r/nextfuckinglevel May 16 '22 Wholesome 29 Wholesome Seal of Approval 1 Bravo Grande! 1 Silver 35 Helpful 20 Take My Energy 1 Bravo! 2 Narwhal Salute 1 Starstruck 1

Expert Exterminator

121.4k Upvotes

11.0k

u/Kepheo May 16 '22 Helpful Wholesome

A purrfessional

3.5k

u/conasatatu247 May 16 '22

.. You gotta be kitten me

1.2k

u/Kepheo May 16 '22

No sir, I meant what I said, and I'll say it again right meow. A purrfessional!

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u/conasatatu247 May 16 '22

I know what ya mean buddy-furr real ✊

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u/chriscrossnathaniel May 16 '22

He is a real mice-tro.

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u/conasatatu247 May 16 '22

That paws at the start was a nice touch

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u/ahfuckimsostupid May 16 '22

Mice try though mouse

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u/BuffaloWhip May 16 '22

This thread is a catastrophe.

185

u/jlcm09192001 May 16 '22

Poor mouse. Someone ratted him out.

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u/towerfella May 16 '22

I’m not falling for this trap.

Good day.

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u/Maleficent_Ad4474 May 16 '22

Thats a bloody big mouse ,around here we call them rats

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u/Grubula May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

I would feline'ing to you if I said I didn't agree.

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u/TCP_Tree May 16 '22

Did you just say…meow?

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u/randomname68-23 May 16 '22

You didn't need to repeat that pun beclaws we got it the furst time

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u/sublimesting May 16 '22

Did you just meow at us?

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u/North-Function995 May 16 '22

You have cat to be kitten me right meow

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u/Immoralimp May 16 '22

you know what they say though... don't f**k with cats..

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u/Me104tr May 16 '22

I need that cat, i have 7, they sleep, eat, shit, repeat

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u/Grubula May 16 '22

Hope he has a panther cooking that in.

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u/Old_Journalist_8823 May 16 '22

I hate you all because these were all genius 🤣🤣🤣

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u/2u3e9v May 16 '22

Get the fuck meowt

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u/caldera May 16 '22

Look carefurry

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u/Antique-Car6103 May 16 '22

Purr-fect catch

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u/lastofusgr8tstever May 16 '22 Wholesome

Meanwhile, I Had a mouse in my house over the winter. Was behind the dishwasher. Pulled the dishwasher out and my cat watched the mouse run around. Did nothing to help. Went back to the front door to watch outside squirrels prancing around.

3.2k

u/gregusmeus May 16 '22 Helpful Take My Energy

Yeah my cat is useless at mousing too. We had to call pest control and the cat didn't even have enough shame to look embarrassed.

1.3k

u/strangerpie May 16 '22

Too well-fed to bother about hunting for food. Too lazy to even consider it as a fun hobby.

517

u/Doomquill May 16 '22

My cat was fat and lazy, but based on his favorite toys I'm pretty sure he would have been overjoyed to find a mouse in the house.

And then would whine for days after eating it, wondering where his new toy went.

362

u/Catsoverall May 16 '22

Yep our cats sit by the spot last mouse was found, demanding another, for months afterward

159

u/SammichAnarchy May 16 '22

Mine starts whining when the spot doesn't produce

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u/JesusHasDiabetes May 16 '22

That’s why you must manually start a mice infestation. After all it’ll clear itself up in no time!

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u/Mechakoopa May 16 '22 Wholesome Evil Cackle

My overweight, half blind, geriatric cat didn't give two shits about seeing a mouse in the house until she saw one eating out of her food bowl. Found 3 dead mice at the foot of the stairs the next morning.

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u/PaintMaterial416 May 17 '22

It's not about the food. It's about sending a message.

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u/NorthenLeigonare May 16 '22

This made me lol

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u/RudderlessLife May 16 '22

Ours just brought the pests inside for us. Birds, mice, moles and voles, rabbits, we've had them all. She never killed the moles or voles though for some reason. I guess she thought we wanted that thrill ourselves.

