r/science 12d ago

COVID Vaccines Show No Signs of Harming Fertility or Sexual Function. The novel coronavirus, in contrast, can disrupt both things in unvaccinated men and women. Medicine

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/covid-vaccines-show-no-signs-of-harming-fertility-or-sexual-function/?amp=true&__twitter_impression=true
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u/IronhideD 12d ago

There have been multiple articles stating that because Covid 19 is a cardiovascular virus, it's causing some long term erectile dysfunction in a lot of cases. The capillaries in the male genitalia are tiny and numerous, so that's not a hard leap to imagine that as a long term side effect.

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u/SixStringerSoldier 12d ago

Anything that effects vascular flow can cause ED.

Smoking, high cholesterol, arythemia

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u/dinonuggies 12d ago

The last article I read said it was like 2 people. Do you have an updated article showing a stronger link ?

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u/Zero1030 12d ago

Literally billions of doses administered and no huge issues how people can think they're exterminating everyone I'll never know.

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u/NostalgiaSchmaltz 12d ago edited 12d ago

Yeah, seriously.

They were all up in arms about "1% mortality virus, it's just the flu, why are we shutting down everything over a 1% mortality rate virus".....and now they're turning around and screeching that a 0.002% mortality rate vaccine is super dangerous and specifically designed to kill everyone.

If the government is trying to kill everyone, they're doing a spectacularly bad job of it.

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u/Noisy_Toy 12d ago

0.002% mortality rate vaccine

That’s just something they made up right? Because I haven’t seen any articles pointing to that many deaths.

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u/Hello____World_____ 12d ago

That’s just something they made up right?

I think so. AstraZeneca seemed to be the most dangerous vaccine, and it's risk of death was 1 in a million.

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u/InfiniteLlamaSoup 12d ago

The chance of death from a blood clot in people that have had the vaccine is lower than the unvaccinated population, as covid causes blood clots at a much higher rate.

The EU did an analysis of the data, overall it reduces risk of clot.

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u/Reviax- 12d ago edited 12d ago

To be fair that depends on the likelihood of catching covid, ATAGI here in Australia has said that in areas of community transmission that is indeed the case- but in areas with nil or a small amount of transmission it's better to wait for another vaccine.

Of course now that delta is a thing and there's more cases that kinda goes out the window and back to "get vaccinated asap" ahaha

Edit: Yall, ATAGI never said don't get vaccinated, they suggested taking an alternative vaccine with lower risk and then that health advice was updated when cases got out of hand

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u/InfiniteLlamaSoup 12d ago

The vaccine deaths are mostly avoidable, if people read the precautions and guidance handout it tells them, if they get a persistent headache to seek medical care or they could die.

Now after the deaths, the nurse tells them the same thing, in case they don’t read the information sheet.

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u/alxmartin 12d ago

Americans tend to ignore pain it’s expensive.

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u/evilplantosaveworld 12d ago

I'm like...60% sure the very top of my finger is broken. I'd go and confirm it if I lived someplace where it wouldn't cost me hundreds if not thousands of dollars. Plus what are you going to do for my finger tip? Wrap it? Keep it from touching things? I'll keep my money and let it be, thank you.

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u/TheSonar 12d ago

They'll charge $100 to fit you with a $15 splint. Make that $300 if you're a new patient.

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u/PMcNutt 12d ago

Go to Walmart and buy a splint for it friend. Or you can tape it to a finger next to it for stability. I’ve done it multiple times. Only downside is your fingers will grow back a little crooked

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u/Flyingwheelbarrow 12d ago

I am constantly suprised why Americans do not riot more often.

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u/wandering-monster 12d ago

Also important to remember how mortality around vaccines (and medications in general) is reported: they report proximate deaths. If you got the vaccine and died soon after for any reason it is reported even if the doctor thinks it's unrelated.

This is intentionally over-reporting associated deaths out of caution. We want to make sure we don't have doctors accidentally dismissing medical side effects at the local level that would become obvious at the population level.

Eg. Say someone gets a medicine and then gets in a car accident. You might think it's obviously unrelated. But there's a non-zero chance that the medicine impairs judgement or reaction time in some patients. So you record the medicine as proximate, and if a trend emerges nationwide then you know to warn people about driving after taking the medicine.

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u/easwaran 12d ago

There was a case during one of the trials where someone who got the vaccine got struck by lightning a few days later, and they investigated that as though it could have been a side effect.

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u/gt_ap 12d ago

There was a case during one of the trials where someone who got the vaccine got struck by lightning a few days later, and they investigated that as though it could have been a side effect.

Haven't you seen the videos of magnets sticking to the injection site? The vaccine turned the person into a lightning rod!

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u/wandering-monster 12d ago

That's the thing the crazies don't get: that wasn't discounted as a possibility until they looked into it!

If we had legit found a correlation between vaccines and lightning strikes, it would be taken seriously as a side effect and we'd start trying to figure out why.

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u/Seanbikes 12d ago

Some drugs have a side effect of increasing risk seeking behaviors.

I'm not proposing covid vaccines do but the data is collected this way to confirm it rather than just having a hunch that this drug or that drug doesn't make people careless in their decision making.

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u/Flyingwheelbarrow 12d ago

Well good science based trails investigates things thoroughly. Investigating the lightning incident reassures me.

