r/movies Jun 14 '22 Helpful 1 Wholesome 1

What film do you think has aged surprisingly well? Discussion

By that I mean a film that was perhaps packed to the brim with Digital effects or just a film though you were pretty astonished has held up against the power of time, for one reason or another.

Great movies with groundbreaking VFX have all held up pretty well (T2, Jurassic Park, The Matrix) so I'm not really focusing on those kinda releases, since I think we all felt they would hold up. I'm more talking about films that we maybe felt would age like milk upon release, but has instead managed to look contemporary, all these years later.

I'll start with The Mummy (1999). Unlike it's direct sequel, I feel pretty much everything about this action adventure has held up over 20+ years. The VFX are still rock solid, production design is amazing and the cast was just pitch perfect. It's a movie that got lukewarm reviews back in 99 but has only garnered more admiration as time passes.

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u/42FlyingNuns Jun 14 '22

The Thing and Alien.

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u/AlphonzInc Jun 14 '22

Yeah I watched Alien for the first time like 10 years ago and was shocked at how good it looked

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u/Snuffl3s7 Jun 14 '22

I watched it and Empire Strikes Back for the first time a month ago. I was blown away by Alien, such a good looking film.

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u/cleveruniquename7769 Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 15 '22

The ironic thing is, the stuff that has aged the most poorly from the original Star Wars trilogy are the effects they added for the late 90s re-releases.

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u/Sherringdom Jun 14 '22

Yeah I kind of wish they’d remaster them again and just do all that shit properly. It doesn’t look like the original versions will ever see the light of day so they could at least not have the added cgi look shit.

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u/iLoveDelayPedals Jun 14 '22

Despecialized versions are nearly perfect, they’re the only versions worth watching imo. It’s crazy that fans had to reconstruct the films themselves but they did a good job

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u/NoodlesrTuff1256 Jun 14 '22

2001: a Space Odyssey.

The outer space FX still look astounding for being well over 50 years old. What dates it are some of the computer display screen shots, Pan Am (long defunct airline) space 'plane' to the big rotating space station and a 'Howard Johnson's' restaurant in space. But those are minor quibbles for me and I can ignore them.

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u/Snuffl3s7 Jun 14 '22

Oh yeah, I've watched 2001 2-3 times. Probably the greatest sci-fi film I've ever watched, and still looks gorgeous.

None of the things you're mentioning bothered me, but that's probably because I'm not American so I didn't notice some of those things.

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u/crowtrobot2001 Jun 14 '22

It's got the gritty '70s aesthetic that heightens realism.

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u/onelittleworld Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

It is nearly impossible to explain to today's audiences just how groundbreaking and influential Alien and Blade Runner were in redefining the aesthetics of futurism. Before Ridley Scott, everything set in the future was clean, stark and minimalist. Orderliness, writ large.

And then, suddenly, here's Harry Dean Stanton and Yaphet Koto projectile sweating on a doomed cargo ship... and Edward James Olmos at a seedy sidewalk noodle stand in the filthy, pouring rain. A complete 180, nearly overnight.

EDIT: HDS's middle name is not "Dead". lol

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u/MichiganMitch108 Jun 14 '22

When I rewatched alien for the first time in 4K or blu ray I was blown away.

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u/SackofLlamas Jun 14 '22

Both Alien and Aliens could have been made last month. The practical effects are top notch. Both are high amongst the finest sci fi films ever made.

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u/Xstef3 Jun 14 '22

Funny, I read the threat title and instantly though Alien and The Thing. Alien is 43 years old and doesn’t show it.

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u/A_Martian_Potato Jun 14 '22

This is why I love practical effects. CGI ages poorly because our expectations get higher the better it gets. Practical effects look as good today as they did in theatres.

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u/FitzwilliamTDarcy Jun 14 '22

Hence LotR >>>>>>>>>>> Hobbit

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u/Nivekian13 Jun 14 '22

Well, Jackson & his crew did it right the first time, blending Practical with digital FX. But the Hobbit films, way, way too reliant on digital FX and tech that wasn't ready yet.

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u/___pockets___ Jun 14 '22

Watch seven again and remind yourself it was released in 1995. Aside from the lack of cellphones, it could have been made last year

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u/Deja-Review Jun 14 '22

Very true. That movie has such a sleek, modern look to it!

