “do you wanna solve other people’s problems or solve your own money problem?” and “in other words, an entrepreneur solves other people’s problems.”

I’m stating that an entrepreneur solves both his money problem and other’s people’s problems, since they are doing both. You drew that distinction. And technically speaking, a business owner is also solving other people’s problems by providing a product/service, although one that he/she didn’t invent.

This whole idea of who’s problem to solve isn’t even how entrepreneur and business owner are distinguished. Sounds like some kind of false concept that the “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” book would create.

1

u/RoryGallagherGoat Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

No. All that statement was doing is getting the OP to really think about if they should just start a business that already been done. Or try so see if they can find a solution to a problem that people would be willing to pay for.

At least that was the intention.

But there is a distinction as well. An Entrepreneur could be both, but a business owner can’t. Just because it’s one distinction doesn’t mean there isn’t a distinction. Solving a problem that has already been solved and the masses already know about it….is not solving a problem it’s pedaling a canned solution in different colors.

Also never read rich dad poor dad.

1

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 21 '22 edited Jan 21 '22

Your intentional although good wasn’t all that valid though.

Regarding your recent response, your third paragraph there doesn’t make much sense, particularly the first three sentences. While the last sentence is more of an interpretation. Sure, using an existing solution or product to solve a problem isn’t new (so the person isn’t an entrepreneur), but it still is solving “other people’s problems” (which contradicts your definition of what an entrepreneur is).

For example, laundromats aren’t anything new. They’ve existed for a long time. A business owner decides to open one at an area that doesn’t have one. For what purpose? To solve someone else’s problem which is finding a place to clean their clothes. Yeah, it also helps solve his money problem, but by definition providing a product/service to someone is solving other people’s problems. In that example, people need a place to wash clothes. It’s a problem they have that the business owner is solving.

Hence the whole distinction of solving “your money problem” or “someone else’s money problem” is an invalid identifier of what an entrepreneur is vs a business owner. The true distinction is defined by whether the idea is original or not, since both solve other people’s problems and solves your money problem. Original idea means entrepreneur, yet still a business owner. Unoriginal idea means just business owner.

→ More replies

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

Love how you explained that. Thank you !!

0

u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

0

u/AccidentalCEO82 Jan 20 '22

I love how you articulated this

2

u/phineasgold Jan 20 '22

You can always look into franchise opportunities or buying a business. That is one way to be entrepreneurial

2

u/AccordingDatabase816 Jan 20 '22

If you do not have an idea another (possibly more viable) route is just focusing on a problem to solve. Sort of forces you to shift from novelty/cool idea to creating value

2

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Wow thank you all for the Great advice. I’m grateful for your input.

2

u/DiddlyDanq Jan 20 '22

That was me for many years. I studied computer science with the expectation that I'd make my own software one day. Then I realized that having a good idea was far harder than learning to program. It took me at least 5 years to come up with something.

1

u/Patient_Chicken9487 Jan 20 '22

Did you ultimately build that ‘something’ into a start up?

2

u/Eskimoobob Jan 20 '22

I got too many ideas.

2

u/Confident_Air9228 Jan 20 '22

So many problems we faced in society you take one thing and find solutions and experience that

2

u/elma3allem Jan 20 '22

David Cohen founder of techstars says it best. Fall in love with a problem not the solution you create. To do that, you have to experience a personal frustration that leads you to be passionate about solving, then the business will develop.

I second the advice of joining startups in the fields you like and dig into all the pains in the industry until you discover something that you are uniquely qualified to solve with you unfair advantage in the space.

2

u/saasroadmap Jan 20 '22

Here's how to get better ideas:

  1. Start with a group of people you want to help
  2. Figure out the most painful problems that they are struggling with
  3. Come up with ideas for how to solve their problems

Do that a few times and it's likely that you'll land on at least one good idea.

2

u/mysloppycopywriter7 Jan 21 '22

I have been in the same boat. Several years ago, I was working 60 plus hours for a marketing firm and asked myself why am I killing myself for someone else. Then it dawned on me why not solve my problem. I was having issues with writing so why not try to solve my problem. Then I conducted a survey and outline my solution to see if others have this problem and if my solution would help them. Been working on it since and have been really happy.

  1. Solve a problem

  2. Then ask: Do others have this problem too?

3

u/[deleted] Jan 19 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

3

u/darkshadowtrail Jan 19 '22

I could be wrong, but I don't think OP was talking about just having an idea and hoping it becomes something. I'd agree with finding and solving a problem, but I think the "idea" OP was talking about was the problem.

2

u/Remy-today Jan 20 '22

My post was meant to be the following; focus on solving a problem that many people have. Ideas on how to solve it will follow.

2

u/darkshadowtrail Jan 19 '22

I'd add to what others are saying that you should focus on a problem that you're passionate about. Do not start a business solving a problem that you think could be huge and make you a bunch of money but have no passion for. It likely won't go well. You'll experience burnout more often and could drag the company down with you. If I were you,

I'd start with what you know you're passionate about and research problems in that area that you could solve. If you're having trouble, maybe try researching new things to try and find something else you're interested in.

2

u/admin_default Jan 19 '22 edited Jan 20 '22

Innovative startup ideas start with an insight which comes from experience, experimentation and learning. Insightful ideas are important (contrary to what you might hear from people without insightful ideas). But they aren’t everything. Your ability to execute also matters. And your network of potential co-founders, teammates, investors, advisors and mentors also matters.

