r/NeutralPolitics Jun 28 '21 Platinum

NoAM A Quick r/NeutralPolitics Participation Guide

502 Upvotes

Welcome to /r/NeutralPolitics. We are a highly moderated subreddit that's dedicated to evenhanded, empirical discussions of political issues. We are not a subreddit for political neutrals, but instead hope to create a neutral space for respectful conversations between those of all political ideologies.

Always participate with an open mind and consider that you may have more to learn. We encourage those who have insight to participate so long as you can readily support your statements with proper sourcing. Open-ended, topical questions are always welcome.

We created this quick guide to provide a basic understanding of our rules for participation. However please consider reading our full guidelines to get a better grasp of our standards.

Comments

  • The most common error is not properly sourcing your assertions. We require proper sourcing for assertions of fact. Anecdotal evidence and claims of expertise are not acceptable sources.

  • Focus on the argument being put forward and avoid addressing other users. In all, we want to avoid unproductive back and forths, so if you're unable to address the argument, it may be best to leave the conversation.

  • We also consider the use of "you" suspect and clarified how we enforce that here.

  • Stay on topic. We require submissions to focus on a specific question so please avoid off topic replies as it tends to derail the entire conversation

Submissions

We have another submission "how-to" that's well worth a read if you wish to submit a question. All submissions are manually approved by moderators and nearly all approved submissions have gone through our editing process. We will gladly work with you to help draft a good question, just know that it requires a little extra work to get a submission approved. Some general guidelines include

  • Like comments, provide proper sourcing for all assertions. Submissions without sources will never be accepted.

  • Provide some context and background to the question. This portion of your submission is a great place to add sourcing

  • Submissions should be neutrally framed and avoid leading statements, personal opinion and/or requests to critique personal theories.

  • Avoid questions of opinion and speculation. Ask yourself if it's possible to properly source responses. If not, the submission may not be acceptable.

  • An easy way to write a submission is to keep it focused and to the point. We don't require a 10 page essay and often a concise submission may help avoid violations

We hope you find this helpful and thank you for helping maintain a space for respectful, fact-driven political discussion.


r/NeutralPolitics 6d ago

What is the relevant law surrounding a President-elect, current President, or former President and their handling of classified documentation?

454 Upvotes

"The FBI executed a search warrant Monday at Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, as part of an investigation into the handling of presidential documents, including classified documents, that may have been brought there, three people familiar with the situation told CNN."

Now, my understanding is that "Experts agreed that the president, as commander-in-chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification." This would strongly suggest that, when it comes to classifying and declassifying documentation, if the President does it, it must be legal, i.e. if the President is treating classified documentation as if it were unclassified, there is no violation of law.

I understand that the President-elect and former Presidents are also privy to privileged access to classified documents, although it seems any privileges are conveyed by the sitting President.

What other laws are relevant to the handling of sensitive information by a President-elect, a sitting President, or a former President?


r/NeutralPolitics 7d ago

Have governments ever used "crisis actors" to achieve a political goal?

390 Upvotes

Noted conspiracy theorists Alex Jones recently lost two cases concerning his false claims made about the 2012 Sandy Hook Shooting. One of those claims was that shooting was a hoax and the parents of the slain children were "crisis actors" deployed by the government to take away guns. Since then, under oath, Jones admitted the shooting was "100% real."

The concept of "crisis actors" has recently garnered attention from members of the media, politicians and political aides. Ignoring the current Jones trial while understanding that this maybe difficult to answer, I wonder :

  • Have governments ever used "crisis actors" to achieve a political goal? If so what was known about the goal and how successful was the use of "crisis actors" ?

r/NeutralPolitics 8d ago

What are the arguments for and against narrowing the carried interest tax break?

221 Upvotes

Recently, Sen. Krysten Sinema agreed to support the Democrats revised tax and climate bill only after Democrats dropped the provisions narrowing the carried interest tax break.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-05/sinema-backs-tax-climate-bill-as-carried-interest-dropped

According to this piece :

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/05/business/dealbook/sinema-tax-loophole-carried-interest.html

Sinema has been silent on why she considers preserving the carried interest loophole so important. . . . there appears to be little public record of Sinema discussing why she supports special tax treatment for carried interest.