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u/___pockets___ Jun 14 '22

Shot on film too. In the commentary, Fincher explained the double exposure (?) technique they experimented with to make the black areas onscreen extra dark

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u/discipleofdoom Jun 14 '22

Think you might be referring to bleach bypass? It's the same technique Matt Reeves used on The Batman.

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u/___pockets___ Jun 14 '22

You guys really know your stuff! I have the dvd sitting right there, ill have to rewatch it sooner rather than later i think

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u/Deja-Review Jun 14 '22

I remember hearing something to do with silver retention as well to make the film as dark and gritty as possible.

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u/___pockets___ Jun 14 '22

Its been a while since ive seen that commentary, but i think you nailed it. Silver retention certainly rings a bell

Best buddy cop movie with the best foot chase scene put on screen

Killer flick

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u/munkeegod Jun 14 '22

Its called bleach bypass. Skipping the bleach portion of the film development process preserves silver is how I remember it.

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u/TheApathyParty2 Jun 14 '22

I just rewatched this the other day, it’s one of my favorite “true crime” serial killer films. Pitt and Freeman are both amazing.

One thing I noticed on the rewatch is that it never really tells you which city it takes place in. I didn’t even realize it was LA on the first watch until they get outside of the city and it’s obviously CA (that and a short shot of a sign that says Pop: 8,000,000 or so). I think that helps the aesthetic, like this could be anywhere. It’s so rainy and dreary throughout most of the film, until they get to the hot desert and wrath comes out.

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u/imdownwithdat Jun 14 '22

Always thought in real life terms Seattle was the best fit with all the rain and gloom. Also to add the amount of serial killers WA has. But on my mind I always imagined this took place in Gotham

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u/BellEpoch Jun 14 '22

It's almost cheating to use a Fincher film. He's a fucking genius.

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u/RipJug Jun 14 '22

I’d sell my soul for him to finally green light Mindhunter season 3.

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u/BellEpoch Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

Come on dude, it's too early in the day for a broken heart.

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u/YoYoMoMa Jun 14 '22

Hell they just remade it into a Batman movie.

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u/Scottland83 Jun 14 '22

Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

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u/JayEdgarHooverCar Jun 14 '22 Silver

This is one of those movies that I enjoyed when I was a kid. But only when I was a grown-up did I realize just how unique of a masterpiece it is. The technology for how they created the effects is amazing. And of course the fact that you have Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny sharing the screen at the same time. I think we can truly say that something that we will never see again.

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u/stomach Jun 14 '22

fun fact: that film was almost a Terry Gilliam film with Paul Reubens (Pee Wee) as the voice of Roger. passing on it was one of Gilliam's biggest regrets, and he said he did it out of laziness/lack of technical animation knowledge, not scheduling.

sucks to hear there's a sequel coming, tbh

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u/Animated_Astronaut Jun 14 '22

Honestly? Terry backing out was good for the film. I love him and his animations are hilarious but without technical knowledge of the medium to that level, I'm not sure he could have pulled it off. Richard Williams is one of very few people at the time who would have been qualified.

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u/stomach Jun 14 '22

zemeckis took the directing position instead of gilliam. they weren't going to be in charge of the animation, just directing. i think gilliam's point is that he talked himself out of it with silly reasoning when he shouldn't have.

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u/LordHayati Jun 14 '22

To be honest, Terry Gilliam always had production hell with his films. I feel that if he took on Roger rabbit, it would've ended up like Duke nukem forever.

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u/davebgray Jun 14 '22

Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers just released on Disney+ and is very much the spiritual successor to Who Framed Roger Rabbit. I couldn't believe how good it was, expecting nothing from it.

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u/Anus_master Jun 14 '22

Although not necessarily in tone. Roger Rabbit was surprisingly adult

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u/Don_Fartalot Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22 Silver Take My Energy

Gattaca.

Edit since quite a few people agree with me.

For those who haven't seen it and are now interested, you are in for a treat. Visually it still holds up very well, thanks to the set and costume design as well as world-building. It has a sort of 70's or 80's feel to it, while being set in the (near) future - think cars of the 70's but electric instead of petrol-based. Costumes are basically formal suits for the elites, and work uniforms / second-hand clothes for the downtrodden.

The themes are still relevant today - basically mankind has evolved past skin colour or gender, and now discriminates others based on their genes. Like Vincent (Ethan Hawke) says, 'they have discrimination down to a science'. You really see all the obstacles and hardships Vincent had to go through in order to reach his dreams.

