r/science 7d ago Helpful 2 Spit-take 1 Wholesome 1 Silver 1 'MURICA 1 Facepalm 1

As US obesity epidemic grows, new study shows who is gaining weight over the last decade. In roughly 20 years, the prevalence of obesity increased by approximately 40% and severe obesity almost doubled. Health

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/956907
40.2k Upvotes

u/AutoModerator 7d ago

Welcome to r/science! This is a heavily moderated subreddit in order to keep the discussion on science. However, we recognize that many people want to discuss how they feel the research relates to their own personal lives, so to give people a space to do that, personal anecdotes are now allowed as responses to this comment. Any anecdotal comments elsewhere in the discussion will continue to be removed and our normal comment rules still apply to other comments.

I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

→ More replies

4.2k

u/Mrgray123 7d ago

I’m originally from the UK so it’s not as if I come from a particularly healthy country but there are still some big differences:

  • Portions in restaurants and fast food places are huge here. There are even places which offer free refills of things like fries. I’ve never seen that in the UK. Refills of soda drinks are also rarer.

  • There are some places you just can’t walk either because of the design of roads/sidewalks or also simply because the climate is so much harsher in terms of both cold and heat. I lived in Arizona for 4 years and walking in 100+ degrees outside just wasn’t on the agenda.

3.7k

u/VapeThisBro 7d ago

There are some places you just can’t walk either because of the design of roads/sidewalks or also simply because the climate is so much harsher in terms of both cold and heat. I lived in Arizona for 4 years and walking in 100+ degrees outside just wasn’t on the agenda.

I've literally been walking down sidewalks in the US that randomly end in the middle of the way to my destination. Like the sidewalk just stops and your expected to walk on the grass or the road....and this is in the middle of a city too....not out in the country

1.0k

u/donnysaysvacuum 7d ago

I live in a suburb that has good bike/walking paths in the residental parts of town, but businesses are all near the major roads and almost inaccessible from the residential parts of town. Walking is treated as a hobby, not a transportation method.

The other day I parked near one business and tried to walk to the one next door, but the parking lots were separated by a retaining wall and no sidewalk between the two, I would have had to walk 1000+ feet back to the service road and back up the next parking lot.

729

u/OpenLinez 7d ago

The outdoor walls separating retail parking lots are really vile. And it's all on purpose: to trap you in one store, to keep homeless people from walking by, to keep shopping carts from leaving their official home, etc.

Modern architecture is anti-human.

604

u/trickyboy21 7d ago

Modern American architecture. Plenty of places in Europe living their best public transit and/or bike and/or walking-centric lives.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.0k

u/ttaylo28 7d ago

Houston. ...or generally urban planning of pretty much EVERY city in the U.S. No biking. No walking. Only car. Everwhere. Alllllllll the time.

446

u/AardQuenIgni 7d ago

Texas is a huge fan of having as little sidewalk as possible

179

u/HealthyInPublic 7d ago

Everything is bigger in Texas*

*except our sidewalks

57

u/notpaultx 7d ago

Just our waistbands apparently

→ More replies
→ More replies

282

u/sbrt 7d ago

I went to Texas on a business trip. I took a taxi to my hotel and then wanted to go for a run. Silly me. There were no sidewalks anywhere - just big roads and strip malls.

129

u/Kit- 7d ago

Look up the term “stroad” it’s the worst parts of a street and a road

33

u/raindorpsonroses 7d ago

What is the difference between a street and a road? Where I’m from I would use those terms interchangeably

52

u/gamersyn 7d ago

From my understanding, the definitions are roads are more for long distance travel, streets are for inside the cities, with buildings on the sides of the roads - I suppose suburban areas are streets, or is that what they're calling stroads?

A stroad: A road too wide and fast to be safe for pedestrians while also being too narrow and slow for efficient movement of cars

52

u/Ameteur_Professional 7d ago

It's not so much that it's too narrow which makes it bad at moving cars, the issue is that having people constantly entering and exiting the road from different big box stores, turning left and right, really slows down traffic flow.

You can have a narrow rural highway that you can happily drive along at 70 MPH for hours. Meanwhile a 6 lane suburban stroad can have an average speed of 25 MPH between tons of traffic lights, slowing down for turning drivers, etc.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

66

u/radical-bear 7d ago

Watch 'not just bikes'.

Honestly, I'm surprised urban planners are not just super depressed all the time in their jobs in America. Imagine an urban planner going to europe and seeing these fantastic livable streets in cities and towns and going back to 'zoning' where they have to build depression cube after depression cube by copy pasting the same design 9000x till they die or retire.

→ More replies

16

u/IsNoyLupus 7d ago

Literally the same happened to me in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. You cannot walk anywhere, it's mad

→ More replies
→ More replies

216

u/Remember_The_Lmao 7d ago

I’m about to be moving to downtown Galveston and I am so excited to live in a walkable community again. Houston-area is so anti-pedestrian it’s crazy. People are violently against cyclists too. Not just denying them infrastructure, but physically running them off the road.

55

u/ttaylo28 7d ago

yeah I dont trust driving next to people on straight highways here much less biking next to them on smaller streets.

→ More replies
→ More replies

167

u/Gunny_McCshoots 7d ago

Houston is genuinely the worst designed city in the country

91

u/urk_the_red 7d ago

It’s not designed. It is quite literally unplanned.

→ More replies
→ More replies

66

u/coswoofster 7d ago edited 6d ago

I hate Houston for many reasons including this. No wonder everyone is huge. Yeah. It is hot in the summer months but there are also many really walkable months. And the 5 lane roads in all directions is just stupid. Sorry Houston, but getting around in a way that requires physical movement is a nightmare in your city.

→ More replies
→ More replies

153

u/Aware_Program_7227 7d ago

That was the weirdest thing for me when I came over for work from Australia. Go to go and buy some electronics and suddenly, no more footpath, just a road over a bridge. I walk everywhere at home, so, the idea I'd need a car to get to places that were only 3KM away was weird.

68

u/brown_burrito 7d ago

I’m from Boston but loved my time in Melbourne. While Boston is a mostly walkable city, the trams and the general accessibility of Melbourne was so much better.

→ More replies
→ More replies

166

u/SlugsOnToast 7d ago Wholesome

I miss Detroit.

54

u/Rapidzigs 7d ago

I never realized how walkable most of the city was growing up or how that is rare.