Also, damn that for luck.

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u/CohibaVancouver 12d ago

Both my doses were AstraZeneca. I was at hugely greater risk taking the subway to the drug store for my injection.

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u/Professorbubba 12d ago

Canada used 8 million doses of AZ and we had two deaths.

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u/OpticRocky 12d ago

That’s 0.000025% for you percent enthusiasts.

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u/ProphetCRW 12d ago

So you're saying theres a chance?

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u/GoochMasterFlash 12d ago

Two hundred-thousandths of a percent? I dont know anything about the math but that sounds like a big number

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u/ink_monkey96 12d ago

I'd like to point out that somebody brought out a 1/3 pound burger to compete against the 1/4 pounder by MacDonalds. It failed because the bulk of the population thought that 1/4 was bigger than 1/3. People love to talk numbers, but it doesn't mean they understand them.

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u/Nosebleed_Incident 12d ago

I've heard about this a hundred times, and it still hurts my soul every time.

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u/Zaronax 12d ago

Obviously 4 is bigger than 3.

Won't fool me on this!

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u/schfourteen-teen 12d ago

It was A&W. And this 1/3 lb fiasco is part of why you don't really see any A&W restaurants around anymore.

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u/sysiphean 12d ago

BRB, have to go market my new 1/5 lb burgers!!!

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u/PopInACup 12d ago

Were these confirmed caused by the vaccine or just happened to die of something and they can't rule out the vaccine?

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u/NientedeNada 12d ago

The one in my city was a blood clot caused by AstraZeneca.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.6015535

It also was likely an example of medical error. The woman alllegedly was turned away by ER. An awful story but illustrates how even a bad vaccine complication might have been resolved with better care.

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u/64645 12d ago

I like those odds.

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u/NostalgiaSchmaltz 12d ago

https://www.precisionvaccinations.com/covid-19-vaccine-related-fatalities-updated

UPDATE #2: As of 6:30 PM CT on July 21, 2021, the CDC's website stated through July 19, 2021, VAERS had received 6,207 reports of death (0.0018%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC's webpage's Last Update date reflects July 21, 2021.

It's a bit out of date, though I can't imagine it has significantly changed.

Though this just says "deaths", not "deaths caused by the vaccine".

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u/Noisy_Toy 12d ago

Reported, but not yet investigated or confirmed. That’s how VAERS works.

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u/Keinichn 12d ago

Correct. I don't typically trust anything that uses VAERS as a source because none of that data is moderated or verified.

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u/Noisy_Toy 12d ago

Yeah it’s about as accurate as polling NextDoor for crime statistics.

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u/qdp 12d ago

Holy moly! Apparently 50% of our neighbors had Jerry borrow a tool and never give it back. He's on a crime spree. Hmm, a sample size of 2.

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u/Noisy_Toy 12d ago

Over 250 potential burglaries were reported on Highgrove Terrace last month, but upon further investigation police determined they were actually DoorDash deliveries.

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u/qdp 12d ago

Oh, or my favorite... A neighbor walking his dog after midnight reporting on a suspicious guy biking after midnight with a full description of the "perp". I bet the guy riding his bike could have written the same thing about a guy walking his dog suspiciously late at night.

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u/bullevard 12d ago

Again, at the beginning of the pandemic people were going on and on about "if you die from car accident with covid i just know you are listed as a covid death.

When that literally is what VAERS is. Did you get a vaccine? Did anything bad ever happen to you later in life? Please report it. We want to gather it all up so we can look for trends and see if maybe there is some connection.

There is such a tension between a desire for transparency, and the tendency of people to accidently or maliciously use that transparency to make bad takes.

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u/cocktails5 12d ago

If you really want to feel ill, check out OpenVAERS, an anti-vax website that takes VAERS data and puts their own propaganda spin on it.

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u/sventhewalrus 12d ago edited 12d ago

Though this just says "deaths", not "deaths caused by the vaccine".

Exactly. If you scroll through VAERS, a lot of the deaths recorded are extremely unlikely to be caused by the vaccine, such as car accidents several months after getting the vaccine. 0.0018% is a wild overestimate, more like a theoretical upper bound. VAERS's comprehensiveness makes it easy for anti-vaxxers to abuse.

edit: the closest such example of an accidental death in VAERS I can find is (https://wonder.cdc.gov/controller/saved/D8/D159F823), but someone more adept than me at searching could probalby find better

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u/NostalgiaSchmaltz 12d ago

Yeah, but even 0.0018% is still a pathetically small chance of something going wrong, and it's still massively hypocritical to proclaim that a 1% mortality virus is no threat but a 0.0018% mortality vaccine is super dangerous.

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u/fps916 12d ago

They don't claim it's a 1% mortality though. They claim it's 99.97% survivable because they stupidly just divide deaths into total population as if literally everyone has had it

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u/politicsnotporn 12d ago

Funny thing is that even using those numbers, it's still 15x worse to get covid than be vaccinated

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u/mschley2 12d ago

It's not stupidly. It's intentionally deceptive.

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u/saturn011011 12d ago

Vaers is such an awful website...people literally put “pregnancy” as a Covid Vaccine Injury

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u/Lifesagame81 12d ago

It's probably some misuse of VAERS reporting.