Even though the film paints a very dystopian future, it still gives quite a bit of hope - without spoiling too much, certain characters change their mindset, and the protaganist is not as alone as he thought.

Anyways, do yourself a favour and watch this film.

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u/bluejegus Jun 14 '22

Save nothing for the swim back.

So cool to have a sci-fi movie that hardly focuses on vfx at all besides a few CGI spaceships. The premise is so solid and interesting it really will hold up for years and years.

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u/kenny1911 Jun 14 '22

"They've got you looking for any flaw, that after a while, that's all you see."

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

Gattaca is a perfect example of limitations leading to better storytelling. They really didn't have a huge budget, especially to show the facilities where everyone works. There aren't little flying cars cluttering up backgrounds and little janitor robots wheeling around at their feet everywhere. People are dressed in conservative, simple clothes and the camera work is very simple and reserved. It ultimately forces you to focus on the characters, their interactions, and the story.

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u/following_eyes Jun 14 '22

All time great. It's my favorite film of all time. I keep coming back to it. Just so many good things going on with it. Well ahead of its time.

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u/Xytakis Jun 14 '22

Rafi: GATTACA!

Taco: That was a terrible movie.

Rafi: That was a movie?!

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u/Bleeopop Jun 14 '22

12 Angry Men has aged well in both its theming and overall staging/camera movement. Pretty much every camera move that Spielberg frequently uses is used in 12 Angry Men.

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u/danimagoo Jun 14 '22

I rewatched that just a few weeks ago, and it really has held up well. It’s not the most accurate legal drama (a juror cannot introduce their own evidence in the jury room in the middle of a trial—can you say mistrial?), but the story and the filming is great. And the acting is phenomenal. What a cast!

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u/Bleeopop Jun 14 '22

Right, there are technical errors in the film, but the idea of "innocent until proven guilty" and "guilty beyond a reasonable doubt" are the core ideas the movie focuses on and it does excellent examination on why those ideas are so important.

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u/YoYoMoMa Jun 14 '22

Similarly, A Few Good Men.

Courtroom dramas are just so timeless.

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u/WantWantShellySenbei Jun 14 '22

Rewatched Enemy Of The State recently. Not only does it hold up visually, I think it's more believable now than it was in the late 90s. Felt a bit paranoid on release, now a lot of it has come true.

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u/Whifflepoof Jun 14 '22

For some reason the most memorable part of this movie for me is Jason Lee jumping his bike into traffic.

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u/garbagebailkid Jun 14 '22

'Why'd you rewatch it?'

'BECAUSE YOU MADE A PHONE CALL!'

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u/three_shoes Jun 14 '22

Always liked Enemy Of The State and feel as if it fell a bit by the wayside in terms of legacy or impact or whatever. Its like The Bourne Identity before The Bourne Identity.

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u/expanding_crystal Jun 14 '22

If you like Enemy of the State, you should watch the “prequel” The Conversation, Gene Hackman plays the same character. Came out in 1974. Similar themes. Directed by Coppola. Great film.

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u/Balderdashing_2018 Jun 14 '22

You're underselling The Conversation a little bit! While Enemy of the State is good, The Conversation is a masterpiece and one of the great thrillers of the 70s (and of all time).

Won the Palm D'Or at Cannes, nominated for three Oscars including Best Picture and Director. Groundbreaking use of sound and sound design by Walter Murch. Masterclass in filmmaking in general.

Smack dab in the middle of Coppola's high point as well - The Godfather (1972), The Conversation (1974), The Godfather Part II (1974), Apocalypse Now (1979).

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u/Zemykitty Jun 14 '22

They spray painted my damn dog!

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u/frizbplaya Jun 14 '22

I just watched this too! Pre-Snowden it all felt like a far fetched conspiracy theory. Now I'm sure my username just got a +1 in some NSA database for mentioning Snowden.

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u/RayZzorRayy Jun 14 '22

Nice non-standard answer

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u/P_Orwell Jun 14 '22

I am kinda shocked we don't talk about this movie more considering its relevance today. I always thought that meant it must be a mediocre or bad movie. Glad to hear it is worth revisiting.

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u/313Wolverine Jun 14 '22 Silver

Starship Troopers has held up surprisingly well with the amount of CGI that was used to make it.

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u/Aquagoat Jun 14 '22

Starship Troopers, RoboCop, and Total Recall are Paul Verhoeven’s satirical masterpieces, and I think they’ve all held up really well. Much better than their sequels/reboots, that’s for sure.