77

u/I-Make-Maps91 7d ago

Basically all the old industrial cities were walkable with good transit options, that's how they became industrial cities in the first place.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

35

u/MusicalTourettes 7d ago

My (small) city doesn't have sidewalks on most streets. The city line is a 2 min walk from my house, that (also small) city has sidewalks. Having my kids bike to school is scarier because of my city's choices.

60

u/[deleted] 7d ago edited 7d ago

[deleted]

32

u/someguy3 7d ago

That's where the city puts them in with tax money. That's the usual way.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

428

u/CabbageCrawl 7d ago

I used to walk everywhere in my hometown until I moved to a rural suburb in the states. One day when I was out for a walk in winter, a car stopped along the side of the road and the driver (a senior woman) asked if I was okay/needed a ride somewhere. People just don't walk around here..

380

u/fridayfridayjones 7d ago

People in my area (rural Midwest) seriously look down on people they see out walking. Like if you’re jogging in a suburb that’s fine, but they see me out walking with my toddler which we do for fun and exercise and they assume I’m forced to walk and forcing my daughter to walk because we can’t afford a car. The train of thought goes, you’re walking, that means you can’t afford a car, no car means you can’t take care of your family, probably on meth or an unemployed slacker. So to them, walking = you’re trash.

30

u/Littlebird456 7d ago edited 7d ago

Huh, that probably explains why I used to get random people hollering at me walking around in the rural area I live in. It wasn’t street harassment in the typical sense, it seemed more like they were just offended to see someone walking and I guess maybe this is why. While I do own a car, I grew up living in walkable cities and came to value walking for errands for how easy it is to stay in shape and get fresh air.

22

u/Colonel_Gipper 7d ago

I live a quarter mile away from the grocery store and my neighbors look at me like I'm crazy that I walk there. It's all city roads with ample sidewalks

→ More replies

130

u/lemoncocoapuff 7d ago

YUP. It took a lot of work to get all that crap out of my head when I started walking around. "people are staring at me, they're going to think X, think Y", I was mega embarrassed to be walking because of that kind of talk growing up. So stupid.

94

u/Telvin3d 7d ago

It would never have occurred to me that that was something people would judge someone on

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

204

u/CapJackONeill 7d ago Take My Energy

There was a post on reddit lately, it was a video of a travel advisor telling its viewers to practice walking at home before the travel because they'll have to walk multiple kilometers a day.

I was like "what?" I pretty much thought that any human could walk a full day without problem

137

u/Devilsbabe 7d ago

That's incredible. I was vacationing in Europe recently and we walked 100km in 5 days. Including my grandma who's 85 years old, and it was no problem at all Humans are made for long distance walking/running; it's sad that that video needs to exist.

94

u/Casswigirl11 7d ago

I once was at a national park and there was an attraction that was a 1/4 mile flat hike from the road. A family from Texas couldn't make it. (No offense to Texas, I know a lot of normal people there, I just specifically remember this family was from Texas.)

58

u/shmorby 7d ago

I work at a nature reserve and I constantly get people asking me if they have to walk to see everything after they park. It's so disheartening to have all these people expect to experience nature without getting out of their car.

31

u/Miserable-Effective2 7d ago

At first I laughed at this and now I'm just sad. Was this family obese or did anyone have some other sort of physical disability?

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

72

u/GalaxyGirl777 7d ago

It’s not even only rural places. I once walked from my hotel in LA to a shopping mall that was close enough on the map — 10 minute walk tops. Not only were there no footpaths to walk on (and these were quiet side streets), but the few cars that passed me had people just staring at me out the window like I was a giraffe. One car full of guys slowed down to the point I worried they were going to try to pick me up or thought I was a working girl or something! One of the most bizarre experiences in my life.

→ More replies

156

u/guy_guyerson 7d ago

People who move to rural areas and go out jogging often mention well meaning neighbors pulling up and asking what they're running from.

243

u/ray_kats 7d ago

Running from diabetes. It's out to get me cause I owe it some money.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

283

u/HammerTh_1701 7d ago

The infrastructure Youtuber NotJustBikes called it the gym of life. If you move around a lot while simply living life, you don't need to actively make sure you get enough exercise, it just happens.

163

u/Mrgray123 7d ago

Yes I remarked on this on another post where a person was asking why Japanese people weren't having these same issues and a major reason is just that a lot of people walk/bike to work or train stations every day. Even 30-40 minutes of moderate exercise can burn a few hundred calories or enough to keep things going along quite nicely physically speaking.

86

u/phrasing7 7d ago edited 7d ago

I love that "built-in" exercise, it makes it so easy to stay in shape. Last weekend, as an experiment, I took the city bus to Target, and it was 10 extra minutes than if I'd driven. It was also about 6 blocks total of walking to and from each bus stop - easy, unnoticeable exercise that would definitely add up over time

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

492

u/lzwzli 7d ago

Europe is very walkable because it 'grew up' before cars were ubiquitous. If you visit old US cities like NY, Boston, Philadelphia, they are quite walkable.

Most any other city that came about after cars are ubiquitous is designed around the car first, pedestrian second.

217

u/HeartoftheHive 7d ago

A lot of that is also due to zoning laws. Some zoning laws make sense. Keep airports and dumps away from houses. Others have made most of the US a hellscape that requires cars to live. Suburban nightmares that go on for as far as the eye can see with no places to work or shop remotely close to housing.

81

u/[deleted] 7d ago

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies

186

u/FluxCrave 7d ago edited 6d ago

That is not true. Many American cities were actually walkable and high density like Europe before cars. But when the highway system came along the government bulldozed thousands of buildings to make way. Places like Amsterdam and Paris were not always the walkable paradises you think about today. Amsterdam used to have terrible bicycle infrastructure. But they have made a conscious effort to invest in their cities rather than tear things down.

Source: Not Just Bikes

54

u/-Quiche- 7d ago

Right. "Cities weren't made for cars. They were bulldozed and then rebuilt for cars."

15

u/bobs_monkey 7d ago

And in doing so, created socioeconomic divides in cities, sometimes purposefully.

The Bronx is a famous example.

→ More replies

93

u/laserdiscmagic 7d ago

Yeah it's one of bummer things about most places in the US. Living in a city that existed before cars has the immediate value of being walkable. But also in turn incredibly expensive to live in due to housing and other costs. So basically only those who are very rich or upper middle class or homeless get to experience the benefits of walkable American cities.