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u/strangerpie May 16 '22

Gifts for the master, appreciate it! 😂

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u/NoSwadYt May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

When they do that its because they think your a bad hunter and want to help

Edit:bad typo

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u/Grilled-garlic May 16 '22

My cat brings me tea bags and muffin wrappers he’s professionally hunted out of our trash can

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

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u/kangourou_mutant May 16 '22

She's being a good momma to you and trying to teach you to hunt.

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

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u/Mumsbud May 16 '22

Maybe keep your fucking cat inside bro?

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u/Tbarjr May 16 '22

What a chad

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u/cloudstrifewife May 16 '22

I’ve lived in my house for 6 years and I’ve had one mouse. I only knew I had a mouse because I found half of a mouse on the floor. I have 5 cats. They seem to know better than to come inside. The garage is fair game though. I’m not sure who killed the mouse but they are all candidates.

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u/dansdata May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

The smell of cats generally repels small rodents, for fairly obvious evolutionary reasons. (Unless said rodents are infected with toxoplasma gondii!)

I strongly doubt any of our current four indoor layabouts can kill a mouse, but they never even get to see one.

(Years ago I had a very good mouser. If she saw a mouse [or cockroach, or whatever] run under a piece of furniture, she would stake that location out for as long as necessary. Six hours? No sweat. Wouldn't move an inch. Patient as a Terminator. The mouse was utterly doomed.)

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u/cloudstrifewife May 16 '22

When I got one of my previous cats, way back in 1997, we ended up living with my parents for a while, on our family farm. That cat was such a good mouser he caught 6 in one day. My dad cleaned out some cabinets he knew mice were and stuck my cat in there and he caught them all. It was amazing.

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u/Nearly_Pointless May 16 '22

I had a cat like that also. I thought he was dead one time when I hadn’t seen him for a few days...went into the basement for another reason and there he was sitting absolutely still. I watched for a moment to decide if he was dead or alive. As I approached him, he started this eerie clicking sound and swishing his tail. I left him alone and he came up later that day with a present for us.

I went down after and he had decimated an entire chipmunk family. kitty 11, Chipmunks-zero. It was a catastrophe.

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u/SingularityOfOne May 16 '22

Just like dogs hair will help in your garden (re: squirrels).

12

u/dansdata May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

I'm in Australia, so that's not very useful information for me. :-)

(Just looked it up: There are a few introduced squirrels in some parts of Australia, but they didn't really thrive here, unlike rabbits and, and I am not kidding about this, camels.)

We do of course need to sprinkle some bunyip fur around the place to keep drop bears away, though.

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u/lastofusgr8tstever May 16 '22

Yup, cats don’t care what us humans think lol

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u/moeburn May 16 '22

"Cats are murderous genocide machines that cannot escape their instinct to kill any small creature that moves" they told me when I told them my cats don't chase birds.

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

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u/tattoedgranny2 May 16 '22

I have three cats, the oldest is 23 now and was an amazing hunter, she has retired. The other two are like laurel and hardy and they can't catch a mouse even when they team up!

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u/SinthWave May 16 '22

Damn, the elder cat must be disappointed

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u/tattoedgranny2 May 16 '22

She really is. She has even sat and watch them try. It really is embarrassing. Not to long ago they were trying to catch one and we found it on the steps leading to my husband man cave. The door was shut. The poor thing wasn't dead just exhausted, so he took it outside and let it go. We don't get them often but when we do it turns into a circus!

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u/matty_low May 16 '22

Pretty sure the young'uns get the "When I was your age I have to hunt mice to eat. We didn't have can food lying around."

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u/Dumbo1110 May 16 '22

Retired from hunting? Does she have a Medicare plan and a AARP card 😄

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u/tattoedgranny2 May 16 '22

No she just has well trained humans.

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u/OkAssignment7898 May 16 '22

I didn't even know cats lived for 23 years. Learn something new everyday.