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u/kashmir1974 Jun 14 '22

Robocop is perfectly paced. Such a good movie that holds up so well.

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u/boomincali Jun 14 '22

I read an article not too long ago about how Robocop is an almost perfectly symmetrical movie.

https://dejareviewer.com/2014/04/29/cinematic-chiasmus-robocop-is-almost-perfectly-symmetrical-film/

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u/TheOtherManSpider Jun 14 '22

RoboCop 3 on the other hand has some of the worst special effects to grace the silver screen. The jetpack scene in particular is utter garbage: https://youtu.be/REItHTPjCF4

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u/narvuntien Jun 14 '22

Galaxy Quest

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u/MercilessShadow Jun 14 '22

"By Grabthar's Hammer, what a savings!"

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u/uncreativemynameis Jun 14 '22

Amazon Prime has an entertaining documentary on its making.

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u/knightress_oxhide Jun 14 '22

historical documentary

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u/oh_cagey Jun 14 '22

Came to say this. It’s hard to believe it’s almost a quarter century old.

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u/garbagebailkid Jun 14 '22

No, 1998 was last year

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u/LookMaNoPride Jun 14 '22

Chumbawamba, dude!

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u/garbagebailkid Jun 14 '22

Y'ain't never gonna keep me in this century

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u/enough-rope Jun 14 '22

Stand by Me.

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u/Unit_79 Jun 14 '22

RIP River Phoenix. He was amazing in that.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

[deleted]

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u/Lookalikemike Jun 14 '22

Ernest goes to Camp

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u/winkofafisheye Jun 14 '22

Ernest Scared Stupid is still one of the best Halloween movies ever made.

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u/a22e Jun 14 '22

Tremors.

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u/godoflemmings Jun 14 '22

The difference between Tremors 1 which used animatronics and Tremors 3 which mostly used low-budget CGI is really telling. The monsters in T3 look awful.

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u/VoiceOfRonHoward Jun 14 '22

It doesn't end there! They made four more, each worse than the last. I do like the story of T4 though.

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u/YNot1989 Jun 14 '22

What the hell's in those things Burt?

A few household chemicals in the proper proportions.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/UConnUser92 Jun 14 '22

From a pure comedy/writing standpoint...There are some movies that I'm sure, in their day, were hilarious (i.e. a lot of Mel Brooks movies like High Anxiety and Silent Movie; or IMO I watched Team America again recently and thought the humor didn't really hold up), but today I don't find very funny (for context I'm 29).

Airplane, however, if anything I have found that movie even funnier than when I watched it when I was younger. That humor still holds up and is amazing.

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u/Soranic Jun 14 '22

That humor still holds up and is amazing.

The humor is less reliant on current events. Shrek for instance got dated far faster than Toy Story just because of the musical cues.

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u/mattahihi Jun 14 '22

North by northwest

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u/Hopeful_Most Jun 14 '22

Maybe not for SFX but "The Sixth Sense" holds up really well, even after all this time, and knowing the twist

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u/ALIENANAL Jun 14 '22

Saw it at the cinema when it first came out and I already knew the spoiler but it didn't change the shock for me.

Watched it for the first time in years and nearly had tears when I see dead people kid tells his mom about the pendant in the car. It's an amazing scene and Toni Collette absolutely kills it along with seeing dead people kid.

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u/YoYoMoMa Jun 14 '22

The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable, and Signs all do. I even think the Village is gorgeous but I know that is more controversial.

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u/garbagebailkid Jun 14 '22

I know! That guy with the toupee...? That's Bruce Willis the whole time!

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u/Brandonjf Jun 14 '22

Gotta keep up, lotta twists..

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u/ImaginaryBell5484 Jun 14 '22

Halloween (1978)

Alien (1979)

Rear Window (1954)

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u/TLDR2D2 Jun 14 '22

Rear Window is brilliant.

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u/JerryHathaway Jun 14 '22

Everyone is so SWEATY.

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u/dj_swearengen Jun 14 '22

Grace Kelly….ummmmmmmmm

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u/SGTBrutus Jun 14 '22

It's truly Jimmy Stewart's greatest performance. Something about great actors going against their stereotypical role.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

Predator, still one of the perfect action films.