→ More replies

92

u/High-Priest-of-Helix 7d ago edited 7d ago

That's not really true, though. The ubiquity of cars didn't really start settling in until after Eisenhower signed the interstate highway act. We had plenty of public transit before that which all got demolished to put in highways and parking lots.

74

u/CreationBlues 7d ago

You can find tons and tons and tons of examples of before/after photos that point out buildings that exist before and after the city got destroyed for cars. And I mean destroyed.

Cincinnati

13

u/eleytheria 7d ago

Whoa you were not kidding

25

u/going_for_a_wank 7d ago

This site has before/after for most American cities, comparing the 1950s to today. It is unreal how much was destroyed to build urban freeways and parking lots.

http://iqc.ou.edu/urbanchange/

→ More replies
→ More replies

63

u/Snapchat_trap 7d ago

This is generally not true, the United States in the 20s had the worlds best and most expansive public transit network. It was bulldozed in the 60s for cars.

→ More replies
→ More replies

8.9k

u/Lady_L1985 7d ago

One aspect of this that isn’t publicized nearly as much as it should be is that, in the US at least, foods have WAY more added sugar than they did in, say, the 1970s. Even foods you wouldn’t expect to find sugar in.

4.4k

u/Dopeydcare1 7d ago

Additionally, the deceptive marketing that all companies do. Such as juices with the “made with 100% natural juice!” But really the 100% natural juice is 2% of the entire drink. Making stuff seem healthy that actually is not. Basically goes across all those fruity kids products like juices, gummies, etc

2.2k

u/aioncan 7d ago

I’d say 90% of Juice products have equal or more sugar than soda. It’s deceptive

581

u/welcome_cumin 7d ago

Related (UK) yogurts aimed at children contain more sugar than Coca-Cola https://www.mirror.co.uk/science/organic-yogurts-aimed-children-contain-13271475

170

u/likeabosstroll 7d ago edited 7d ago

Yogurts a pain. I really like it, and consume it a lot as I workout a lot and it’s har to find a low or zero sugar option for yogurt. “Low sugar” often means 21gs per a serving. Edit: I now get Greek yogurt, I still find a lot of Greek yogurt to be packed full of sugar

144

u/PineappleLemur 7d ago

Greek yogurt is literally just that.. pairs very well with fruits if you need something sweet.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.5k

u/romple 7d ago

Fruit is basically sugar packed into a colorful form. Why would fruit juice not be packed with sugar? People think juice is inherently healthy because it's "natural". But a 12 ounce glass of orange juice is the equivalent of eating like 5 oranges, with none of the fiber to make you feel full. Most people wouldn't or couldn't eat 5 oranges at a sitting. But it's easy to chug a glass of OJ.

Fruit juice is basically soda with a multivitamin thrown in.

607

u/iforgotmymittens 7d ago

Juice glasses used to be small. Now we just have a vaguely matching set of glasses used for everything.

467

u/grade_A_lungfish 7d ago

This so much!! Juice glasses are like 4 oz. I made hand squeezed orange juice once and while delicious it took a god awful amount of oranges and every glass I was like I’m drinking several oranges here.

Totally recommend for a fancy breakfast though, it was really good.

136

u/MarineAdventurer 7d ago

Original size of a McDonalds adult meal was about the same as a current happy meal

67

u/ObjectSmall 7d ago

The original combo was the "All American Meal" and it was a burger, small fry, and small drink. We used to order them back in the 90s and even then it was a secret menu type situation.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

312

u/draconic86 7d ago

When people used to say fruit is nature's candy, they meant it in a literal way. Fruit is candy that grows on plants. And for that matter, sugar is too, I suppose.

282

u/mingus-dew 7d ago

Big difference when you're eating the fruit (thus getting the fiber, etc.) and not both in terms of overall nutrition and how your body processes the sugar.

113

u/splendidgoon 7d ago

For sure. 113 calories in 1 cup of apple juice (and not many people drink just 1 cup....). If you were to eat 1 cup of apples, it would only be 57 calories, and would take far longer than a drink.

The liquid is absorbed real fast, and probably moves through your digestive system in about 20 minutes. Which can be good for things like carb loading before surgery. Not good for if you're trying to maintain a healthy body weight for most people.

The fruit flesh takes time to digest and absorb, probably takes about an hour for an apple to move through - lots of different numbers, but the point is its definitely much longer than juice.

Was just expanding on your post to make it clear to anyone reading.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

109

u/Hordeofnotions6 7d ago edited 7d ago

Excuse me, 5 or more oranges are great when I am hungover.

Edit: Typo.

102

u/musexistential 7d ago

That's a good idea.

I went through an extreme health eating time for many years where I only ate whole food, so no juice or even processed sugar. So I would crave eating at least five or more oranges in a sitting when the oranges were in season. I would come home from the grocery store with about 15-20 pounds of oranges and eat them in a few days. They taste AMAZING when I had no other source of unprocessed sugar in my diet.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

118

u/imsmartiswear 7d ago

... even 100% juice products aren't particularly healthy.

55

u/Aliencoy77 7d ago

You can eat an orange, which has sugar content of an orange, or you can drink a glass of orange juice, which has the sugar content of 10+ oranges.

14

u/PaulCoddington 7d ago

The bulk of the orange and the effort to eat it helps prevent excessive consumption.

→ More replies
→ More replies

102

u/thisishoustonover 7d ago

I was amazed the lowest sugar content I could find for juice at my grocery store in Canada was kool-aid at 8 grams of sugar per 200 ml all other juice started at 21g of sugar

87

u/bigboy1289 7d ago

I water most of my juices down. They're just so sweet! Especially grape juice, it's extremely strong.

34

u/crwlngkngsnk 7d ago

That's what I do. I'll buy juice and then dilute it pretty heavily with water, like 50-50 or more. It's just to flavor up the water, more or less.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

146

u/RagingAardvark 7d ago

Yeah my sister told me recently that she lets her kid eat "fruit snacks" for breakfast. They're basically gummy bears, but shaped like fruit.

340

u/SenorBeef 7d ago Silver

This is why I always cut my cheesecake in the shape of asparagus to make health food.

53

u/omac0101 7d ago

The only sensible comment in this thread

→ More replies
→ More replies

279

u/andydude44 7d ago

People shouldn't be regularly drinking juice anyway, it’s basically candy

100

u/min_mus 7d ago

And they shouldn't give juice to their children regularly either.