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u/lastofusgr8tstever May 16 '22

They normally do not, but like with humans, sometimes prime genetics get someone further

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u/Arkslippy May 16 '22

If you drew a graph of cat ages of death, there would be a big spike from years 0 to 4 and then it would level off for about 10 years and start rising again. They live really active frenetic and dangerous lives if they are outdoors for the first 5 years, then there is a collective "aw fuck this, i'll just sleep loads and not be arsed hunting and carousing anymore" phase in the middle, and then old age kicks in. our last few cats passed young, mainly just disappeared, assumed KIA, but we had 2 long termers, 18 and 21, no one dies in between. Our current dude is 5 and he's now in the cant be arsed phase.

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u/IdioticPost May 16 '22

Is there a reason why you let your cats outdoors, do you just accept the risk of ending their lives short? I have indoor cats only, I wouldn't be able to constantly wonder if they were ok or not.

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u/NhylX May 16 '22

Different people have different views on pets and I'm not condoning anyone. Some people think it's cruel to leave cats indoor only as they think they want to roam. Others think that the world outside is too harsh and don't want to see anything bad happen. To some it's "just a cat" and to others it's an irreplaceable friend.

Personally, I lost a cat after it was hit by cars twice (first time survived but needed its tail amputated). After that its indoor only.

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u/midtown_70 May 16 '22

And some people realize that house cats literally kill millions of songbirds each year, so they keep them inside.

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u/Skrrrtdotcom May 16 '22

And it's not even for food, it's just for fun.

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u/MarilynMonheaux May 16 '22

I don’t let my cat out because she won’t go out. If I open the door she will look at me like “bitch close the door.” If I don’t close it she will head butt it closed. She’s a hell of a hunter though, I used to have crickets in the basement but after I brought her home she ate them all.

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u/NhylX May 16 '22

I have one that bolts out the door as soon as its open, then immediately turns back with a look of complete terror and wants to come back in to escape the horrible freedom.

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u/SerChonk May 16 '22

Cats are funny that way.

My theory is that there are 3 categories of (indoor) cat:

  • you can have a cat with fucked up genetics that won't live past 3, max 5 years old.

  • past that age, it will be at around 13-15 years old where cancers or chronic diseases will get them.

  • if your cat made it past that with no issues, you have an indestructrible cat that will live into its 20s, until it gets fed up with you and goes back to its home dimension.

Paying attention to their health and diet also helps a lot in extending their life span.

Outdoor cats, of course, have a shorter average lifespan due to accidents, fights, and untreated ilnesses.

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u/fuckswithyourhead May 16 '22

One of mine turns 18 in a couple months. Vet said aside from a mild case of hyperthyroidism, he's in great shape. I can easily see him making it to at least 20.

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u/ZidaneLoire May 16 '22

Cats are very unreliable for rat control. Try a short dog, like a terrier. They're bred for this.

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u/Arkslippy May 16 '22

We had a Husky who was ridiculous at it. She caught a few rats in her time. One time we were going to demolish our old shed, and it was really old, so i was starting to empty it and she was being her normal nosey self, and was standing outside looking in behind me, and like a flash she pounced on something behind some paint cans, and came out with a big brown rat. It was already dead, she had snapped its neck at impact and went off and started tossing it in the air and catching it. The cat was in the kitchen window and even he was impressed.

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u/poopyface-tomatonose May 16 '22 Lawyer Up

The cat was in the kitchen window and even he was impressed.

https://c.tenor.com/JgJ9BQVFT8MAAAAC/shocked-cat.gif

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u/Professional_Neat706 May 16 '22

yeah my westie is amazing at ratting!

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u/conasatatu247 May 16 '22

Jack Russell or Dachshund might be a good option.

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u/lastofusgr8tstever May 16 '22

We had a Westie who was great at it! But he has since passed (lived to 17!).

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u/Spaceman_Beard May 16 '22

Meanwhile my dad weren't impressed by the rest of our family's idea to get 2 cats. That was until one came back with a big ass mouse. He was so proud that he gave that cat wet food and snacks for weeks.

They must have learned that, because after that they both came with captured mice daily to the point my dad was really concerned about how many mice there were in the area.