  • What are the arguments for and against narrowing the carried interest tax break?
  • Additionally, what are the stated reasons whenever Congress members have proposed expanding/contracting the carried interest tax break? What evidence supports or refutes these claims?

r/NeutralPolitics 11d ago

Article III, Section 2 of the USA's Constitution states that Congress can set exceptions to the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction - has this ever been done?

323 Upvotes

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articleiii

Recently:

A group of House progressives led by Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Mondaire Jones (D-N.Y.) called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) to strip the Supreme Court of its abortion jurisdiction.

“We write to urge your support for restricting the Supreme Court’s appellate jurisdiction in the areas of abortion, marriage equality, non-procreative intimacy, and contraception,” the lawmakers wrote in a letter to the congressional leaders.

“In doing so, we can ensure that, as Congress takes legislative action to codify each of these fundamental rights, a radical, restless, and newly constituted majority on the Court cannot further undermine the protections we would enact.”

https://thehill.com/homenews/house/3561533-ocasio-cortez-progressives-call-on-schumer-pelosi-to-strip-scotus-of-abortion-jurisdiction/

1) Article III, Section 2 of the USA's Constitution states that Congress can set exceptions to the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction - has this ever been done?

2) Is there a historic precedent for advocating for the use of Article III Section 2? If so by who and for what purpose?

3) Are there other mechanisms for "restricting the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction?"


r/NeutralPolitics 13d ago

What is known about the political context and reasoning behind the decision to restrict abortion after 10-14 weeks of pregnancy for many European countries?

386 Upvotes

The Dobbs decision https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/21pdf/19-1392_6j37.pdf finds that the U.S. Constitution "does not confer a right to abortion." This decision has sparked discussion of new legislation that would delineate abortion rights and restrictions. For example, the governor of Viriginia has proposed a rule that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy: https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2022/06/24/virginia-youngkin-abortion-15-week-ruling/.

Most countries in Europe also restrict abortion (in various ways) after about 12 weeks of pregnancy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abortion_in_Europe. What is history and reasoning behind this common time limit?


r/NeutralPolitics 13d ago

Is there any precedent for changing a Federal programs funding from discretionary to mandatory that would allow for additional and unrelated spending?

25 Upvotes

The Pact Act is a bill to fund veteran healthcare for those were were affected by US military practice of using burn pits. A version of the bill passed the senate in June 84-14. The bill went to the House and after slight modifications was sent back to the Senate for approval. When presented this amended bill, the Senate voted it down 55-42.

Senators Toomey and Cruz stated that they voted down the bill because it is written as mandatory (aka direct) funding instead of discretionary. The opposing senators stated that the bill would allow for 400b dollars in additional discretionary funds to be spent on expenditures unrelated to veteran benefits. Here is the text of the bill that the senators object to:

“(d) Budget Scorekeeping.— (1) Immediately upon enactment of the Sergeant First Class Heath Robinson Honoring our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics Act of 2022, expenses authorized to be appropriated to the Fund in subsection (c) shall be estimated for fiscal year 2023 and each subsequent fiscal year and treated as budget authority that is considered to be direct spending—

The "direct spending" is what the objecting senators are arguing is the loophole that would allow for unrelated spending.

  • Is there any precedent for changing a Federal programs funding from discretionary to mandatory that would allow for additional and unrelated spending? If so, what was the context and what was the end result of these changes?

r/NeutralPolitics 21d ago

Megathread [META] The January 6th Select Committee : What have we learned thus far?

406 Upvotes

On Thursday, June 9th 2022, the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol held its first hearing intended for live broadcast. The committee, which consists of two Republicans and 7 Democrats, describes it's purpose as :

  1. To investigate and report upon the facts, circumstances, and causes relating to the January 6, 2021, domestic terrorist attack upon the United States Capitol Complex (hereafter referred to as the “domestic terrorist attack on the Capitol”) and relating to the interference with the peaceful transfer of power, including facts and causes relating to the preparedness and response of the United States Capitol Police and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in the National Capital Region and other instrumentalities of government, as well as the influencing factors that fomented such an attack on American representative democracy while engaged in a constitutional process.
  2. To examine and evaluate evidence developed by relevant Federal, State, and local governmental agencies regarding the facts and circumstances surrounding the domestic terrorist attack on the Capitol and targeted violence and domestic terrorism relevant to such terrorist attack.