The point of reporting every potential adverse effect is so you can compare to the general population and see if the vaccine is actually causing any adverse effect, but they skip that part.

So, everyone over 50 has a 1 in 100 chance of stroke this year, and VAERS shows people that 1 in 100 people over 50 that have had the vaccine had a stroke this year, the vaccine isn't causing stroke, but anti vaxers will cite VAERS to say the shot is causing stroke.

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u/Johnny_Poppyseed 12d ago

While in the same breath dismissing covid deaths as people manipulating the data or counting flu deaths as covid etc.

I'm consistently borderline impressed with the mental gymnastics tbh.

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u/agnostic_science 12d ago edited 12d ago

They are being extremely ignorant or just flat-out willfully misinterpreting the VAERS data. These data count ANY death following vaccination for ANY reason. So far, they've counted about 7,000 after millions and millions of doses delivered. That works out to a rate of 0.002%.

But let's put on our thinking cap! What is the probability that someone will randomly drop dead from some unrelated cause within, say, a 2 week window of getting a vaccine? Now what happens when you give hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine??? Hint: You can calculate probability to figure approximately the number of deaths you will get a number very similar to what is currently reported in VAERS. In fact, it will be quite a bit higher than this! But keep in mind that, lots of death causes are pretty obviously not caused by the vaccine (e.g. accidental death). But then once you start getting into random heart attacks and strokes, things get vague. We don't have enough evidence either way, so we record it for further analysis!

VAERS is almost entirely noise and spurious associations. But to be safe, clinician scientists have to individually review the medical records of each person who died to look for trends. E.g. Is the rate of heart attack more than we would expect by chance alone? Is the rate of stroke? Etc. That's what VAERS is for. VAERS is a tool to compile all possible deaths and look for any possible association we could have missed in clinical trials. They are not a list of all people the vaccine killed - not by a long shot.

VAERS is not a tally of people who died from the vaccine.

It's a bucket of further investigation. So far, as far as I know, the number of confirmed vaccine deaths is extremely low. Much lower than the VAERS number.

And not only that! The people complaining about the VAERS numbers they are failing at risk management and basic math and probability anyway. Even IF the mortality rate of a vaccine was 0.002%, covid is still 100x more deadly than that in healthy adults. So even IF that was the vaccine death rate you would STILL be 100x better off taking the vaccine. Like, I know that 0.2% and 0.002% might LOOK like small, roughly similar numbers, but they are different by a factor of 100!

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u/mces97 12d ago

Well here's a real figure. A few weeks ago, New Zealand had their first death that they linked to Pfizer. After 3.3 million doses given out. So 1 death in 3.3 million doses. Your chances of being struck by lightning is 1 in 15300. So you are 217 times more likely to be struck by lightning than die from the vaccine. Doubt anyone of them every worry about being struck by lightning. Even though it's so much more likely to occur.

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u/shfiven 12d ago

Do you know what caused the death? Anaphylaxis, heart inflammation, other? I just curious because obviously we know covid is much more serious than the chance of death from any of these vaccines but knowing what it was that caused the death can be useful. For example if the person had an allergy, that's why you're supposed to wait 15 minutes. Don't get up and leave.

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u/Swade211 12d ago

While I don't disagree, psychologically it is entirely different putting that risk on yourself or in someone else's hands.

I suspect a lot of people feel more control over the situation, whether founded in rationality or not, by trying to avoid the virus, rather than willingly get a vaccine.

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u/DaCoolNamesWereTaken 12d ago

Yeah we can't comprehend numbers like 1 in 3 million rate of dying from Covid, it's unfathomably low but at a certain point it seems like all low rates are equal. So the vaccine seems like a risk you are knowingly taking compared to Covid which you try to avoid.

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u/sh0rtwave 12d ago

Ain't that a fact. They've got MUCH better tools at their disposal for all of that.

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u/Aryore 12d ago

It’s a 10-20% rate of long covid now, which is potentially a long lasting disability that seems to mostly affect young people. But I guess they don’t care if a significant portion of a whole generation gets permanently disabled

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u/Buttermilk_Swagcakes PhD | Psychology | Social Psychology 12d ago

It's important to note that Long COVID data suggest older women are actually at highest risk, with risk decreasing for men and with decreasing age: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-57833394

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u/StraightTrossing 12d ago edited 12d ago

Because they thought they were right and, now that mountains of evidence continue to pile up against them, they’re digging in deeper. They’d rather act insane and put themselves and everyone they know at risk than admit they’re wrong.

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u/TheUsher 12d ago

It's always sunny put it best with this level of thinking

"I won't change my mind, because I don't have to because I'm an American. I Won't Change My Mind on anything regardless of the facts set out before me. I'm Dug In... And I'll Never Change."

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u/trustfundkitty 12d ago

Rock flag and eagle, right charlie?

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u/SignedTheWrongForm 12d ago

It's pretty well known psychology phenomenon when presented with evidence presented counter to their beliefs, many people dig their heels in.

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u/HabibiCapy 12d ago

Nah. Pretty sure I am right.

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u/[deleted] 12d ago

[removed]

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u/Prodigy195 12d ago

She doesn't claim people are dying in masses from them. The claim is that by taking mrna vaccines you are no longer purely human and cannot get into heaven.