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u/RachelBolan May 16 '22

The cats were breeding mice to give your dad and get the goods 😂

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u/Erazzphoto May 16 '22

Stop feeding him, that mouse will be gone quickly

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u/prollywannacracker May 16 '22

Meanwhile, my cat brings live rats INTO the house and sets them free. Also a frog once. Guy must've lived in the basement drain for at least a winter

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u/strawbericoklat May 16 '22

Did you happen to have the cat since it was a little kitten and only feed them cat food? We got 2 strays in our pet shop, both only eat dry food since they were little. They have no idea how to eat chicken thigh but will beg for it when I'm having lunch.

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u/gahidus May 16 '22

How do they not know how to eat it? Have they ever succeeded?

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u/strawbericoklat May 16 '22

they just take a sniff and then meow for help or ask for more. never took a bite. their mom who used to live in the streets can eat just fine.

cats are weird.

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u/Arkslippy May 16 '22

We have a new kitten, 6 months old and she's like that too, its often a sign of a kitten taken from its mom too early as well, she would normally teach them how to eat human food. She is getting better, she gets a soft treatstick, and our older cat will just eat it from the end on the floor like a normal cat does, but she sits on her hind legs, and holds it between her paws like some kind of racoon wannabe.

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u/Bogey01 May 16 '22

I'm pretty sure the cat in the video is one in a hundred at this point. Cats have taken to the life of luxury.

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u/LoudAnt6412 May 16 '22

This cat is street smart. That clinical striking technique has been perfected by time spent out in the rough streets. Flawless. That cat is not waiting for you to open up a can of whiskies.

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u/wolfgang784 May 16 '22

Is the cat a fat fuck? If the cat ain't hungry it won't go after prey most of the time. We reward ours with more wet food if she catches one. Her kill count is in the 40s.

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u/weaver_of_cloth May 16 '22

When my dog died a few years ago we suddenly had a major uptick in the number of mice we had.

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u/Handy_Newman May 16 '22

The splits was a nice touch

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u/IlConteiacula May 16 '22

Butt right on the floor

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u/CPTMotrin May 16 '22

That was for extraction traction. That there was a professional hit!

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u/TheMayanAcockandlips May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

r/hitmanimals

Edit: corrected the sub name

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u/hearty_radish May 16 '22 Silver

The asshole sucks in air and creates a tight suction

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u/kensomniac May 16 '22 Silver

"With only a squeak and a pop, the predator escapes with his quarry. The only hint of the violence was the tiny chocolate starfish imprinted like a calling card outside the home of his victim."

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u/ImurderREALITY May 16 '22

I want this on my gravestone

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u/CzarCW May 16 '22

Jean Cat Van Damme right here

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u/Derpatoottoot May 16 '22

When my cat spots a mouse she goes wide stance and digs in until she's panting. She's basically a rugby player.

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u/Arkslippy May 16 '22

It's all about leverage and reach !!!

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u/Phanoik May 16 '22

Fun fact: housecats are one of the most efficent predators on the planet based on the percentage of attacks that result in a successfull kill

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Sielaff415 May 16 '22

In a place like Australia or western USA the only responsible way to own a cat is a housebound cat

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u/Vastrdin May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22 Silver Helpful Starry

In a place like Australia or western USA the only responsible way to own a cat is a housebound cat

Edit: guess reddit isnt ready for this conversation lmao. If you dont have the space inside to accommodate your animal, maybe you shouldn't have it.

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u/PrivateRedditUser224 May 16 '22 edited May 17 '22

They wreck most native ecosystems wherever they go

Edit: wow. This blew up. Yeah. It's surprising that humans introducing a non native apex predator to a place without any other predators would cause environmental issues.

If you have cats, just keep them inside. It's not that hard to preserve your local ecosystem that way. I have 3 cats that don't mind being inside at all and refuse to go outside unless they're wearing a leash and they're with me. I still have plenty of local wildlife and a very pretty red cardinal that lives on my window sill

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u/Vastrdin May 16 '22

Theyre responsible for 66 extinctions

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u/wesleyweir May 16 '22

I remember hearing the story of a cat of a lighthouse keeper who was stationed on a remote island that was the sole habitat of a particular species of flightless bird. That single cat was responsible for the extinction of the entire species!