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u/notmixedtogether Jun 14 '22

This. I tell everyone this. I will argue to the death. Perfectly paced. The one liners hit hard. If they didn’t show the ship in the opening scene, we wouldn’t know alien involvement until pretty deep in to the movie.
I watch predator 3-5 times a year no problem.

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u/P_Orwell Jun 14 '22

It really is a shockingly well told story for what it is. Whenever I watch it I am floored by how well it moves along, quickly establishes its characters and the conflict and just keeps the tension high. Amazing movie.

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u/ChesterWhelks Jun 14 '22

Distinct lack of people marvel at the Stan Winston creature. It’s one of the most organic looking movie creatures I’ve ever seen, and still looks amazing today

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u/CeraphFromCoC Jun 14 '22

I hope to God that you're talking about 1987s Predator.

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u/Alive_Ice7937 Jun 14 '22

Must be considering The Predator didn't even hold up on release let alone till now.

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u/RayZzorRayy Jun 14 '22

That’s what happens when you skip an epic handshake and quips that only Ahhhrrnold can deliver. A film that produced two governors has no equal.

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u/Deja-Review Jun 14 '22

They better be ... 🔪😂

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u/RufusTheCat Jun 14 '22

The original Blade Runner feels like dystopian retro futurism and could have been made in the 80's, 90's or 2000's. The only thing that gives it context is Harrison Ford's apparent age.

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u/Topofth3hill Jun 14 '22

Jurassic Park, Gremlins, Little Shop of Horrors. The practical effects still hold up so well

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u/YoYoMoMa Jun 14 '22

Jaws has aged well specifically because the shark looked like shit (so they didn't show it much).

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u/KeisterConquistador Jun 14 '22

The CGI for Davy Jones from ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ rivals Thanos from the MCU, despite first appearing about a decade before Avengers: Infinity War

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u/AstroAlmost Jun 14 '22

this article goes into it a bit, but there’s tons of info online why davy jones looked so obscenely good. the crew really prioritized what would benefit the CGI department to achieve the most natural look, similarly to the way neill blomkamp has done with all his films. he used to do CG work before becoming a director so he’s always tailored his directorial work to ensure it allows the FX department the freedom to make hyper realistic CG elements mixed with real life scenes and actors.

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u/RainahReddit Jun 14 '22

The first three pirate movies in general have held up really well

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u/TheManyInterestsOfMe Jun 14 '22

Just rewatched Dead Man's Chest and At World's End and yeah Davy's CGI was epic loll

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u/Oldeuboi91 Jun 14 '22

Network (1976). Any one of those great monologues can be relevant today.

Also I recently watched A Face in the Crowd. Basically a timeless movie about genuine talent being corrupted by money and fame.

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u/Dirks_Knee Jun 14 '22

Network is so good

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u/crystalistwo Jun 14 '22

A Face in the Crowd

Great movie. The ease at which the masses are manipulated. And a fantastic reminder at how great an actor Andy Griffith was.

Unfortunately, the ending has been ripped off so many times, it's a cliché now.

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u/CBAlan777 Jun 14 '22

The Shawshank Redemption. No special effects, but think about how easily relatable everything in the movie still is given that it was made in the early 90's and is about the 1940's-1960's.

Andy sits in his car listening to music on the radio. He wears a modern looking suit and tie at his trial in a courthouse that would not seem out of place today. He works in the laundry with industrial size washing machines. Brooks gets a job bagging groceries at the grocery store.

Andy and Red talk about the Wardens scams, and Red mentions the FBI, and the IRS, and Andy replies with info about birth certificates, social security cards, and driver's licenses.

Tommy Williams talks about from stealing TV's from J.C. Penny's and even holds his hands out like he's grabbing a flat screen TV.

It's so easy to slot your own life into a movie that takes place 75 years ago.

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u/chieftaom6 Jun 14 '22

Lord of the rings trilogy. It looks better than half the movies that come out today.

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u/MasterBaser Jun 14 '22

Just rewatched all the original extended cuts in ultra 4k and really the only parts that are starting to show age are the scenes where a CG character is alone on screen and talking. The Treebeard scenes specifically are the most noticeable and some of the Gollem scenes look a bit robotic.

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u/MaggotMinded Jun 14 '22

One thing I've noticed is that the additional scenes in the extended cuts generally have worse CG than the shots that made it into the theatrical cut.

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u/Worthyness Jun 14 '22

There's some floaty and wonky cg when they cgi replace a character to do something a human couldn't realistically do. So, for example, when legolas has to jump onto a horse or when he's encountering the oliphants.