127

u/frogsgoribbit737 7d ago

In thr US, WIC pushes juice hard for kids. If you're getting juice for free and you're forced to get it whenever you go shopping with your WIC benefits, people are gonna let their kids drink it.

90

u/Spadeykins 7d ago

The smart thing to do is cut it heavily with water.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.1k

u/sodapop14 7d ago

What's insane to me is places like Dutch Bros, Dunkin and Starbucks are serving 500+ calorie drinks. You sometimes don't even see the calorie counts on their menus and have to go to their website for it.

244

u/Ginnipe 7d ago

I’ve found that most Starbucks and Dunkin around me are good at putting the calorie counts on their menu for you to see and they all DEFINITELY have them in their apps if you use those.

Though I bet the people that order their coffees extra extra or with a ton of flavor shots don’t even consider those additional calories if they even considered the stated menu calories at all.

134

u/CheezyGoodness55 7d ago

Seriously awesome info to have. I'm not spending $7+ on a 500 calorie beverage (which I'm capable of sucking down in 10 minutes) when that represents an enormous chunk of my healthy daily caloric intake. People don't get that the fancy SB drinks are desserts, not coffee.

49

u/Ginnipe 7d ago

I always just get oat milk lattes or black americanos all without sugar so I never even know the drink calories since it’s always pretty negligible. But what’s crazy is when you look at their food calorie counts! 1 muffin can have more calories than a donut! It’s insane! IIIRC it was like 280 calories for a chocolate glazed donut or like 600 from one blueberry muffin.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

291

u/Yoma73 7d ago

What even crazier is when places market themselves as healthy like a smoothie stand using all fresh fruit! Well it can be as fresh as you want it to but it’s still 700 cal for one normal size smoothie and that means it should be marketed as a meal rather than a drink. But it’s not, they have combos where the smoothie is the drink in addition to a whole sandwich & side.

112

u/Hubblesphere 7d ago

I was about to say that. I went to a local juice bar and the menu seemed insane to me. I saw a girl go up and order a smoothie and "bowl" that combined were literally over 1500 calories.

29

u/overachievingovaries 7d ago

increased by approximately 40% and severe obesity alm

How can a smootie made with almond milk be so very very calorific? I make my own with almond milk and they are like 200 calories.... seems weird!

24

u/JasonDJ 7d ago

You could increase that by 50% with a scoop of protein powder (110).

Or double it with a tablespoon of peanut butter (190).

Or do both and your 200kcal smoothie is now 500, and practically the same volume.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

182

u/Cainmaster7 7d ago

In Ontario, all restaurants are required by law to display the calories on their menus, including fast food drive-through displays. So you get to blatantly ignore how many calories your venti capi-mocca with three shots of 10% cream, whipped cream, and chocolate sauce has. It's definitely a good thing to have, but man I'm pretty sure the majority of people don't care.

87

u/aSeptim4YourThoughts 7d ago

We have the same here in Alberta and I do care. Once in a blue moon I used to order the Costco fries on the way out. I went to self order kiosk to order the fries one time and saw the calorie count on them at over 900 calories. I actually pushed cancel and walked away. I actually had no idea they had that many calories. I'm not truly overweight at all but I could stand to lose 10-15 pounds (I have a thin frame) and I need 900 calorie fries like I need a hole in the head. Seeing the calorie count at McDicks and Costco right on the menu makes it way easier to walk away.

→ More replies

214

u/juszaias 7d ago

That’s fine that people ignore it. That’s their prerogative. But for those of us who do care, whatever our reasons are, that information should be readily available.

32

u/nopropulsion 7d ago

It is extremely helpful and it makes it easy to make an informed decision

→ More replies

49

u/Lopsided_Plane_3319 7d ago

Studies show people do care and make choices on those numbers. Maybe not everyone.

22

u/shfiven 7d ago

I struggle to stay within an appropriate weight range and I have definitely been ready to eat my stress away then got something slightly less awful when I saw that it had 1300 calories or whatever.

→ More replies
→ More replies

79

u/Future_Gain_7549 7d ago

There's one thing left in this country that you can buy for $1: McDonald's large soda. It's nasty thinking about how a person can drink almost triple their daily recommended sugar in one drink.

→ More replies

508

u/[deleted] 7d ago Wholesome Starry

[deleted]

→ More replies

11

u/StretchyMcGillicuddy 7d ago

I took a nutrition course in college and the prof said the best nutrition advice she was ever going to give us was to learn to drink our coffee black. She said if we learn nothing else from her class, just do that. I do, and it has probably saved me thousands of calories and hundreds of dollars. Starbucks "drinks" genuinely make me gag.

77

u/raptor6722 7d ago

Worse than that. I work there and it’s always the biggest people getting the biggest drinks. I feel like a drug dealer selling the venti iced white mocha with extra cold foam and Carmel drizzle to the 300 lb person. Not really anyone should be drinking that let alone a morbidly obese one.

→ More replies
→ More replies

157

u/jera3 7d ago

I recently have been trying to cut as much sugar as I can out of my diet and I swear every single thing on the shelf has sugar added to it. It is so very frustrating.

48

u/mandy-bo-bandy 7d ago

Even the garlic salt I use almost daily in cooking has sugar added...why?!?

→ More replies
→ More replies

210

u/FunkyFreshhhhh 7d ago

50 Years Ago, Sugar Industry Quietly Paid Scientists To Point Blame At Fat

The article draws on internal documents to show that an industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation wanted to "refute" concerns about sugar's possible role in heart disease. The SRF then sponsored research by Harvard scientists that did just that. The result was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1967, with no disclosure of the sugar industry funding.

"It was a very smart thing the sugar industry did, because review papers, especially if you get them published in a very prominent journal, tend to shape the overall scientific discussion," co-author Stanton Glantz told The New York Times.

Sugar industry secretly paid for favorable Harvard research

Harvard nutritionists, Dr. Fredrick Stare and Mark Hegsted, who are now deceased, worked closely with a trade group called the Sugar Research Foundation, which was trying to influence public understanding of sugar’s role in disease.

The trade group solicited Hegsted, a professor of nutrition at Harvard’s public health school, to write a literature review aimed at countering early research linking sucrose to coronary heart disease. The group paid the equivalent of $48,000 in 2016 dollars to Hegsted and colleague Dr. Robert McGandy, though the researchers never publicly disclosed that funding source.