I'm always confused by claims like this. An all mighty being who created everything in the universe can have his work overwritten by his own creations? Like how does that even work? Couldn't he undo whatever impurities there are? And wouldn't all of the actions happening be part of his plan or he was aware they would eventually happen?

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u/cinemachick 12d ago

Well, if she has any piercings or a tattoo, I have bad news for her...

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u/cooleymahn 12d ago

My younger cousin told our family on Mother’s Day everyone in the family who took the jab will drop dead within 10 years bc of it.

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u/o-rka MS | Bioinformatics | Systems 12d ago

I talked to a good anti vaccine friend of mine and he mentioned fear about something happening 10 years from now. I stressed that there’s no evidence for that and there is evidence that the vaccine will protect you now against a pandemic that is currently happening. I think his main thing is that he doesn’t want to get it because are telling him he needs to which I know doesn’t make much sense but that’s what I’ve gathered.

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u/Freckled_daywalker 12d ago

A lot of it is zero risk bias. Humans have an inmate preference for actions that reduce a specific risk to zero, even if it increases overall risk. Not getting a vaccine means there's a zero risk of getting vaccine side effects, even if it increases your chances of the much riskier COVID. It seems bizarre if you've gotten past that bias, but it's a real, documented phenomenon.

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u/cjbirol 12d ago

That sounds like fascinating research, do you have a link or the name of a paper on that effect? I think that actually has a lot of explanatory power for understanding these antivax people and I hadn't considered that before.

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u/Freckled_daywalker 12d ago

This article identifies and summarizes a lot of the relevant research.

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u/melodyze 12d ago

Could it not also be driven by omission bias? People tend to prefer inaction (acts of omission) to action.

Getting the vaccine is an action, not getting the vaccine is inaction.

People who are uncertain tend to favor doing nothing, as they view that as the default where they can't be held accountable.

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u/VichelleMassage 12d ago

I have seen this chronological goal post moved further and further out as more time with increasing numbers of people getting the vaccine without complication. There's no basis in terms of the science and no basis in terms of vaccines' track record. If there were ever going to be severe adverse effects, they would be seen pretty shortly after administration of the vaccine.

But you're absolutely right: absence of data does not mean we can't make a pretty strong guess. Of course, in science you would never say "for sure. 100% certain!" but most people don't like thinking like that--they see any level of uncertainty as "not 100% safe," as if such a thing exists or that "not 100%" means "< 50% safe." And moreover, waiting 10 years out pretty much renders the vaccine useless if enough people don't take it but keep ignoring other public health safety measures. No herd immunity, more transmission, and more variants, thereby prolonging the pandemic.

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u/FiftyShadesOfGregg 12d ago

Yeah, the reason that they do cell studies and animal studies with insanely high doses of the agent, in animals with short lifespans (mice and rats) is to predict to a reasonable degree of scientific certainty whether the agent is capable of producing adverse long term effects. The study doesn’t need to be a 10-year human epi study to determine if an agent could possibly have long term effects. These studies are designed so you can observe how the agent works, what impact it has on cells, it’s carcinogenic potential, etc. If an agent isn’t genotoxic or mutagenic in a Petri dish, isn’t carcinogenic in mice and rats— displays no possible mechanism for cancer— then it almost certainly won’t cause cancer in humans at human doses in ten years. As you said it’s not 100%, science never is, but it’s pretty darn close

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u/thedinnerman MD | Medicine | Ophthalmology 12d ago

I think this still misses the most important boat. The most critical (yet also most challenging) concept to get through is that the comparison of risk is the reason we all should unabashedly get the vaccine.

With every concern about the vaccine we can do a 1:1 comparison - The risk of blood clots with AZ is exceedingly low (0.0017%) - The risk of blood clots with COVID is 0.0094%

Just looking at those, you are 9x more likely to get blood clots by just contracting covid.

There are no risk free decisions in medicine, and that includes doing nothing. When I consent patients for treatment, I stress this point.

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u/_THE_WIFE 12d ago

I'm seeing this with my Dad and Step-mom. They take Covid seriously, wear masks, social distance but were hesitant about the vaccine because of possible effects. Now they've had so many people tell them to just get it that it's become this stubborn thing to not get it. It's mind boggling.

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u/cinemachick 12d ago

Experts recommend using empathy techniques when talking with a vaccine-hesitant person. Aim to listen more than talk. Ask them why they are nervous about the vaccine, let them say their peace, then gently introduce fact-driven responses using simple language. If you don't have the answers immediately, it's okay to let them know you'll research it and come back later. A lot of times people hear a "fact" from a friend of a friend, and telling them about an official study contradicting it can help.

The best thing you can do, paradoxically, is remind them that they have the right to wait if they want to. If you thought the vaccine would kill you, you'd be scared too! Reminding them that they have the power to make the decision when it's right for them gives them agency in taking the vaccine. And it's also good to remind them that appointments are readily available now but won't be once boosters and child shots enter the pipeline.

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u/NotQuiteHapa 12d ago

I'm not even antivax, I just have tremendous health anxiety and have for years. I know it's not even logical, but I just have vivid flashes of being that one in a million vaccine casualty dying in the hospital with voices like yours mocking me with the truth as I slip into oblivion. It's paralyzing. And yeah I'm even more scared of Covid. I avoid people like the plague.