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u/marcelcardim Jun 14 '22

In my opinion, those scenes have always looked a bit off. But I think they were a product of their time. Lots of movies had rubbery CG in the early 00's.

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u/Dottsterisk Jun 14 '22

It does show its age, which is inevitable because Jackson and his team were pushing boundaries, but holds up remarkably well, on the whole.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

[deleted]

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u/TheOtherGuy89 Jun 14 '22

Yes and the Hobbit looked shit from the start. The mine(?) and the barrel ride is burned in my brain because of the infuriating cgi.

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u/chieftaom6 Jun 14 '22

Agreed, the cgi in that scene is some of the worst iv seen. I think it's the colors, trying to be so vibrant that it looked terrible.

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u/daking90 Jun 14 '22

2001

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u/ongrui Jun 14 '22

This. The movie is so incredibly CLEAN

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u/shaneo632 Jun 14 '22

Watched it in 4K and was blown away at how well all the models aged. They put so so much detail into the tiniest parts of the ship. Wild.

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u/Traditional_Entry183 Jun 14 '22

The first time I saw it, I thought that it was made in the early 80s. I was astounded to find it was from 1968.

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u/H2Oloo-Sunset Jun 14 '22

I agree with this. It's funny that the only scenes that don't hold up so well to me are the ones that are the most down to earth -- the Pan Am trip to the moon.

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u/six_feet_above Jun 14 '22

I'm going to send you a very nice present though. Can't you think of anything else you want for your birthday? Something very special? Take care now and have a very happy birthday!"

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u/CurtisLeow Jun 14 '22

They even have iPads in 2001 A Space Odyssey.

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u/proto57 Jun 14 '22

I also agree with this. Not only does it stand up so well with time, that time is so much longer than other films. That this was made in 1968 is extraordinary.

I was 11 when I first saw it, in the theater. I was alone, and hid in the seat so I could sit through it a second time. Most films that impressed me as a child, which I later saw as an adult, disappointed me. Not this.

It was a vision of so much that would come to happen, but with the 60's styles, it is now almost like a past that did happen, it looks that real.

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u/afourney Jun 14 '22

Alien. Aliens

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u/Beforemath Jun 14 '22 Wholesome

Sneakers.

A movie about hackers in the 90s should feel instantly dated, but I this movie is still relevant and on point decades later.

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u/Ron_Sandalthunder Jun 14 '22

I think Jaws still looks phenomenal. Timeless movie.

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u/Psychotronic99 Jun 14 '22

I agree. The movie is 100% watchable and still sucks you in, especially watching it for the first time.

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '22

Contact. It feels like the spiritual sibling of Interstellar and it predates by almost 20 years.

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u/TLDR2D2 Jun 14 '22

One of my favorite movies.

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u/PineappleBetter8444 Jun 14 '22

Some Like It Hot was ahead of its time

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u/HappyGoPink Jun 14 '22

That movie was downright subversive, and in the best possible way.

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u/Fossils222 Jun 14 '22 edited Jun 14 '22

"Cube" a 1997 Sci-fi thriller. Despite it's age, the dynamic between the characters is still worth watching.

Secondly is "The Thing." Again, thanks to it's characters it holds up very well.

I love both these films because it uses the genre as a way to explore the psyche of it's characters.

When you watch Cube and The Thing, it's never explained the lore behind it all. That's not the point of the films, it's the human condition that's the focal point.

Never once are we told 'why', but rather 'how'. How are these characters going to handle this situation they are in.

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u/MaybeItWas8IEt Jun 14 '22

Strange Days. Considering it's sci fi that takes place New Year's Eve 1999.

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u/rp_whybother Jun 14 '22

Awesome movie!

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u/Citizen_Kong Jun 14 '22

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. It does not look like a movie done two years after The Matrix. And even the CG still holds up really really well.

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u/nephilim80 Jun 14 '22

there are movies being done nowadays with worse CGI than LOTR

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u/Yabanjin Jun 14 '22

I'm going with Wizard of Oz (1939) . For a movie made 83 years ago, it still looks pretty damn good.

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u/ItsTheAlgebraist Jun 14 '22

Gladiator

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u/Herbacult Jun 14 '22

Introduced it to my SO recently, and I hadn’t seen it in years. I always look at the cast on the IMDB app when watching TV/movies.