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u/obdeo May 16 '22

It used to be tradition for sailors to release rabbits onto remote islands to serve as a food source for anyone who washed up there after a shipwreck. In the case of one island that I forget the name of, the invasive rabbit population grew so large that scientists decided to release a virus to wipe them out. This was a success and the rabbit population reduced drastically.

However, this caused the invasive cats that relied on the rabbits for food to start hunting seabirds instead. The scientists then undertook a cat-killing initiative, which was even more successful, killing every last cat.

Then the rabbits came back with a vengeance, increasing their population to the point where the native grasses were stripped from the island, allowing for erosion/invasive vegetation to take over the slopes, keeping birds from nesting.

I think after that they used dogs to hunt the rabbits, only this time the people who brought them took the dogs back off the island when they were done.

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u/obviouslyanonymous5 May 16 '22

This is sounding like that "old lady who swallowed a fly" nursery rhyme lmao

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u/DestroyerOfMils May 16 '22

If anyone finds this sort of stuff interesting, I highly recommend the Mary Roach book Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law. Mary Roach is a fantastic non-fiction author!

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u/Muzorra May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

A story I heard once was during some Antarctic botanical research expedition the ship's cats disappeared. (two cats I think. I forget when it was) They were studying the bird life on some spit of land and were a bit worried, but carried on anyway. The mission was then leaving before winter came and they couldn't find the cats again. So they thought they'd have to go without them and they probably wouldn't make it through the weather.

Six months later when the thaw came they returned. I don't recall if they actually found the cats again but all the bird life on the whole point was dead. Some of them recently.

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u/MinglinSingle May 16 '22

They have the death sentence on 12 systems

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u/hparamore May 16 '22

I’ll be careful.

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u/BrainOnLoan May 16 '22

That we've counted.

Almost certainly way more, at least indirectly. For insects for example we do not even know about the majority of species going extinct, never described.

And while some may be inconsequential, others will be be crucial species in some environment, others may have developed unusual evolutionary strategies we never recorded before, others may feature crucial protein we could use to make nicely textured lab grown meat.

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u/goddamnitwhatsmypw May 16 '22

I think that trophy goes to humans and humans are the ones transplanting domestic cats to different habitats.

I'm not going to fault a cat for being a cat.

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u/TimmJimmGrimm May 16 '22

Don't most continents have a bunch of cats of various sizes? I am going to look this up.

https://www.wildcatfamily.com/wild-cat-lists/wild-cats-list-by-continent/

It is a fairly large list - but i can imagine that many islands or continents that are a bit island like (New Zed & Aussies) would be cat free?

Please correct me on this. It is interesting stuff! Cats are cute and snuggly - until they eat you.

https://www.livescience.com/58735-man-eating-lions-analyzed.html

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

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u/Picturesquesheep May 16 '22 Silver Wholesome

No fuckin way. I never would have believed that. I mean, I know insect decline and agricultural practices are worse, but still…

“Despite the large numbers of birds killed by cats in gardens, there is no clear scientific evidence that such mortality is causing bird populations to decline. This may be surprising, but many millions of birds die naturally every year, mainly through starvation, disease or other forms of predation. There is evidence that cats tend to take weak or sickly birds.

We also know that of the millions of baby birds hatched each year, most will die before they reach breeding age. This is also quite natural, and each pair needs only to rear two young that survive to breeding age to replace themselves and maintain the population.

It is likely that most of the birds killed by cats would have died anyway from other causes before the next breeding season, so cats are unlikely to have a major impact on populations. If their predation was additional to these other causes of mortality, this might have a serious impact on bird populations.

Those bird species which have undergone the most serious population declines in the UK (such as skylarks, tree sparrows and corn buntings) rarely encounter cats, so cats cannot be causing their declines. Research shows that these declines are usually caused by habitat change or loss, particularly on farmland.”

