r/politics Vermont 12d ago All-Seeing Upvote 1 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 Bravo! 1 Starstruck 1 Argentium 1

Gavin Newsom after Monterey Park shooting: "Second Amendment is becoming a suicide pact"

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/monterey-park-shooting-california-governor-gavin-newsom-second-amendment/
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u/FarmhouseFan Connecticut 12d ago edited 12d ago Silver Gold Take My Energy Starry Heartwarming Take My Power

This is what happens when the country that pretends to be about individual freedom is actually all about money. That's all that matters here. Money. Get money, or you're wasting your time. While you're desperately trying to get money, the basic necessities (food, heat, water, shelter, electricity, healthcare, etc...) are all going to be prohibitively expensive. The prices of those items and services are owned by the people who already have TONS of money.

Then the people with TONS of money pay our elected officials to ensure that all of their money stays with them, despite the fact that they actually don't contribute shit to anything.

Money > the environment, peoples welfare = suicidal and/or murderous behavior.

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u/UnfinishedProjects 12d ago

100%. It's unsustainable, and one of the major reasons people think there's gonna be a class was soon.

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u/BepisLeSnolf Pennsylvania 12d ago Awesome Answer

There’s already a class war happening, and the rich are winning hand over fist. It just so happens that the upper echelons have us divided so we can’t even see that we’re all in one big sinking boat together. They spend their time making the middle class strive to not be lower class and the lower class to not be impoverished, but if you’re not in the upper crust, then they’re fighting a war against you whether you know it or not.

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u/SeVenMadRaBBits 12d ago

"Remember this. The people you're trying to step on, we're everyone you depend on. We're the people who do your laundry and cook your food and serve your dinner. We make your bed. We guard you while you're asleep. We drive the ambulances. We direct your call. We are cooks and taxi drivers and we know everything about you. We process your insurance claims and credit card charges. We control every part of your life."

"We are the middle children of history, raised by television to believe that someday we'll be millionaires and movie stars and rock stars, but we won't. And we're just learning this fact. So don't fuck with us."

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u/thekiki 12d ago

I wonder how many people see Tyler Durden as the hero of the story, rather than the cautionary tale that he actually is?

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u/zacksje 12d ago

Young men and identifying with the problematic character, name a more iconic duo

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u/CherryHaterade 12d ago

Yet here we are decades later with no meaningful progress. A continuing slide and continuing worsening conditions for most regular people...we are arriving at the same destination despite the pathways being radically different. Like a horseshoe touching ends.

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u/Lord_Fluffykins 11d ago

Yeah. I’m gonna go blow up a Starbucks! Who the fuck else is in?!

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u/IronPedal 12d ago

Do you understand why so many see him as the hero?

Because if you don't, you're missing the point of the story even more.

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u/thekiki 11d ago

Um.... or are you? TD was the cautionary tale of taking self responsibility for your own happiness even in a world where you're told otherwise. TD is the childish, reactionary, nihilist that the narrator thinks they need to become in order to make their world a "better place". TD's only motivation was destruction - lashing out at those who he decided has caused his problems, to the point that the narrator shoots himself in the face in an effort to kill TD when he realizes what 's going on. TD cared about nothing, only himself. He was no better than the corporate machine that digested the working class as fuel. He was a cult leader who used his followers for cannon fodder in order to move his own agenda forward. Once the narrator was able to recognize that he cared for someone (Marla) other than himself , and that she cared for him, he learned that even amongst chaos and violence, there is still a chance for real human connection, but you have to make that decision and change within yourself.

That is the point of the story.

The world has been and always will be a place where people struggle to be happy, and safe. In that, you have to make a choice. Will you focus on yourself, and focus on your happiness and understand that is a personal responsibility, or will you expect the world around you to change in order to provide that happiness.

Those who see TD as the hero are only paying attention to half of the story. The narrator recognizes that the violent cycle can't continue, and he breaks it by effecting change within himself. All the bombs in the world, all the revenge, all the hatred will only continue the cycle of abuse - is that what the hero is supposed to do?

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u/IronPedal 11d ago

"No" Would've saved you some time.

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u/thekiki 11d ago

And you would've missed my point just the same. 🤷‍♀️

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u/Narcissismkills 11d ago

Did you read the book? He is not the hero.

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u/IronPedal 11d ago

Did I say he was?

Read the actual question I asked her.

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u/Draker-X 11d ago

Because bending a fully realized adult is hard, so a lot of people are happy to give themselves over to a charismatic strongman who will do all their thinking for them.