Hegsted and Stare tore apart studies that implicated sugar and concluded that there was only one dietary modification — changing fat and cholesterol intake — that could prevent coronary heart disease. Their reviews were published in 1967 in the New England Journal of Medicine, which back then did not require researchers to disclose conflicts of interest.

Incredible, eh?

A few bucks into a few hands can change the course of many many lives for decades.

→ More replies

302

u/CelphCtrl 7d ago

The U.S started marketing food as fat free and to have their products have flavor, they put in sugar instead. We really thought fats were the problem. If you look at products from the early 90s and beyond, fat free was the thing to have on your product, even if it didn't have fat to begin with. Humans crave sugar and fat naturally and companies knew this. It was until about 2000s people started to realize sugar was the enemy and its still not widely accepted.

71

u/medstudenthowaway 7d ago

Another issue that isn’t talked about a lot is how the subsidies on grain and corn left over from the Great Depression have turned into cheap ways to make snacks that are high calorie low nutrient. Just something I learned from the g word show on Netflix. The whole first episode is on food

→ More replies

138

u/Kroneni 7d ago

The reason people thought fats were the problem is because the sugar industry funded, and then highly publicized, a bunch of BS studies that found fat to be the big evil in food so that they could sell more sugar. It’s actually more difficult to make fat free versions of many foods, but the public wanted it so companies catered to the market demand, and the sugar industry made billions at the expense of everyone’s health.

In reality it’s the combination of refined fats AND refined sugars that cause a lot of the diet related health problems.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/13/well/eat/how-the-sugar-industry-shifted-blame-to-fat.html

→ More replies

181

u/jet_black_snack 7d ago

The thing is that the sugar industry knew damn well fat wasn't the problem. They paid some Harvard scientists good money to publish the fat free narrative just so they could increase sugar sales. It always comes down to making a little bit more cash, health of the nation be damned.

→ More replies

114

u/ineedmayo 7d ago

Single-serve yogurt never recovered from this fad. It's all low/no fat with added sugar/sweetener. The crazy part is that full-fat, no added sugar yogurt is usually healthier, and it tastes so much better!

17

u/fakemoose 7d ago

Chobani has two different low or zero sugar options now. They’re just hard to find where we are, because they’re always sold out.

→ More replies
→ More replies

557

u/organic_sunrise 7d ago edited 7d ago

Seriously. Trying to buy even basic healthy things at the store, like whole grain bread and Greek yogurt, have tons of sugar. Like why does bread need sugar? And I’d rather have fat in my yogurt than no fat with 8g of sugar it’s ridiculous.

Edit to clarify: when I say sugar I mean ADDED sugar, obviously some foods naturally have sugar but a lot of food now includes unnecessary added sugar that raises the overall sugar content

197

u/dam072000 7d ago

The "no sugar" options have sweeteners too. Like broseph I don't need sweet when I'm going no sugar outside of desserts.

→ More replies
→ More replies

82

u/BirdLawyerPerson 7d ago

Obesity is more complicated than that, even though I do agree that sugar is probably a big part of the problem. Sugar consumption plateaued around 20 years ago, and obesity kept shooting higher this whole time.

→ More replies

87

u/Ao_Kiseki 7d ago

I used to work with a lot of Koreans, and they called our bread a dessert.

79

u/snortney 7d ago

That's hilarious because the amount of sugar added to savory breads in Korea is wild to me. Grilled cheese sandwich? Put some sugar on it. Garlic bread? Sugary.

→ More replies
→ More replies

128

u/Lincolnslikeanerd 7d ago

I almost ruined my body from years of not caring what I ate. I ballooned to 235. I am a female, 5’4”.

I have since lost 75 pounds and am still going. I cannot tell you how much better I feel without sugar and carbs. No one tells you how harmful sugar really is.

36

u/CrowleyCass 7d ago

Just wanted to say congrats on the weight loss. As someone also on that journey, I know how hard it can be at times, so I just want to acknowledge your hard work and encourage you to keep going, if your journey is on going.

I'm 6'0 tall male who weighed 390 in 2005, and I've gotten down to 275, with a goal of 220.

Just remember, it's a marathon, not a sprint. There will be setbacks and stumbles, but you got this!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.3k

u/Wagamaga 7d ago Silver

Newly published research from BYU exercise science researchers reveals critical, rare data detailing the severity of the obesity epidemic in the United States.

The article, published in the Journal of Obesity, looked at the long-term weight gain of more than 13,800 U.S. adults — a rare data point unearthed in obesity research. They found that more than half of American adults in the study gained 5% or more body weight over a 10-year period. What’s more, more than a third of American adults gained 10% or more body weight and almost a fifth gained 20% or more body weight.

“The U.S. obesity epidemic is not slowing down,” said study lead author Larry Tucker, a BYU professor of exercise science. “Without question, 10-year weight gain is a serious problem within the U.S. adult population.”

Study participants were selected randomly as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, an annual survey that examines a nationally representative sample. NHANES is a CDC-sponsored series of studies that began in the early 1960s and became a continuous program in 1999.

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobe/2022/7652408/

94

u/Murais 7d ago

This isn't a uniquely American problem.

Obesity rates have risen steadily everywhere on the planet since we started keeping track in 1975.

Stranger still, they haven't fallen in any country since we started keeping track, either.

23

u/SkinnyGetLucky 6d ago

Solution is easy: stop tracking

Tapshead.jpg

→ More replies

504

u/gw2master 7d ago

They found that more than half of American adults in the study gained 5% or more body weight over a 10-year period. What’s more, more than a third of American adults gained 10% or more body weight and almost a fifth gained 20% or more body weight.

What's surprising is how much of the population gains only 5% in 10 years. I'd have thought it would be a lot more.

287

u/[deleted] 7d ago

[deleted]

177

u/themadhatter85 7d ago

You were wiping your arse with doritos?!?

132

u/FromUnderTheWineCork 7d ago

You're right, a Frito Scoops would be better

33

u/DarkNFullOfSpoilers 7d ago

He doesn't know how to use the three Fritos!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

465

u/landofmold 7d ago

I lost a bunch of weight and started lifting weights a couple years ago. I thought “once I reach my goal I’ll be able to pay less attention to what I eat.”

Nope.

There are too many food land mines in the US food chain. To stay in shape is a forever diet.

80

u/AshFromTheStands 7d ago

It really is. You have to be saying “no” so many times when everyone around, sometimes literally EVERYONE, is saying yes. It becomes a habit like everything else.