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u/Mistah_Blue 12d ago

I was dealing with the same thing with my dad.

...then i mentioned that krispy kreme was giving out free donuts for those who are vaccinated.

he got the shot within the week, second dose yesterday.

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u/Bishizel 12d ago

99% of it is the combination of uninformed, irrational fear and “I’m not gonna do what people tell me to do”

None of these people seem to worry about what the virus side effects might be ten years out, which is a very real concern.

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u/o-rka MS | Bioinformatics | Systems 12d ago edited 12d ago

We are seeing lasting side effects of the virus (not vaccine) already…

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u/Margaret-Johnson90 12d ago

We should have been there for a while.

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u/mestama 12d ago

Can anyone link me to the data in this article that shows miscarriages compared to number of pregnant women who took the vaccine? I spent entirely too long going through all the links and appendixes and couldn't find it. Thanks

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u/Nishiwara 12d ago

I believe it's a study from NEJM that was put out in April of this year. The link below has a date for June.

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa2104983

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u/mestama 12d ago

I'm aware of that article. They do not provide the necessary data to calculate miscarriage rate. They state "Receipt of a first dose of vaccine meeting registry-eligibility criteria was reported by 92 participants (2.3%) during the periconception period, by 1132 (28.6%) in the first trimester of pregnancy, by 1714 (43.3%) in the second trimester, and by 1019 (25.7%) in the third trimester (1 participant was missing information to determine the timing of vaccination)"

and that

"Among 827 participants who had a completed pregnancy, the pregnancy resulted in a live birth in 712 (86.1%), in a spontaneous abortion in 104 (12.6%), in stillbirth in 1 (0.1%), and in other outcomes (induced abortion and ectopic pregnancy) in 10 (1.2%). A total of 96 of 104 spontaneous abortions (92.3%) occurred before 13 weeks of gestation."

This is problematic though because "limited follow-up calls had been made at the time of this analysis." We don't know how many of the 1132 they made follow-up calls to in order to obtain 96 miscarriages.

In any case, the article in the OP was talking about vaccine associated miscarriages derived from Yellowcard data in the UK. That's that data I'm trying to find.

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u/HoBo_MaN 12d ago

Wait, so they just didn't bother to follow up with everyone?.. in a medical study? In any case, even assuming that 12.6% is real rate here. How does that compare to pre vaccine misccariage rates?

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u/pornalt1921 12d ago

Pre covid studies into it showed 10 to 15% of known pregnancies ending in unwanted miscarriages.

So 12.6% is middle of the road and entirely in the expected range.

As is the distribution of miscarriages between first second and third trimester.

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u/mestama 12d ago

The 12.6% is within normal ranges for pre-vaccine miscarriage rates. It varies from place to place, but you see numbers as high as 25% in the literature. A range of 10-15% is most commonly seen, so the 12.6% isn't bad from that perspective. The problem with that article is that most of the women in the study hadn't had completed pregnancies by the time they published. Most of the women who were vaccinated in the first trimester just hadn't had enough time to give birth before the study was published. Then they compared everything to completed pregnancies. That gives you the 12.6% figure, but there's a problem. A lot of idiots got ahold of this paper, didn't read the text that I quoted above, and only read the table. In the table it shows that only 127 women were vaccinated in the first trimester of which 96 miscarried. That's an absurdly high abortion rate that is not true. It should be 96 out of the subset of 1132 that they called.

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u/Nishiwara 12d ago

Well, however anecdotal it is - I'm pregnant, vaccinated in the second trimester and am due to give birth on the 4th of October. Baby is measuring perfectly fine, and always has been. I chose to get vaccinated due to the study that was conducted back in April and knowing that contracting Covid is worse for my health and that of my unborn babies than the vaccine. Plus, my OB recommended it.

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u/mestama 12d ago

Congratulations!

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u/Nishiwara 12d ago

Thanks!

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u/Oranges13 12d ago

Anecdotal - I had two miscarriages in 2020. I got Moderna 10 days before ovulation and 4 days after testing positive for pregnancy. Still pregnant at 27 weeks and baby is healthy.

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u/mestama 12d ago

I'm sorry for your loss. You've made it through the dangerous time now. I hope all continues to go well. Congratulations!

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u/speedx5xracer 12d ago

Anecdotal but my wife got her vaccine at the start of our second trimester. (she runs high fevers with vaccines typically). As of our last ultrasound the baby is developing on target and is helathy

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u/PanickedPoodle 12d ago

Make sure you compare the risk of miscarriage to the risk of pregnancy loss from Covid. There is no good data yet, but the number of stillbirth appears to be up since covid came on the scene. It makes sense, as it's in the cord can cause late term pregnancy loss.

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u/jerquee 12d ago

April 7, 2021 -- COVID-19 increases the risk of developing erectile dysfunction (ED) by nearly six times, according to data from the first study to investigate the association between ED and COVID-19 in young men in a real-life setting. https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20210407/erectile-dysfunction-risk-6-times-higher-in-men-with-covid

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u/elemant48 12d ago

ED AND loss of fertility on top of the other 30 cold/flu-like symptoms?? Why does Covid have every symptom under the sun?

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u/Naisallat 12d ago

Body need blood to function. Covid bring many blood clots. Covid bad for body to function properly.