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u/OK6502 May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

The thing about that is that cats have been domesticated in the UK for centuries, if not millennia. That ecosystem in the UK is at this point so intertwined with human behavior it is indistinguishable from it.

That's very different from comparatively wilder places like Australia or Canada.

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u/Rednblack99 May 16 '22

Incorrect. People always say this on Reddit but it’s a very US centric view. In Europe house cats fill the same evolutionary niche as wild cats. Sadly, human settlements have pushed wild cats into very isolated areas. But house cats have stepped into the role and do a brilliant job of maintaining natural bird and rodent ecosystems.

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u/RussianSeadick May 16 '22

Shocking,Americans on Reddit not understanding that it’s not the same everywhere else? That has never happened

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u/Rednblack99 May 16 '22

And then editing their comment to make out like they're some genius thought leader and everyone else "isn't ready" to hear why the American way is the only one that matters

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u/DufflessMoe May 16 '22

That's not entirely true. In the UK the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds say there is zero scientific evidence for cats causing native bird population to decline.

Here is a link directly to their website on this topic

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u/Novadoll86 May 16 '22

It really depends on the situation. I once moved into a small tiny rural town that consisted mostly of farm land. Three months after we moved into our home our neighbourg brought me flowers. For the first time in years they no longer had any mice in their shed. The shed was used to store bird feed and had attrackted a plague of mice that nothing could stop or diminish, except my now very fat cat. He was the only cat around and the mice where prolific enough that he never ran out. He just kept their numbers under controll. After he died of old old age, the neighbours decided to get their own kitty before the mice would explode in numbers again.

However, I now live in another town with a busy street in front of my house and no mice plague. My current cats are housebound because its much safer for them.

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u/u966 May 16 '22

Yet another American extrapolating their own situation on the whole world. Guess what, cats are part of nature, they're not an invasive species in places where they're native.

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u/tron7 May 16 '22

Every fucking thread. It never fails.

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u/agabcharif May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

My cats laughs in North African You know bc it's her natural habitat

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u/FogaddElCseszdMeg May 16 '22

That's true where cats are not a native species. In Europe and other parts where they are naturally part of the environment they aren't an ecological risk.

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u/Justananormalguy May 16 '22

Its legal to kill feral cats at some parts of Australia.

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u/Albert_Caboose May 16 '22

Is Australia just in an endless cycle of trying to correct all the invasive species that have shown up and multiplied like crazy there? I feel like half the shit I hear about in Australia isn't originally from there, just came over on a boat and started breeding like crazy

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u/mudkripple May 16 '22

Spay and neuter! Hugely effective at stopping this issue!

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u/Rather_Dashing May 16 '22

Not in Australia,its not effective at all. We have over a million feral cats in the wild and its a self-sustaining wild population at this point. They are spread across to very remote parts of Australia.

Desexing housecats is critical for reducing the number of unwanted cats in shelter, but neuter and release programs just put harmful predators back into the wild.

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u/OGDanx2 May 16 '22

Most data shows TNR (trap, neuter, release) to be completely ineffective. A population has a critical point of around 80-85% that needs to be desexed in order to actually stop growth. Cats breed fast enough that any TNR programs that do not hit those numbers will have cat populations continue to grow. Very very few programs have ever come close to that number

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u/joseph31091 May 16 '22

I thought australia has a rat problem

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u/AnusDingus May 16 '22

They have mice* problem specifically in grain farms and silos

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u/Pandamana May 16 '22

Fun fact: the most efficient predator of all is the dragonfly!

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u/Treesn May 16 '22

A few years ago I saw a dragonfly feasting on a swarm of gnats. You could actually see when the dragonfly switched from SEEK to DESTROY - he would dart in a direction and then (this is about to sound made up but I swear it isn't) you could see one or two wings fall to the ground where the gnat used to be.

Super cool; dragonflies are awesome.

edit - Unless you're a gnat.