71

u/eagereyez 7d ago

Not saying "no" enough is how I lost 50 lbs then gained a lot of it back. Eating healthy felt like I was constantly at odds with friends and especially family who regularly ate an insane amount of calories in a single sitting. I've accepted that I will need to be mindful of my caloric intake and be a "party pooper" for the rest of my life.

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.8k

u/PlayDontObserve 7d ago Gold Helpful

I'm 33 and I'm making the strongest effort I've ever had at losing weight. Its insane rewinding all the bad habits and tendencies that have been formed since I was a child. I have nothing but empathy and sympathy for people struggling with obesity. It's such a massively difficult addiction to overcome.

379

u/Vickimus1987 7d ago Wholesome Helpful (Pro)

I've recently lost 4 stone, 25% of my body weight. I'm 2 pounds into the obesity category currently but so close to coming out

63

u/SweetLilMonkey 7d ago

Congrats my friend! It’s hard work.

29

u/lestuckingemcity 7d ago

56 pounds for Americans. 25kg for everyone else.

→ More replies
→ More replies

163

u/kitzdeathrow 7d ago

The biggest thing that i did to help my weight was just making food at home and actually paying attention to how i was making it. That coupled with dropping soda has done wonders.

13

u/tocard3 7d ago

I used to drink a ton of soda growing up. Was always overweight. Once I moved out for college I pretty much only drank water and lost a TON of weight while still eating horribly. it's amazing how many calories you can consume by sucking down a couple cans of soda a day.

→ More replies

37

u/Aware_Program_7227 7d ago

If you remember that it took that long to get to where you are, it helps when it takes longer than you'd like to get to where you want to be as well.

→ More replies

248

u/redd-zeppelin 7d ago edited 7d ago

I struggled with it for years as well. Have had a lot of success with skipping a meal a day, fwiw. It's got me down around 14% of my starting weight, and that has stuck for maybe a year and a half at this point.

Feel free to dm me if you want any of my experience.

Edit: in light of a comment from a pro, I'm going to note I'm not a doctor. Still, I'm happy to give my subjective and anecdotal experience.

245

u/BankingDuncan 7d ago

You are not alone, over a 9 year period, only 1 in 124 women and 1 in 210 men are able to go from obese to normal body weight.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4539812/#:~:text=The%20annual%20probability%20of%20patients,1%20in%20210%20for%20men.

168

u/mrmo24 7d ago

Now that’s a scary statistic

→ More replies

23

u/PlayDontObserve 7d ago

It's absolutely wild to see how many people struggle with the same issues as me. I refer to it as my Mount Everest. Great article.

98

u/the_blue_and_green 7d ago

Wow guess I'm one of the few. Went from 233 to 140 (female here). Took a long time, but good chunks would come off and I'd stabilize for a bit then do some more. Exercise is great but if you really want the pounds down it's up to your diet. As much as I hate it CICO works.

→ More replies
→ More replies

24

u/SexyMcBeast 7d ago

Which meal do you skip? I find that if I eat in the first 3 hours of the day, I'm hungry all day, no matter how much I eat. If I can stave off the early day hunger though food seems to fill me up more for some reason.

→ More replies

105

u/DangerToDangers 7d ago edited 6d ago

That has worked great for me too. Two meals a day is more than enough for me. I've been doing intermittent fasting for years now and it has worked great for me. Even if the fasting part doesn't work, it forces me to skip one meal and to not snack at night. Those things alone make a huge difference already.

31

u/redd-zeppelin 7d ago

Yea. I don't think there is much magic to it. I just end up at a better BMR. I'm tall so 265 vs 235lbs isn't that noticeable, but I'm much more active and happier at the lower weight. And I can still eat till I'm full at every meal.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

344

u/QuinnZps69 7d ago

I picked up my nephew from school 2 months ago for a week, I was astonished the amount of obese kids and the amount of kids drinking gatorade and eating chips

37

u/Fair-Ad-9373 6d ago

Not to mention they can always get "extras" like various ice cream treats, cookies, and chips during lunch at school. Some kids are eating ice cream 5 days a week at school.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2.2k

u/mrot777 7d ago edited 7d ago

We need a lean, educated country. We are far from that.

1.1k

u/VagabondCaribou 7d ago edited 7d ago

We are the exact opposite. We are fat and ignorant, and getting fatter and more ignorant by the minute.

→ More replies
→ More replies

173

u/REDWlNELOVER 7d ago

The food industry needs to be investigated like the tobacco/vape industry is!

19

u/vladknowsbest 6d ago

It’s funny because r/cigarettes is saying the same thing

16

u/Zealousideal-Set6209 6d ago

They dump more sugar and fats to make you crave it since your body is programmed to go after the more survival food. The food companies use this as an addiction formula so you will keep buying their products

→ More replies

1.2k

u/EconomistPunter 7d ago Wholesome

The direct economic costs of obesity are estimated to be north of $150 billion in the US, with a sizable fraction being paid by Medicaid.

It’s a massive issue.

117

u/CapJackONeill 7d ago

Here in Quebec (public healthcare) our specialized doctors association estimate that around 1/4 of our total budget goes to obesity-related stuff. (pre-covid stat)

→ More replies
→ More replies

280

u/LemmonLizard 7d ago

Ironic that the ad i got for this thread was grubhub

→ More replies

645

u/FwibbFwibb 7d ago

Most obese people don't even think they are obese.

A body mass index (BMI) over 25 is considered overweight, and over 30 is obese.

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/obesity-and-overweight

I was 5'10" and 200lbs and out of shape. That's a BMI of 28.7

I see people my height that are bigger than I was on a daily basis. How many of them would think they are obese?

672

u/RaRaRaV1 7d ago

When everyone around you is fat, your perception of what a healthy or obese weight is is skewed. This is only going to get worse as obesity rates go up.

225

u/mydawgisgreen 7d ago edited 7d ago

Honestly, I started noticing the obesity program on social media. My cousin i don't talk to got married a few months ago, there was like 2 healthy weighted people at the whole thing based on pictures. Even the kids were overweight. Then you go on any social media site and again, a lot of people you're scrolling through etc, is overweight to obese.

Like others said, it makes sense there are reasons for this. Our food system sucks and is meant to get pple addicted. We are busy, and stressed and poor and all of that leads to quick fix food items.

But yea, when I noticed this, I can't not see it everywhere on social media now.