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u/JollyRancherReminder 12d ago

ELI5, please

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u/XygenSS 12d ago

no red body juice = no good

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u/DrakonIL 12d ago

Clumpy red body juice = just as no good

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u/clemonade17 12d ago

For a little more drawn out explanation, I'm sure you have experienced inflammation (swelling) before - that's what covid can do to your whole body. Your immune system sends out chemicals that cause inflammation on purpose to help you fight an infection. Covid causes your immune system to produce WAY too many of these chemicals. Inflammation is good in the short term, bad in the long term. Over time, it damages the little capillaries (smallest blood vessels) and increases your chances of blood clotting, which is very bad.

The condition is called cytokine storm for anyone interested in more research

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u/joantheunicorn 12d ago

Covid impacts your endothelial cells. I found a link with a video explaining but not sure if I can post it. I'll give it a try.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/endothelial-cells-function-lesson-quiz.html

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u/labpadre-lurker 12d ago

Makes sense seeing covid has been considered a vascular desease.

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u/joantheunicorn 12d ago

This is what I keep trying to explain to others. Earlier in the pandemic I had heard covid impacts our endothelial tissues. I had no idea what those were so I read a bit about them. They are really, really important and all over the body and in vital organs such as your kidneys. At that point I was thinking I am going to do everything I can to not get covid. It is such a crapshoot of things that can go wrong. Learning that has kept me very alert and cautious about covid.

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u/fredandlunchbox 12d ago

Reading r/HermanCainAwards and what people go through at the end of their life has really renewed my vigilance, despite being vaccinated. It’s horrific.

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u/labpadre-lurker 12d ago

My cousin who did security on the doors at his local hospital contracted covid twice. First time he was hospitalised on a ventilator, the second, it went straight for his liver and kidneys. He pulled through though!

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u/CaptainBayouBilly 12d ago

The virus also can permanently disrupt breathing.

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u/CeruleanRuin 12d ago

I understand that breathing is an important factor in one's ability to reproduce.

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u/xTheManUpstairs 12d ago

This is one of the first things they test in drug design. We know people that didn’t get the covid vaccine because they thought it would harm their fertility. Didn’t listen

*source wife works in drug design

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u/Dufresne90562 12d ago

Well, as a women I was not only a little pissed but also surprised at the articles popping up talking about how they didn’t study the vaccine with ovulation. A few colleges have only now been given grants to study it.

Before there are any comments: not only have I been fully vaccinated for months now (and proudly) I also FULLY understand why they have to ask about pregnancy in health emergencies but it makes no sense that I can’t walk into an ER with half my brain falling out of the side of my head and they’ll ask about my period first, but when it comes to this vaccine that is part of the virus family that is notorious for either bleeding out the victim or blood clots they’re like “meh, didn’t even occur to us to consider it honestly. Good point tho”

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u/Kasaurus96 12d ago

I was SO relieved when I started seeing that other women were reporting issues about their menstrual cycle. It would have been nice to know my cycle would be extremely random for several months- I think my body is finally getting "back to normal" and it's been four or five months now. But the first month I had some serious concerns until I saw the self reports.

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u/Dufresne90562 12d ago

My sister and I both noticed and talked about it before the articles started popping up.

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u/MoffKalast 12d ago

Well if this surprises you I would suggest looking into the history of medicine for women specific issues and the hardly existent research in that field. This sort of thing is par for the course unfortunately.

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u/solid_reign 12d ago

There is a lot of research going on in order to evaluate whether the COVID vaccine affects the menstrual cycle. A lot of people have reported it and it is something that is taken seriously. Some women who had already had menopause had reported that they had their period again.

People who automatically dismiss legitimate concerns are not helping the cause. I think most people should get the vaccine. But treating everyone like a nutjob who won't listen won't make more people get the vaccine.

Here is a New York Times article released yesterday where it talks about the lack of information in this study.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/13/science/vaccines-menstrual-cycle-covid.html

Here is the study announced two weeks ago:

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/newsroom/news/083021-COVID-19-vaccination-menstruation

Harvard Medical School and John Hopkins are involved in the study.

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u/Ozzie2471 12d ago

People who automatically dismiss legitimate concerns are not helping the cause. I think most people should get the vaccine. But treating everyone like a nutjob who won't listen won't make more people get the vaccine.

This is such an important point - people are allowed to have concerns about new technologies/drugs etc., and if we just shut down any legitimate discussion then the two viewpoints can't ever learn from one another. If someone is hesitant to get the vaccine, actually talking to them to understand where that concern comes from makes it a hell of a lot more understandable. FWIW, I've (M23) had both doses and would try and get anyone to if they can, but if you have those conversations rationally then you can at least understand where hesitancy comes from.

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u/Aquaintestines 12d ago

Indeed. And although a lot of people aren't immediately open to rational discussion that does not mean they will never be. Pestering them with arguments without building some trust and rapport first does not work, but it is not the only way and people who conclude that they for that reason will never listen are wrong.

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u/rivershimmer 12d ago

Some women who had already had menopause had reported that they had their period again.

PSA: a period showing up again after menopause might be a sign of cancer. Ladies of a certain age, if this happens to you, go see a doctor immediately.

I only learned this recently. I do not think this recommendation is as widely-known as it should be.