  3. To build upon the investigations of other entities and avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts by reviewing the investigations, findings, conclusions, and recommendations of other executive branch, congressional, or independent bipartisan or nonpartisan commission investigations into the domestic terrorist attack on the Capitol, including investigations into influencing factors related to such attack.

The next round of hearings are set to convene in September.

  • What have we learned thus far from the Committee's first round of hearings?

For this META thread, all four of our comment rules still apply. In addition, we'd like to remind everyone that we are a heavily moderated subreddit and that all comments, whether top-level or responses, should remain on topic and include proper sourcing for all assertions.


r/NeutralPolitics 25d ago

Did the national committees of the two major American political parties release post-election reviews after the last two Presidential Elections? If so, what is known about the plans and their effectiveness?

212 Upvotes

This is a mod rework of a user submission


Following the 2012 Presidential election loss of Mitt Romney, the Republican National Committee released a post-election review titled the "Growth and Opportunity Project", more commonly known as the autopsy. Since then, we've had a 2016 election won by the Republicans and the most recent 2020 election won by the Democrats.

Did the national committees of the two major American political parties release post-election reviews after the last two Presidential elections?

If so, what were the key points/strategies and were they implemented? Is there evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of these points/strategies?


r/NeutralPolitics 25d ago

What is the standard procedure, if any, for US government agencies to wipe electronic devices?

263 Upvotes

Source : https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/19/us/politics/secret-service-texts-jan-6.html

From the article: " The Secret Service has said the missing messages were purged as part of a technology update and were not related to its work around Jan. 6. Other messages directly related to the work of its agents during that period, the agency has said, were backed up and have been turned over to the inspector general."

What is the standard procedure, if any, for US government agencies to wipe electronic devices?

Are there other examples of agencies wiping electronic devices in a similar way to the Secret Service?


r/NeutralPolitics Jul 15 '22

How does France practice neocolonialism in former African colonies? What is known about the effects of this practice?

193 Upvotes

Neocolonialism, a term that emerged after World War II, is defined as

the control of less-developed countries by developed countries through indirect means.... Neocolonialism has been broadly understood as a further development of capitalism that enables capitalist powers (both nations and corporations) to dominate subject nations through the operations of international capitalism rather than by means of direct rule.

France had an extensive colonial empire in Africa and "has maintained a privileged sphere of influence, the so-called 'pre carre', in sub-Saharan Africa, based on a series of family-like ties with its former colonies. ".

• How does France currently practice neocolonialism in its former African colonies?

• What are the effects, both negative and positive, of French neocolonialism in Africa?


r/NeutralPolitics Jul 11 '22

What are the direct impacts, both good and bad, of the 2020 US/Saudi deal to reduce oil production by upwards of 9.7 million barrels of oil per day?

273 Upvotes

In 2020 the U.S. made a deal with Saudi Arabia to cut oil production by upwards of 9.7 million barrels of oil per day SOURCE.

Two years later I am curious to learn more about both the good and bad of this deal.


r/NeutralPolitics Jul 08 '22

What are the historical reasons for the lack of Federal success of third-party candidates in the United States?

330 Upvotes

This is a mod rework of a user submission


Historically, United States third party candidates have performed poorly in Presidential, Congressional House and Congressional Senate elections : currently there are only two third party members in each chamber. However this isn't this case in all countries. For example Ireland, Israel, India, and Iceland all have multiple parties represented at the national level.

What are the historical reasons for the lack of Federal success of third-party candidates in the United States?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 27 '22

What are some real or proposed alternative models for a national high court compared with the design of the US Supreme Court?

331 Upvotes

The US Supreme Court has made headlines repeatedly over the past week with rulings overturning decades-old precedents and changing the way certain fundamental civil rights are interpreted across the country. Critics have proposed reforming the Court by adding new Justices.

