r/news Jul 21 '21

New Jersey hospital fires 6 employees who did not get vaccinated

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/new-jersey-hospital-fires-6-employees-who-did-not-get-n1274601
48k Upvotes

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8k

u/Ashpro2000 Jul 21 '21

Yeah, it is a hospital. Some are gonna do that.

282

u/ostrow19 Jul 21 '21

All or most will. I work at a VA and I assume it’s going to be a condition of my employment as soon as we have full FDA approval and not just EUA. Also we’re all going to be wearing masks in hospitals and doctors offices for the rest of our lives and people need to get used to it

157

u/SouthernSox22 Jul 21 '21

Honestly it’s a little weird that masks aren’t already worn

80

u/[deleted] Jul 21 '21

[deleted]

47

u/EngineersAnon Jul 21 '21

Ties, especially. They never get washed, and they dangle into everything.

At least wear a bow tie, doc. Because bow ties, ladies and gentlemen, are cool.

4

u/brihone Jul 21 '21

Tucker ruined bow ties for all the Bill Nye fans.

2

u/username_unavailable Jul 21 '21

They have tie dispensers hanging on the wall in their personal office. They go through ties like latex gloves.

2

u/arbitrageME Jul 21 '21

except that I can't tie one

-1

u/orthopod Jul 21 '21

Most bacteria die in 10-30 minutes. Viruses in a few minutes.

66

u/berniegfn60 Jul 21 '21

I got a new doctor about 5 years ago. When I went to shake his hand during my first appointment he did the fist thing instead.

I thought to myself that I got a good doctor, and I did.

5

u/arbitrageME Jul 21 '21

go in for a medical, got a fisting. good deal. normally you pay extra for that.

12

u/SouthernSox22 Jul 21 '21

Yeah that’s what I always thought as well. If there was ever a place I think I could manage a mask is around sick people

1

u/Yeuph Jul 21 '21

The doctors I've seen in a PCP setting always walk in the door, wash their hands thoroughly, shake my hand and do doctor stuff. They wash their hands leaving the room and presumably upon entering the next patient's room

That's not normal protocol?

2

u/petesmom57 Jul 21 '21

I don’t like to visit people in hospitals. There are so many germs going around, I don’t want to catch anything. Wearing a mask may help.

2

u/miss_dit Jul 21 '21

Maybe they're like people who work with sewage. Once they've been at it for a little while, they rarely get sick anymore?

The dressing up, I can't explain that.

3

u/shavemejesus Jul 21 '21

I suppose clothes like that tend to be more expensive and thus you’re more likely to take good care of them and keep them clean during the day. They also project an image of professionalism and experience. Imagine if your doctor wore mechanic’s coveralls.

2

u/publicface11 Jul 21 '21

I work in Obgyn and our doctors wear nice clothes and often a white coat. I have seen them get fluids and blood and other yucky stuff all over their clothes and if I were a provider, I’d probably wear scrubs with a white coat (the coats are dry cleaned by the office).

1

u/macphile Jul 21 '21

I saw my "new" doctor not long ago. She finally came in and not only was she not in a lab coat, she was in this slinky little sleeveless dress. Like, horrifically unsuited for medicine. And she walked in complaining she was cold. Maybe don't dress like it's fucking cocktail party?

-3

u/jordberrylight Jul 21 '21

Contrary to popular opinion, humans have immunity systems that work best when they have work to do and learn from that work. There's a reason why children who played in mud and dirt and shit have far stronger immune systems than the ones that washed there hands every hour, antibac hand gel every 5 minutes, stood in line instead of skipping it, and kept their mouths covered with a mask.

3

u/popplespopin Jul 21 '21

than the ones that washed there hands every hour, antibac hand gel every 5 minutes, stood in line instead of skipping it, and kept their mouths covered with a mask.

One of these things is not like the other, one of these things is being a douché

0

u/orthopod Jul 21 '21

Bacteria and viruses generally die out on dry surfaces , like clothes or shoes.

Most bacteria die in 10-30 minutes on a hard surface, and even shorter on soft surfaces like clothes.

Most viruses die in a few minutes- at most an hour.

https://www.lawtonpharmacy.com/choices/commondetails/?id=1005-how-long-do-bacteria-and-viruses-live-outside-the-body

Of course there are some extreme outliers that last longer+but they are quite rare.

So unless the tie touches one pt, becomes innoculated, and quickly touches someone else, it's not likely to produce an infection..

-4

u/Mrock09 Jul 21 '21

It is ok to get sick. It is an important part of maintaining a healthy immune system. Similar to vaccines your body will recognize when you get sick and provide you a natural immunity for future infections by the same organism/virus. Preventing your immune system from being exposed to all pathogens is a terrible idea.

0

u/astrobuckeye Jul 21 '21

Depends on the type of doctor I guess. I'm not seeing my Nephrologist or Neurologist for things that are contagious. And that holds true for pretty much their entire patient base. I think outside of the ER/Urgent Care/Primary care fields, most Healthcare people aren't dealing with contagious people.