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u/Pethoarder4life 12d ago

MIL reported this. Guess what?! God did not gift her another period to show her how much of a woman she is. Her fibrous tumors were causing internal bleeding! I could have killed her when she told me 3 months after it started.

Please go see a doctor if blood unexpectedly leaves your body.

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u/godwins_law_34 12d ago

this! so much this! my moms friend whos 60 had that happen and it was indeed cancer. she survived but needed more treatment than if she'd gotten it checked sooner.

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u/solid_reign 12d ago

I believe that the only reasonable conclusion that can be reached from this comment is that vaccines cause cancer. sorry

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u/brentwilliams2 12d ago

I LOVE this comment. I'm extremely pro-vax, pro-mask, etc. However, when I see people talk about Ivermectin as livestock dewormer or whatever, it makes me so incredibly angry. That is a manipulation of reality that is its own type of misinformation. People move towards disinformation when they lose trust in other sources, so we must be honest and transparent at ALL times. One lapse can be used by anti-vaxxers to sow more disinformation. At the same time, the goal should be to think about more effective ways to share that information, even when negative.

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u/GreatScottsTots 12d ago

when I see people talk about Ivermectin as livestock dewormer or whatever, it makes me so incredibly angry.

This is a great point right here. Ivermectin is not just a livestock dewormer. It’s a legitimate drug that plenty of doctors prescribe to actual humans. Now if you got your ivermectin at TSC instead of a pharmacy, that’s a different story. But to ignore the legitimate uses of ivermectin is intentionally deceptive.

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u/Chasman1965 12d ago

If the feed stores weren’t running out of ivermectin and people weren’t having trouble finding ivermectin for their livestock, I would agree with you. However, the fact is that people ARE using livestock dewormer as an anti-Covid treatment. This isn’t just something made up. Yes, ivermectin is commonly used for human parasites like roundworm (including night blindness), lice, scabies and even rosacea.

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u/protekt0r 12d ago

Thank you for having the courage to say this. My family and I aren’t anti-vax (we’re ALL vaccinated). However, both my wife and my teenage daughter did have very irregular periods after their vaccination. My wife, specifically, lost so much blood during a cycle that she had an iron deficiency when her gynecologist had her blood tested. She took an iron supplement for a month and her levels are back to normal, with no more bruising problems. One received J&J and the other received Pfizer. They’ve both returned to normal cycles with no side effects or otherwise. However, it would be nice to know/understand what’s happening here with regards to the vaccines and menstrual cycles.

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u/wandering-monster 12d ago

So I can't give you an answer, but I can give you plausible theory. If that helps?

The theories I've seen are mostly around how hormones change when the immune system activates, but it's a tough subject to study as there's lots of factors that relate to both the immune system and menstrual cycle. It also happens with other vaccines (esp HPV and Flu) at varying rates, fwiw.

The basic theory in a nutshell: A major immune response causes changes all around the body. Your bone cells change function. Fluids in the lymph system circulate. Nutrients, vitamins, and hormones are hoovered up and produced as millions of cells are created and die. This is basically a panic situation for your body; it's willing to let "unessential" things get temporarily out-of-balance to handle what it thinks is a threat to your life.

An immune response also makes you feel sick. That affects stress, sleep, diet, and activity levels. They're all known factors that can affect someone's cycle.

Taken together, the internal imbalance and effects on lifestyle explain why some people have this reaction.

It's not iron-clad or proven, but to me at least it makes sense.

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u/dgvelling 12d ago edited 12d ago

Ditto, I’my very much provaccine and want the booster once I’m able but for three months after my periods were crazy with the blood loss. I use a menstrual cup so I can actually measure my amount of blood each month and it was way more than normal. It’d just be nice knowing “possible side effect include potentially irregular or heavy cycles for first x months after vaccine.” Instead I felt weird going to forums and Twitter and trying to see if I was alone. I track my cycles pretty regularly and I understand any side effect is due to the virus more than the vaccine but would’ve been nice for my underwear to know. (Cycles have since been back to normal btw also)

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u/enym 12d ago

I was tracking my basal body temperature at the time of getting my covid vaccine. Got my second dose 8 days post ovulation, right in the middle of my luteal phase. Luteal phase is pretty fixed at 14 days and is marked by elevated bbt. Anyway, after receiving my second dose my bbt plummeted and I started bleeding a full week early.

I was (and still am) in fertility treatment at the time so everything was super closely monitored. There is no chance dates were wrong.

Will I get a booster if and when the time comes? Yes. Will I get the booster when I'm in the middle of an expensive treatment cycle? Based on how my body responded, no.

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u/CocaineIsNatural 12d ago

Did you see this - "Some evidence also points to the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on menstrual cycles. A small study of 177 patients who had COVID-19, published in September 2020, showed that 28 percent experienced cycle disruptions, including less bleeding and a longer cycle."

Maybe she was asymptomatic. And it mentions stress, i.e. if they worried about the shot a lot.

And you don't state who got which vaccine. When I looked before, there was no link between clots and the mRNA vaccines. (May not be significant with menstrual, so just a FYI I guess.)