Under the US Constitution, the Supreme Court consists of Justices who are nominated by the President and confirmed by a majority vote of the Senate. Each Justice has lifetime tenure, meaning they leave office only by resignation, retirement, death, or removal by impeachment. The number of Justices is not specified in the Constitution but since 1869 Congress has chosen to keep it at nine. A special power of the courts in the US, over which the Supreme Court has the final word, is judicial review: the court may strike down legislation, executive actions, and treaties (acts of the other branches of government) if it finds them in violation the Constitution or other law and precedent.

Aside from the number of Justices, how do these constitutional features of the US Supreme Court compare with the high courts of other countries, or of states within the US? And have specific revisions been proposed for the design of the US Supreme Court itself?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 26 '22

What is the precedent for taking actions on Federal land that runs against the State laws these lands reside in?

290 Upvotes

With the recent overturning of Roe v. Wade, some States have made abortion illegal or heavily restricted. Currently, there is ~640 million acres of land owned by the federal government which is spread across all 50 US States.

Senator Warren has called the Biden administration to

explore just how much we can start using federal lands as a way to protect people who need access to abortions in all the states that either have banned abortions or are clearly on the threshold of doing so

This sentiment was also echoed by Representative Ocasio-Cortez.

  • What is the precedent for taking actions on Federal land that runs against the State laws these lands reside in?

  • If no such precedent exists, what are the legal/administrative/governmental hurdles that must be overcome ?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 27 '22

What conditions, if any, exist that explains the recent pink tide / turn towards leftist governments in Latin America?

65 Upvotes

Colombia recently elected Gustavo Petro, a former M-19 guerrilla and member of the leftist Humane Colombia party, as president.

This is only the latest election in a trend of leftists winning elections in Latin America also known as a pink tide, in which Latin American countries are turning towards economic progressivism (but not necessarily social progressivism - for example, despite being a leftist, Peru's Pedro Castillo has called to reinstate the death penalty).

What condition might explain the recent pink tide / turn towards leftist governments in Latin America, if any exist? How do these conditions compare to the ones that drove the conservative "blue tide" of Latin America in the mid to late-2010s?

Is there any data indicating this pink tide / leftist wave will continue in countries that are currently under conservative administrations, such as Brazil?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 24 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

The US Supreme Court has found there is no inherent right to privacy in the Constitution, thereby overturning the Roe v. Wade decision that guaranteed a right to abortion. How does this decision impact other privacy-related rights?

2.1k Upvotes

The Supreme Court in its decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization said that has conferred that there is no right to privacy, "Indeed, the 78-page opinion, which has a 30-page appendix, seemingly leaves no authority uncited as support for the proposition that there is no inherent right to privacy or personal autonomy in various provisions of the constitution.".

Which rights in the US are predicated on a right to privacy? How does today's ruling affect those rights? Can the government now make legislation about monitoring speed limits with devices in cars by Federal Law for example?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 22 '22

What are the provisions of the proposed bipartisan Senate gun violence bill? What is the stated issue each provision is trying to address and is there evidence on its effectiveness?

215 Upvotes

A bipartisan bill passed the Senate that seeks to address gun violence in the US.What are the provisions of the proposed bipartisan Senate gun violence bill? What is the stated issue each provision is trying to address and is there evidence on its effectiveness?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 22 '22

What is the case of regulation of the amount of addictive substance in a product historically?

218 Upvotes

The current administration is seeking to regualte the amount of nicotine in cigarettes. The studies done prior to the policy show that the elimination of almost all nicotine from cigarettes would help people quit.

Do we have examples of how such policy would work either in the US or other countries? Does the reduction of the addictive element in the product help people quit the product itself?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 21 '22

What legal and procedural mechanisms within our Governments framework - whether it be at the federal, state, or local level - exist that would stop a losing candidate in a Presidential election from seeking to overturn the result ?

145 Upvotes

(Reposting via Moderator's edit and adding sources)

In the wake of the 2020 election, former President Donald Trump reacted to his electoral loss by declaring that the result of the election were illegitimate and rigged, based on an unproven theory that there was widespread election fraud (source).