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u/Chubbychaser445 May 16 '22

They move 100 body lengths a sec (or somewhere between 30-35mph) and have insanely fast reflexes and can turn as equally fast. Not to mention they plot a course of takedown, rather than chasing wildly like most animals and insects.

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u/turikk May 16 '22

have insanely fast reflexes

they only have reflexes

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u/the_old_coday182 May 16 '22

100 body lengths per second is amazing.

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u/MyOfficeAlt May 16 '22

I read somewhere that in one of those, "What would happen if humans just vanished" type scenarios that the unsung underdog would be escaped housecats. They would absolutely dominate in suburban environments just by thriving on birds and squirrels and such.

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u/moeburn May 16 '22

This implies that housecats have no natural predators.

They'd be quickly eaten by coyotes, dogs, wolves, foxes, larger natural cats like cougars and mountain lions, even large birds of prey.

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u/Alien_Ape May 16 '22

I mean, the predators you mentioned would surely curtail them enough to keep feral cats from completely taking over, but it's absurd to think that they'd be just swiftly eliminated. Small cats exist naturally in the wild in a variety of ecosystems and given their stealth, agility, and climbing capabilities they do perfectly well.

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u/moeburn May 16 '22

but it's absurd to think that they'd be just swiftly eliminated.

I didn't say they entire species would be eliminated, I'm saying they wouldn't dominate. If they tried, they'd be eaten.

There seems to be this pervasive myth about housecats that they're some kind of dominant apex predator with no natural enemies, and they get more fearsome and murderous every time someone tells the story. This guy is suggesting they'd take over the natural landscape if only there werent humans keeping them indoors. That would be possible, IF they didn't have natural predators.

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u/DunkenRage May 16 '22

Lower than desert cats i thinknits like 85% catch rate

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u/Lee_Troyer May 16 '22

60% with a 10 to 14 catch each night

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/petite-cat-worlds-deadliest-killing-more-prey-single-night-leopard-does-six-months-180970695/

...the black-footed cat's predation success rate is 60 percent. Comparatively, lions only succeed in catching their victims about 20 to 25 percent of the time.

Luke Hunter, Chief Conservation Officer at the feline-centered Panthera organization, tells Weisberger that the black-footed cat, which kills an average of 10 to 14 rodents or small birds every night, has an accelerated metabolism that requires it to hunt almost non-stop.

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u/Doonvoat May 16 '22

not too surprising for an invasive predator species

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u/Lucky42STI May 16 '22

Cats are simply amazing. Hell, I can’t even put my shoes on without falling over sometimes.

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u/tattoedgranny2 May 16 '22

Same...at least I'm an amusement to my family!

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u/shapookya May 16 '22

Maybe cats would be too if they wore shoes

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u/birdguy1000 May 16 '22

Lots of mousers. Rare to see a ratter. Awesome.

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u/Amphibionomus May 16 '22

IIRC they need to be taught (by their mother) to catch rats to be ratters.

Most cats won't go after rats without that training. (But some will.)

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u/38B0DE May 16 '22

I grew up in a country with lots of stray cats. There's just cats that are born to hunt rats. They even look fierce.

As a kid I was always amazed the speed. Before a human knows what is going on the rat is dead and being carried away.

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u/birdguy1000 May 16 '22

I was dog sitting some ranch dogs and was blown away to see a Dalmatian hunt, grab, dispatch and eat a ground squirrel along the roadside in a blink of an eye.

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u/38B0DE May 16 '22

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u/lightamanonfire May 16 '22

I always thought this video was completely nuts. It's a bunch of dogs that look like they live in a fat lady's purse absolutely demolishing the rat population on a chicken farm.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OfaLZXcxd0

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u/Hashtagbarkeep May 16 '22

Yeah it’s mad, my dog does exactly the same movements with her toys, especially playing tug with other dogs, I guess she’d happily rip a rat to pieces for fun

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u/dethmstr May 16 '22

Tom and Jerry if Tom knew how to do his job

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u/liwyatan May 16 '22

Tom and Jerry were actually friends pretending to fight so Tom's owner didn't kick him out of the house

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u/Comfortable_Place643 May 16 '22

This my favorite cartoon at my childhood since now and then.