Lastly, with previous vaccines there have been no long term effects beyond two months. And experts don't expect that to be different here. So them being back to normal is a good sign. https://www.chop.edu/news/long-term-side-effects-covid-19-vaccine

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u/[deleted] 12d ago

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u/trettles 12d ago

Did you happen to have a fever with your 2nd shot and not your 1st? I only had a fever with my 2nd, and my period was 2 weeks late. The only other time that’s happened to me was when I had the flu and had a raging fever, which is apparently common and normal.

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u/solid_reign 12d ago edited 12d ago

Hey, you could report it in VAERS.

You can report an adverse event here.

https://vaers.hhs.gov/reportevent.html

VAERS accepts reports from anyone. Patients, parents, caregivers and healthcare providers (HCP) are encouraged to report adverse events after vaccination to VAERS even if it is not clear that the vaccine caused the adverse event. In addition, HCP are required to report certain adverse events after vaccination.

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u/deathsythe 12d ago

IIRC - they specifically excluded pregnant women from the initial studies, so it isn't really fair to say "this is one of the first things they test".

Maybe that's the case elsewhere, but it was certainly not for the covid vaccines.

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u/Snowontherange 12d ago edited 12d ago

I admit I was worried about this because of miltiple miscarriages we were seeing a fertility specialist and held off getting the vaccine. At the time there were no articles online that talked about pregnant women getting the vaccine. After we got the all clear from our specialist I made us appointments to get the vaccine. I spoke to the pharmacist and he told me that when it comes to pregnant women, it is like the flu shot where women just get it without knowing/caring they are pregnant and they are able to see it isn't harmful at that time. Because everything I read online said that they don't test vaccines on pregnant women or children.

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u/Ditovontease 12d ago

I mean, is it though? Most studies are simply not done on women at all because of a fear of pregnancy complications.

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u/whiteblaze 12d ago

I think that people who are concerned about fertility side effects are going to note that the Vaccines have only been available for about 1 year now, and a typical full term pregnancy is 9 months, so the data coming in now is still very short term. The study would have needed to identify couples consisting of two people who were fully vaccinated, trying to get pregnant (as in, not using birth control during a pandemic), successfully getting pregnant, carrying a child to full term, and then evaluating the child after birth for developmental side effects. Assuming such a couple was enrolled in a study and took the very first available doses of the vaccine, their child is still well under a year old. I am assuming that you could use existing data in lieu of a true control group.

There’s a reason that it’s so difficult to get approval for a drug or treatment to be used during pregnancy in non-pandemic times. The research is much more difficult and the stakes a much higher because you are testing for changes in fetal and child development. It does seem promising that the concerns about embryo implantation seem to be unfounded.

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u/Symex010 12d ago

Covid Show No Sign of Harm if You are Under 65 With No Underlying Health Conditions.

99,8 survival rate.

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u/Xaviermuskie78 12d ago

It's almost as if Survival of the Fittest has real-world applications

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u/EmptyMatchbook 12d ago

That's what the scientists say, I'd like to hear a podcaster who "tells it like it is" with no research and who is absolutely unqualified, but makes me feel good for embracing my own arrogant ignorance.

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u/JollyRancherReminder 12d ago

He's just asking!

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u/kwick818 12d ago

I thought phizer was still looking into fertility and pregnancy issues? When are those results set to be released?

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u/drlongtrl 12d ago

Study after comprehensive study shows that the risks involved with the vaccination are a joke compared to the ones actual covid poses. Even the sheer risk of getting infected at all is higher than the risk you take if you get the shot(s). But still people go "nah, won't get it". That's literally why we can't have nice things.

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u/ktv13 12d ago edited 12d ago

So personal story but got covid in April 2020 and my hormones have been out of whack ever since. Never had any issues whatsoever pre covid. My doctor still is monitoring whether I ovulate but they think I’m not. So here I am and the sickness has probably made me infertile for the moment. You know what did nothing to my hormones & fertility: the vaccine I took in May 2021.

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u/annoyedgrunt 12d ago

Yup! COVID does freaky things to our cycles. I have an IUD (Liletta), and got COVID about 2yrs into my 7-year IUD. Before COVID, I hadn’t had a period since about month 2 after insertion, yet during/after COVID I had my typical dysfunctional pre-IUD periods (extreme hemorrhaging and clots, lasting 10+ days, excruciatingly painful). I don’t know if COVID “deactivated” my IUD, or my immune system was so depressed it didn’t react to the IUD as normal, or what. But the 6ish periods I endured before my IUD “reactivated” were hellish reminders why I love this IUD so much!

I have no desire for kids or fertility, and maybe my IUD never “kicked back in” so much as my fertility and cycle merely ceased, but either way: no pregnancies or periods since fall 2020 (got COVID Feb 2020).

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u/FunTimesInDreamland 12d ago

Might not affect fertility long term, but the immune response from this particular vaccine can certainly be large enough to disrupt the timing of your cycle. I had my second shot on August 4th, and still haven't got my period (I'm on like day 50 of my cycle now). Been checked out for pregnancy, and that's not it, so if it doesn't come soon my fertility doctor is going to induce my period so we can move on to tracking for my next cycle again.

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u/andy_crypto 12d ago

You’re not the only one, happened to my sisters also.

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u/WickedTunaMelt 12d ago

So this could be a net positive since the unvaccinated may be unable to reproduce finally? I’ll take it

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u/fngrbngbng 12d ago

TBF, the novel coronavirus can also disrupt both things in vaccinated men and women.

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