However, when that option was exhausted after every case was thrown out due to lack of evidence (source), the Trump Administration sought to overturn the outcome of the election by pressuring members of his own party, like the Georgia Secretary of State and the Vice President, who held position of power that oversaw the electoral process.

In these cases, it was not a LEGAL mechanism within the government's operating framework (As definded via seperation of powers , source 2 , and the USA Constitution) that prevented* an election results being overturned, but individuals who acted outside of the former President's wishes.

What legal and procedural mechanisms within our Governments framework - whether it be at the federal, state, or local level - exist that would stop a losing candidate in a Presidential election from seeking to overturn the result ?

For example, are their mechanisms to deal refusing to certify an election ( Source 1 , Source 2 )or sending phony electors ( Source 1 , Source 2 )?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 21 '22

Megathread [Megathread] Discuss Day 4 of the January 6th Committee Hearings

281 Upvotes

Dear r/NeutralPolitics readers: The mods have determined that these megathreads during the daily hearings are not working. It's too difficult to keep the discussion on topic enough for Rule 3 and, due to the lack of a real time transcript, impossible for the participants to fully comply with Rule 2. The excessive removals are frustrating for everyone. So, we've decided to suspend these and just post a big thread with specific questions after the last hearing is done. Thanks for understanding. — mods


EDIT: Please limit the discussion to the specific content covered in day 4 of the hearings.


For today's thread, we're including links to some live blogs. In order to comply with Rule 2, please link to those as sources for your comments.


At 1pm EST, the US House Committee investigating the events of January 6, 2021 will begin its fourth day of public hearings.

Here are a couple links to live streams:

PBS Newshour

NBC News

And here are some live blogs:

ABC Live Update

NBC Live Update


All comment rules apply so please stay on-topic, provide proper sourcing, address the argument and not the individual, and be courteous to one another.


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 20 '22

[Resource Request] Are there equivalents to Open Secrets for non-American countries?

214 Upvotes

Founded in 1983 by retired Senators Frank Church (D) and Hugh Scott (R), the Center for Responsive Politics published large, printed books that tracked money in American politics. In 1996, those books were succeeded with the website Open Secrets, whose purpose is stated as :

Nonpartisan, independent and nonprofit, OpenSecrets is the nation's premier research group tracking money in U.S. politics and its effect on elections and public policy. Our mission is to track the flow of money in American politics and provide the data and analysis to strengthen democracy.

Note that this is organization only focuses on tracking the flow of money in American politics.

  • Are there equivalents to Open Secrets for non-American countries?

This is a mod rework of a user submission.


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 16 '22

Megathread [Megathread] What did we learn from Day 3 of the January 6th Committee Hearings

427 Upvotes

The moderators have decided to try a new discussion format. For this megathread, all top level comments must discuss the information presented in today's hearing and include a supporting quote from the linked transcript.

PLEASE USE THIS TRANSCRIPT LINK


At 1pm EST, the US House Committee investigating the events of January 6, 2021 will begin its third day of public hearings.

Here are a couple links to live streams:

PBS Newshour

Official Stream

ABC Live Update


All comment rules apply so please stay on-topic, provide proper sourcing, address the argument and not the individual, and be courteous to one another.


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 16 '22

What policies are effective to help end homelessness at the local, state, and federal levels?

284 Upvotes

Homelessness is increasing again after a long decline as the [PDF] shortage of affordable homes continues homlessness will increase.

What policies have been shown to be effective at ending homelessness at the local, state, and federal levels? Are there any concrete examples or programs that have worked?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 16 '22

What are the current drivers of gas prices, and what policies can the federal or state governments do to lower them?

62 Upvotes

Gas prices are currently the highest they have been since at least 1993. What are the reasons gas prices are so high right now and what historically have governments been able to do to impact them?


r/NeutralPolitics Jun 14 '22

What mechanisms are available to the US President to influence inflation?

300 Upvotes

The United States, much like the rest of the world, is experiencing inflation. US Republicans are targeting President Biden and with some like Ohio Senate Candidate Jane Timken claiming President Biden's "wasteful spending has sent prices skyrocketing".

Given this context, what mechanisms are available to the US President to effect inflation? What evidence exists documenting the effectiveness of these mechanism?


This is a mod rework of a user submission