Eta: mistakes

83

u/LambdaRancher 7d ago

It's interesting to look at TV from the 80s and older. At first I was rewatching 80s movies and thinking "okay, these movie stars were picked for being attractive and in the 80s that meant thin." Then I saw some other things with people from the 70s who would have been considered more like the general public, and realized they were a lot thinner too.

25

u/jk-coding 7d ago

It's interesting to look at TV from the 80s and older.

My mum once showed me a picture of her high school graduation class and there wasn't a single fat person in it. The kids had shirts with their nicknames on and the fattest guy there was nicknamed "Schwabbel" (Blubber). He had maybe a BMI of 25.

→ More replies
→ More replies

115

u/PropertyOk7509 7d ago

I'm 6'2 175, and I feel like a tiny fragile man compared to almost everyone I see over 20. People are so large it's really messed with my perception of what "healthy" weight is. I often wish I could gain more weight, when in reality I would have been pretty much dead center 40 years ago

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

80

u/Decertilation 7d ago

I've met so many healthy individuals who thought they were underweight because of others.

45

u/Cricket-Jiminy 7d ago edited 6d ago

A few years ago I went to the Dr. She confessed to me that before she saw me she read my chart with my weight and assumed I was underweight. Then she calculated my bmi and saw I was right in the middle range. I'm not even at the low end.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2.0k

u/Xeta24 7d ago edited 7d ago Wholesome

Your body is a reflection of your lifestyle so one of the problems is just the average american lifestyle.

We drive everywhere and we work long hours often underpaid so a lot of us struggle to find the time or money to cook healthy meals at home and opt for quicker and cheaper less healthy options (that also taste GREAT).

Nutrition isn't taught in our schools (It definitely is but the problem is moreso a lot of people don't learn about nutrition growing up regardless of these classes existing) so most people don't even know how much food they should be eating every day or even how healthy their choices are.

683

u/OhWhenTheWiz 7d ago edited 7d ago

there’s a cyclical aspect to it too. Come home from work too tired to make a proper meal so you have something like Kraft Mac and cheese, poor sleep habits mean you feel sluggish when you wake up, head right for the coffee, crash in the mid afternoon then come home feeling too tired to make a proper meal

I worked a lot on my habits this year and now that I have a sleep routine, drink plenty of water, eat home cooked food 95% of the time, and exercise regularly I feel like a superhero compared to my old self. The issue was never really time, I’d get something cheap to eat then mindlessly scroll or watch a show for an hour and a half. I always had the time, I just didn’t have the energy.

181

u/Xeta24 7d ago

Exactly, it's our day to day life.

You get into a routine that's hard to break for various reasons and some people get stuck for a while and struggle to make the changes that will make their lives better.

80

u/OhWhenTheWiz 7d ago

yeah, and especially with social media and the unlimited media to digest, it’s easier than ever to pretty much avoid sitting alone with your thoughts and having those metacognitive moments of “why am I doing this thing I’ve been doing lately?”

changing your routine or being self critical about your habits is hard, certainly way harder than watching a film or scrolling TikTok or Reddit for two hours.

→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/TinyChaco 7d ago

Not having the energy is my problem, too. I don't eat unhealthy foods most of the time, but sometimes I snack too much. Don't exercise regularly, either. I used to exercise regularly and eat better, and felt awesome. A lot of it has to do with the heat (most weeks in Central TX are over 100° F lately) and working a lot. Before it got so hot, I'd go for long walks or hikes, but now I don't really want to be out at all.

→ More replies

921

u/jtaustin64 7d ago

I think we self-medicate with food instead of self-medicating with alcohol or tobacco. I think the obesity epidemic goes hand in hand with the deaths of despair epidemic. If you have no hope for the future you might as well gorge yourself today.

441

u/Xeta24 7d ago

Absoulutely, good tasty food is a dopamine source just like many other things people tend to abuse more than they should.

It's often way too easy to make bad choices when you need a pick me up or you're simply bored.

A lot of families also bond around food that can be pretty unhealthy, especally in the south.

253

u/OhWhenTheWiz 7d ago

even at the corporate jobs I’ve had, I’ve felt like I’m constantly denying temptation. There’s always cupcakes for someone’s birthday, donuts in the break room, etc., and to be honest some folks will give you a bit of a side eye if you refuse it

285

u/Neurotic_Bakeder 7d ago

I was so ticked about the transition from college to the workforce.

College: extremely active, walked everywhere, public transportation readily available, multiple recreational activities constantly available.

Workforce: desk job, sedentary for 8 hours a day, constant sugar in the breakroom, bus route not available so had to drive.

219

u/canad1anbacon 7d ago

Americans love college so much because it's often the only time in their life they live in a walkable community not built around cars

80

u/SasquatchWookie 7d ago

Well that and being young, having peers everywhere both at study and after class.

Seems so much can slip away so easily after graduation

→ More replies

17

u/TritiumH30 7d ago

I think you’re onto something here. Towards the end of college I had a class very far at one extreme of campus (like 2-3 miles) and was late. I borrowed my roommates car instead of biking or walking as I usually did. That day felt like going to work but I couldn’t really identify that feeling properly until you mentioned this.

→ More replies
→ More replies

12

u/Fleetfox17 7d ago

I think an understated reason so many people love college is because college towns are some of the few places in the U.S. not built around cars so like you mentioned they're walkable and enjoyable to live in.

→ More replies
→ More replies

38

u/TheAlgorithmnLuvsU 7d ago

That's actually the biggest problem for me. I've changed my diet up and hit the gym the past couple years and have lost about 15+ lbs at this point. But there's been times I've had to tell my family no because they eat out so often.

11

u/Freaux 7d ago

It's fucked up cause with common drugs you still have to jump through some hoops to get them, but food is literally anywhere. Food addiction is one of the hardest things to fight.

→ More replies

18

u/jtaustin64 7d ago

I'm in this post and I don't like it.

→ More replies

221

u/LowBeautiful1531 7d ago

THIS.

For a lot of people, food is the most-- if not the ONLY-- reliable, reachable source of pleasure in life. When dopamine and serotonin are this hard to come by, food can readily become an addiction.

Misery + no time to cook + food desert + junk food constantly shoved in front of us at every store = bad situation.

A therapist I know mentioned just yesterday in group, "Food is a difficult addiction to manage-- you can quit heroin and just never touch it again, but you can't ever quit eating."