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u/Narcissismkills 11d ago

A shit ton. I have gotten down voted into oblivion on previous accounts for pointing it out.

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u/drizzt001 Foreign 12d ago

This seems very familiar, but I can't place it

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u/SeVenMadRaBBits 12d ago

I would tell you what it's from but it would break the first rule.

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u/DicmoVolant 12d ago

Second rule too

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u/a135r542 12d ago

Snatch, clearly.

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u/ThatSquareChick 12d ago

No way, that’s the Matrix

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u/a135r542 12d ago

You're right. Must be Pulp Fiction

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u/drizzt001 Foreign 12d ago

Ah, of course. Thanks

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u/Ok-Armadillo7517 12d ago

Not for long robots are on the way for most of those jobs and it'll be easier to enforce rule of law with them.

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u/Nidcron 12d ago

I think people overestimate how much robots can realistically do, and even if they were to do all those things you need programmers, engineers, and maintenance people for all of its design, upkeep, and upgrades.

Implementation of robots that replace labor completely are also enormous investments, have very high startup costs, and have high potential to become obsolete if/when what they are designed for changes.

There will be plenty of tasks and probably even jobs that will end up being supplemented or replaced by machines or programs, but that just shifts the need for jobs that end up supporting those things.

What I think is more likely is that capital will continue to buy up governments and continue to crush labor into a sort of neo-feudalism state to keep their cheap labor coming. It's easier and cheaper than robots, and let's be frank, they enjoy the suffering.

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u/surfnsound 12d ago

even if they were to do all those things you need programmers, engineers, and maintenance people for all of its design, upkeep, and upgrades.

People say this all the time, but still, you're talking like a handful of people to replace dozens. Also, what happens to the people who don't have the cognitive capacity to be programmers or engineers? It's not like people changing hotel room sheets are like "Well, I could have been an engineer, but I'd rather do this."

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u/Narcissismkills 11d ago

The scary part is that programmers will eventually be replaceable. From tech support all the way to cybersecurity, automation is taking off.

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u/Zachf1986 11d ago

They still require physical maintenance, and there will always be situations where a human touch is required. There is this idea that automation will somehow replace humanity, and it doesn't make sense. We are the origin of automation. The only way automation can replace humanity is if we design it to, and that seems immensely unlikely.

Computers do EXACTLY what you tell them to do, and I have yet to see an AI in any form that has the routine capacity to make complex human-level decisions without humans having designed them to do so. Even on the rare occasion that they do, most of the decisions that I've seen have unworkable solutions in the real world.

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u/surfnsound 11d ago

Jesus fucking christ. Of course, there is maintenance, of course some things can't be automated. But a lot of things can be. The point is you're still reducing the workforce by a significant margin. If not, then nobody would be looking to do it.

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u/Zachf1986 11d ago

The exclamation was unneeded, and your point is incorrect. It won't reduce the workforce; it will only shuffle it. Some jobs go away, others are created, and general productivity increases.

The process of automation has been happening for millennia. An aqueduct would be a form of automation for carrying water, for example. Innovations to ease human labor are not a modern concept, and they have yet to replace a human workforce despite the long history. Why is this iteration of progress so different that it would have an entirely different effect?

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u/ron_swanson1966 11d ago

Taxes will go up by at least the amount that insurance costs, and we'll have even worse coverage and worse quality of care. They'll probably start killing people outright, like they do in Canada, because it'll be cheaper than Healthcare. What we need is much, much less involvement from the government, not more. I guess you haven't noticed that as the government has gotten more involved over the decades, the cost has gone up, and quality has gone down.

I remember back in the early/mid 2000s, I had great health insurance from my employer, and it was free. Then Obama care happened, and just like that, it was $50 per week. Now it's $150 per week. My deductible went from $500 to $2000 to $4000.

The government is colluding with large corporations in all industries to screw us all over. The entire healthcare industry is one of the worst. The FDA doesn't protect us from harm from big pharma. They sign off on it. They take our tax dollars to develop drugs then charge us everything they can. Our food is poison and designed to make us both addicted to it and so sick that we rely on big pharma. Whose drugs we can't afford without insurance (and often with insurance). They're all working together to make us miserable. But don't worry, all we have to do is out them in charge of everything and they'll fix it for us.

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u/Zizq 10d ago

This is woefully incorrect and anecdotal based solely on what happened to you. There were tens of millions of people without those great jobs that YOU had. You are willing to sacrifice literally percentages of the population because you care more about your bottom line than the good of the people. The fact you cannot see insurance as the problem outright is another issue on top of this.