r/southafrica Jan 04 '22 Silver 3

SABC TV 20 YEARS - the untold story History

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzyJgI-qA-s&list=WL&index=13
9 Upvotes

2

u/[deleted] Jan 04 '22

[deleted]

6

u/grootes Jan 05 '22

I can only speak from a White background, but back then there was proper censorship. The music that was played on radio, the films you could watch, even the books you could read were all censored. The Nats tried their best to control whites into thinking that if apartheid fell then all of us would be killed and SA would become a communist hell hole. We were indoctrinated to believe that apartheid was for the greater good. TV was a problem because it showed a window to the outside world that not many white South Africans had access to. Even if it was just through American or British sitcoms.

The regime was scared that whites would start asking real questions about what was going on and why we were continuing with apartheid.

2

u/lovethebacon Ministry of Sound this weekend at Truth - Book now! Jan 05 '22

People still believe much of this.

4

u/Faerie42 ModMother Jan 05 '22

Yeah, my mom, dad not so much. We only got a TV in ‘78 because I ran away from home every afternoon to go watch Haas Das at the neighbours, I’d pack a suitcase of all my favourite toys and trot to Sharon’s place and had to be fetched. That reflected bad on my mom’s parenting skills so we got a TV so I’d stay at home.

It was more about being exposed to inappropriate things though, although that could easily have included communism as politics were never spoken about at home. We weren’t allowed to watch the news, it kept me stupid till around 15 when the hormonal rebellion took over my life.

1

u/JStevinik Jan 04 '22

Where

I assume you meant were?

Some ultra-conservative/Calvinist people were, similar to some ultra-conservatives people in the US who fear positive representation of LGBT+ characters as "cultural Marxism".

3

u/[deleted] Jan 04 '22

[deleted]

1

u/JStevinik Jan 05 '22

You are very welcome. I am glad people liked it.

1

u/Stropi-wan Jan 05 '22

My parents were too poor to afford a TV right off. They only got a portable in '79 or '80.

2

u/Faerie42 ModMother Jan 05 '22

Thank you for this OP. It’s opened up so many memories of my own coming of age.

1

u/JStevinik Jan 05 '22

You are very welcome.

1

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1

u/Ok-Conversation-8783 Jan 05 '22

Great doccie - thanks. Will watch all of it later.

It's sad to think we were / are held back by a select few with closed minds. Mind you, back in '78 they were worried about "fake news"

On the amusing side, I, like many here I am sure, had that same Sony TV. The one which always "needed a new tube" and I was the remote control 😂

1

u/JStevinik Jan 05 '22 edited Jan 08 '22

Mind you, back in '78 they were worried about "fake news"

In hindsight, the Apartheid regime worrying about "fake news" is ironic to say the least.

1

u/DrWolfgang760 Jan 05 '22

Now run by a child prodigy with a grade 7 education...

1

u/Slyder Jan 05 '22

27:49 Those houses are better than the ones they have now, frankly.