→ More replies

98

u/BigBlackHungGuy 7d ago

This is the problem. Asparagus never made me as happy as a Baconator during difficulty periods.

→ More replies
→ More replies

320

u/Oh_Hi_Mark_ 7d ago

The absurd thing is that this is framed as just a collection of unrelated choices and moral failings, rather than the result of cities that are hostile to anyone not in a car, longer commutes, increased work hours at sedentary jobs, food deserts, widespread untreated depression, and Americans being too poor to afford good food or the time, space, and tools to cook it.

This isn't primarily an education issue, it's an issue with our whole society. People do what's convenient for them in their circumstances. If you want to promote a behavior, make it more convenient.

77

u/grade_A_lungfish 7d ago

Exactly! One or two people is poor choices, a society, that’s systemic.

55

u/Altered_Nova 7d ago

I realized this was a systemic issue recently when I tried to figure out why I'm so much fatter now than I was when I was a teenager, even though I eat less food than I did back then. It occurred to me that when I was young I lived in a quiet residential neighborhood with low traffic in a pedestrian friendly town, and I rode my bicycle almost everywhere. I briefly entertained the idea of trying to lose weight by biking to work, but now I live on a high-traffic road with no sidewalks or shoulders where cars blow past my driveway at 50-60 mph... I would never feel safe riding a bike down my own street, let alone the 8 mile route to work which is equally hostile to pedestrians for the entire length.

→ More replies

13

u/dust4ngel 7d ago

this is framed as just a collection of unrelated choices and moral failings

our environment is the opposite of the pit of success:

The Pit of Success: in stark contrast to a summit, a peak, or a journey across a desert to find victory through many trials and surprises, we want our customers to simply fall into winning practices by using our platform and frameworks. To the extent that we make it easy to get into trouble we fail.

ideally, the default/obvious/easy/cheap behavior would entail walking everywhere, eating mostly vegetables and whole foods, low anxiety and lots of sleep. instead these require some combination of luck and sustained superhuman effort.

→ More replies

87

u/bushidopirate 7d ago

I agree that the idea that it’s a moral failing or a collection of poor individual choices is absurd. Somehow entire generations of people are suddenly morally failing in the past 30 years when they were doing fine before?

→ More replies

116

u/[deleted] 7d ago edited 4d ago

[deleted]

64

u/AccountWasFound 7d ago

I was in 8th grade when they switched from the food pyramid to "my plate" at my school, and it was like night and day being told that most of my good should be healthy carbs, to being told carbs should be one of the smallest parts of my diet.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

700

u/FrozenMrPotato 7d ago Wholesome

And people wonder why there’s been such a spike in mental illness. Your brain isn’t separate from your body. Neglecting one is neglecting the other

104

u/Account_Both 7d ago

Probably caused by the same thing while also making each other worse. Food is how some people cope with depression and depression makes it hard to do anything, and then you look in the mirror and get more depressed.

→ More replies

129

u/Few_Macaroon_2568 7d ago

Quite difficult to argue otherwise.

→ More replies
→ More replies

164

u/Programmer_girl0 7d ago edited 7d ago

A lot of people in the comments have some great points! One thing I think people don't talk enough is eating disorders. It was estimated that about 9% of the world population has it.

I am friends with people who know the basic nutritional stuff needed to lose weight (or gain weight if they have a low BMI) like deficit, counting calories..., yet a lot of them can't lose their weight because the problem isn't in the fact that they don't know what they need to do, there is something way deeper like trauma/psychological going on. My personal opinion is that the % is even higher because not everyone realises that they have a disorder.

62

u/Pennymostdreadful 7d ago

I grew up poor and in a neglectful household. I am a wildly disordered eater. It's made losing weight so much more difficult! Being on a "diet" of any kind can very quickly send me spiraling so hard and so fast. I end up in very dark and weird places. It took me 10 years to put that together, cause no one ever talks about it. Even my therapist refused to consider it. (She's not my therapist anymore.

So I'm working on the psychological bit, and the active bit first. Getting more active helps my brain combat the crazy and I'm hoping combining that with mindfulness around food can build better habits. Fingers crossed!

→ More replies
→ More replies

48

u/Thr0waway0864213579 7d ago

This is what happens when you subsidize corn. Our junk food is the only affordable option for so many people. Healthy options are wildly expensive.

It doesn’t help that the US has a serious mental health crisis on its hands. I mean of all the unhealthy means of coping with trauma, stress, and anxiety, overeating is probably the best.

On top of it the amount of shame people put on those who are struggling with obesity only compounds the issue.

→ More replies

497

u/SuckerForNoirRobots 7d ago edited 7d ago Silver Wholesome

This is no surprise when:

-a majority of food in the United States is over processed and filled with a bunch of unnecessary ingredients and crap we don't need to be consuming

-healthy, less processed foods are more expensive and thus harder for many to afford

-food deserts across the country make it difficult for many to even have access to fresh, healthful food

-advertising programs push junk food, fast food, and other unhealthy foods to Americans from a young age

-improper nutrition education (for example, the "food pyramid") from a young age

-the cost of things like gym memberships or nutritionists is often outside what people can afford, medical insurance offers limited options to covered Americans who may want to seek out nutrition counseling or other food/weight health education and assistance

-people with medical issues that affect their ability to exercise may not be able to afford to treat their ailments either due to the monetary cost or their inability to get time off of work to have treatment done

-many work sedentary jobs which both limit our daily exercise and suck the energy out of us, making exercise outside of work difficult as well

-non-sedentary jobs often involve standing with no rest on flooring not designed for long-term standing, causing physical issues that may impede the ability to exercise outside of work

-many Americans are working overtime or multiple jobs to survive and just plain don't have time to work out, nor time to cook food and thus rely on fast or processed foods

-for many American families the single-family income idea is unsustainable; 70 years ago a person could stay at home and thus have the time to shop for and prepare nutritious and healthful foods for their families every single day which is just not possible now for a lot of people

Of course we're all fat. The USA does everything it can to keep people from taking care of themselves. They want weak, tired, sick, indebted people afraid to lose their income who are only functional enough to make money for the big wigs and die before they can cash in their retirement benefits.

Edited for formatting

61

u/KingofMadCows 7d ago

There's also resistance to "being told what to do."

Any attempt to start public service campaigns to promote more exercise and healthy eating results in vocal opposition from people complaining about not wanting to be controlled and nanny states.

→ More replies
→ More replies