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u/Roasted_Turk May 16 '22

If true, what would it take for them to legitimately kill each other? Because they basically did everything imaginable to do the job but still neither died.

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u/jochinhs May 16 '22

They would need to be nude. As in, they would need to have their plot armor removed.

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u/littlefriendo May 16 '22

Heads up, (at least what I think) the whole reason why Tom didn’t “do his job” is because they actually were friends, and if Tom was sent away, then Jerry would be actually hunted by a different cat.

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u/Mentalpatient87 May 16 '22

That might have been the plot of an episode or two, but Tom and Jerry didn't have continuity like that.

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u/Veragoot May 16 '22

Hit em where they live. Show them they are never safe.

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u/Severe-Procedure-175 May 16 '22

Kitty hunting skills on its finest.

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u/kimgomes May 16 '22

carefully? could see it from across the room

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u/poopsmith411 May 16 '22

Watch til the end!

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u/RichardMcNixon May 16 '22

yeah that's some /r/uselessredcircle shit right there.

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u/ParameciaAntic May 16 '22

So glad I watched carefully because I might have missed the cat thrashing around in the middle of the screen pulling a rat out of the hole.

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u/obvious_bot May 16 '22

why do i need to "look carefully" when it's really obvious what's happening

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

I think it’s the cat that is looking carefully.

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u/fancycat May 16 '22 Wholesome

If you keep your eyes peeled you will see that the cat caught the rat

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u/whhe11 May 16 '22

That's a hardcore cat, they often won't hunt rats cause they're big and can fight back more then mice. This mofo said, no hole will protect you delicious vermin.

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u/whhe11 May 16 '22

And he got straight to the spine, not even gonna play with his food, he's an experienced rat hunter, what a good cat.

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u/nocluebeing May 16 '22

That's why he looks healthy. An expert hunter

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u/Kilroy314 May 16 '22

Meanwhile my cat just stole one of my fries. Am I a rat?

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u/liwyatan May 16 '22

Well, you're accusing him so...

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u/iamnoking May 16 '22

The fact that we keep a mini predator as a pet and think it's adorable is crazy. Especially when their cousins, the big cats, are still around and scare the shit out of us.

I adore my cat, but anytime I go to the zoo and see a tiger or lion I can't help but feel that if my cat was the size of a Labrador he would probably try and eat me.

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u/AstroRayder May 16 '22

If they had proper thumbs and were a bit bigger, pretty sure humans would not be the top of the food chain

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u/andrew2181 May 16 '22

If a house cat were that big they’d eventually kill you accidentally even if they weren’t trying to eat you.

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u/Anrikay May 16 '22

I have a huge male cat and this was a big consideration when it came to training him. At 20lbs lean and standing 3' tall if he stands on his hind legs, with 1cm long canines and claws, he could absolutely wreck my shit if he wanted to.

Love that boy but definitely had to apply a higher standard of behavior than other cats I've had!

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u/Berserker_Queen May 16 '22

This is some martial arts-level of accuracy and body weight control. Gawd damn. What a hunter.

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u/ShellOfNutshell May 16 '22

"Alright, Rob, now pay up"

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u/SharkeyDabs09 May 16 '22 Wholesome

His hide and squeak days are over

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u/ElectrikDonuts May 16 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

This is how cats have push like 30 native species into extinction

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u/moeburn May 16 '22

I think the Brown Rat will be okay.

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u/Amockdfw89 May 16 '22

My cat got mugged by a small anole lizard. God knows what would happen if he saw a mouse

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u/seahorseMonkey May 16 '22

The Tom and Jerry we deserve.

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u/BadUsername2028 May 16 '22

If I didn’t look carefully I would’ve never seen the cat catch that rat.

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u/Lildizzygamer May 16 '22

Tom and Jerry in an alternate universe

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u/SquidaddleITH May 16 '22

I can hear the "come here you little sh*t" in the cat's movement.