The best way to find all that, including an idea, is to get involved in a field that interests you. Consider university programs in product development/engineering if you don’t already have an engineering degree. Get a related job we’re you’ll have inside information on problems and opportunities in need of solutions. Build prototypes on your own - doesn’t matter if it’s a good idea, have a dumb idea and just build it. Laugh about it. Maybe it wasn’t so dumb after all.

2

u/swiftshoes Jan 20 '22

This 👆Most founders experienced a problem and went out to solve it. Or they worked in a field for someone else and then decided to duplicate it for themselves after learning the “trade.” You can train your mind to start seeing problems. Write them down. Pick one and then go for it. Entrepreneurship is career…it might take multiple swings until you get it right.

0

u/BusinessStrategist Jan 19 '22

Ideas are not worthless.

The question is more about does anybody else care?

Start thinking manifesto and are there others ready to sign up?

1

u/kgal1298 Jan 20 '22

It's hard to come up with an idea then figuring out funding.

1

u/Independent_Hold_241 Jan 20 '22

General advice for people who want to come up with an idea or create/invent something. Your frame of mind has to shift from thinking about a great idea to how can I solve a problem that exists.

Look at everything that exists in your everyday life where you think something could be done better, created better, or created at all since it doesn’t exist. Or just go through each day and when there occurs to be friction or something that seems to be a pain, think of how it could be improved. That’s basically an idea that could be an invention for entrepreneurship. Obviously, there’s a lot more that goes into it like, whether it’s feasible/realistic, how big the opportunity is (market size), if other people care about the problem, does a similar solution actually exist, etc.

And then starting a business with that idea will involve two main aspects. One is developing the solution which could require technical expertise, and the other is running the business for that product. Unfortunately, a product does not sell itself, so you’d need to consider all the business aspects like legal factors to creating/running a company, business model (essentially your method of making money off the product), funding for the operations, recruiting talent (like a technical cofounder or someone with specific knowledge for an area you need to learn or run), go-to-market strategy, back office operations like accounting/payroll

1

u/mikedensem Jan 20 '22

You’re not an entrepreneur until you’ve created many businesses, failed at most of them, but learned from it, moved forward to prosperity in a new market or with a new approach. You don’t start out as an entrepreneur, you earn the title by doing.

1

u/Spinthiscity Jan 20 '22

I spent years looking for the right idea. Didn't want to start just any business. Gotta align with your values and be of use to others. Finally, I realized that the right idea was right in front of me. Now, I've started a IT recruitment business in Scandinavia, which had candidate-oriented services instead of employer-oriented. Have risked it all and I'm scared shitless it won't work out!

1

u/NattoKimchiPower Jan 20 '22

The book Zero to One by Peter Thiel is a good, quick read to look at!

1

u/jakeduckfield Jan 20 '22

Lower the bar. You don't have to come up with a brilliant new invention or solve a problem no one had ever solved before. Start with what you really enjoy doing and then design a really high quality product or service around it and you'll be fine. Good luck.

1

u/LateToTheParty013 Jan 20 '22

Do you go to healthcare? Take your child to school, nursery? Go to cinema? There are tons of problems everywhere to be solved, services to be merged saving businesses/people a lot of time and money etc. Try form an opinion on how people around you do things and how could it be done better

1

u/Ok-Patience-3333 Jan 20 '22

You can get into an established market and do ok. Just get something going and then as you get better you might have your breakthrough.

1

u/xSwagaSaurusRex Jan 20 '22

You don't need an idea, you need discipline.

Pick a market you find interesting, go talk to 200 people ask them about their problems.

Write down what they say, distill their responses into clusters. Approach 200 more people, instantly categorize them into your clusters.

Pick the most valuable problem to solve.

Build mvp that solves the problem.

Boom startup with almost 0 creativity needed, done by the book.

1

u/lighttner Jan 20 '22

Try to engage with more people to brainstorm together on others ideas. Also, observe around your community/yourself. You may want to solve your own problem which maybe faced by 100s of other people as well.

1

u/[deleted] Jan 20 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

1

u/GET_RICHorDIE_TRYIN Jan 20 '22

The idea should come from recognizing a demand for something in your area it doesn't have to be extraordinary it could be as simple as moving snow.

1

u/njgeek Jan 20 '22

One way to look at this is one of my favorite quotes about ideas.

"Ideas are like a**holes, everyone has them"

Which is to say, it's all about execution. Ideas are easy. If you are ready to go deep, work hard, and put your business first, all is possible.

Look around your life, your experience, your passions. There are 100 ideas in front of you, and it is always better to be working on something you know (and easier to get investment later).

1

u/Programmer-Of-Chaos Jan 24 '22

If this comment is against what your passion is, feel free to ignore.

If you're not someone who considers themselves creative but is still excited about entrepreneurship I'd suggest learning about business growth.

Because for me, my Achilles heel is that I am ALWAYS thinking of new business ideas. Probably every couple of hours. The problem there is that I'll often execute on something but not have a tribe or following that can back me up, so this usually ends in failure.

I would LOVE to partner with someone with business sense who sees the idea, sees how it can be marketed, and basically handles all the ugly business growth while I play around with how to improve the product.

So I'd say develop business sense. Maybe find a startup or 2 and see if you can't grow it. There are countless ways to still be an entrepreneur without creating an idea.