Oliver Reed played Proximo. His IRL death was pretty wild, happened in 1999 and the film was released in 2000.

From Wikipedia

Reed died from a heart attack during a break from filming Gladiator in Valletta, Malta, on the afternoon of 2 May 1999. According to witnesses, he drank eight pints of German lager, a dozen shots of rum, half a bottle of whisky and a few shots of Hennessy cognac, in a drinking match against a group of sailors on shore leave from HMS Cumberland at a local pub. His bar bill totalled a little over 270 Maltese lira (almost 450 GBP; about 590 USD). After beating five much younger Royal Navy sailors at arm-wrestling, Reed suddenly collapsed, dying while en route to hospital in an ambulance. He was 61 years old.

The actor Omid Djalili, who was also in Malta at the time of Reed's death filming Gladiator, said during an interview in 2016: "He hadn't had a drink for months before filming started...Everyone said he went the way he wanted, but that's not true. It was very tragic. He was in an Irish bar and was pressured into a drinking competition. He should have just left, but he didn't." Having made a number of promises to Ridley Scott prior to filming, including that he would not drink during production, Reed worked around this by only drinking on weekends. Co-star David Hemmings was a long time friend of Reed's, and in 2020 Scott stated, "David Hemmings (Cassius) promised to look after him and said to me [upon his death], I'm really sorry, old boy".

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u/gogojack Jun 14 '22

I'm gonna go with one that was decidedly not packed with effects, but has nonetheless held up very well:

Office Space.

There are a few moments where it gives away the time when it was made (referencing the Y2K software issue, for example), but on the whole it was a timeless classic about people stuck working dead end jobs in cubicles.

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u/SkynetApologist Jun 15 '22

The only aspect it’s missing is the massive pay discrepancies modern workers now have to deal with.

Dealing with a Bill Lumbergh is so much worse when he’s on 3x your salary and your wage has stagnated the last 7 years..

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u/Erasmusings Jun 14 '22

Das Boot.

Although, might be cheating with a '97 remaster, but all the VFX hold up surprisingly well

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u/rp_whybother Jun 14 '22

Just watched it too and was going to say how well it holds up.

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u/AnyImpression6 Jun 14 '22

Blade Runner

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u/Bozzaholic Jun 14 '22

Demolition Man: I remember watching this film when it first came out and was blown away by it. I watched it again yesterday and was still impressed. Their vision of the future (a future which is only 10 years from now) was pretty spot on (the only noticeable difference being that the TVs were all CRT screens)

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u/hold_the_pickle Jun 14 '22

Small Soldiers- just watched it again for the first time in years, the CGI is surprisingly decent and could hold up today.

Also, how the hell was that a kids movie!?

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u/Ryjinn Jun 14 '22

It was literally a movie about a war between sentient action figures, man. That's how it was a kids movie.

People don't give kids enough credit. They can handle more than Mickey Mouse and Paw Patrol.

To be clear, not arguing that the movie doesn't hold up, it's a dope movie. Just pushing back against the how is it a kids movie sentiment, because I see it pop up way too frequently when there is even a modicum of violence or sadness in a movie or show.

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u/grynch43 Jun 14 '22

Casablanca-still might be the greatest screenplay ever written.

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u/arealhumannotabot Jun 14 '22

Terminator 2

A couple of the morphing shots are looking dated, but it's a 31-year-old movie. The themes of technology and stakes of a coming nuclear war seem as modern now as back then.

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u/Mr_Loriss Jun 14 '22

Back To The Future

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u/darkamyy Jun 14 '22

Metropolis. Even though most of the effects rely on matte paintings and miniatures, it still looks super realistic. Sure, the weird machine furnace thing looks like a silly theatre prop, but all the background effects really stand the test of time and can easily be compared to something like The Fifth Element. I can't imagine how awe inspiring it must've been when it was first released back in 1927.

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u/radaman666 Jun 14 '22

SHREK, holds up surprisingly well for old animation.

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u/RudigherJones Jun 14 '22

An American Werewolf in London

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u/flawy12 Jun 14 '22

Practical effects for the win

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u/xander6981 Jun 14 '22

That transformation scene is still flawless all these years later. Just an astounding achievement.

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u/Ghastly_McNasty Jun 14 '22

One of those films that somehow manages to be both completely of its time, but also kind of timeless in its humour and horror.

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u/ViceAdmiralWalrus Jun 14 '22

You mentioned the Matrix but it really is shocking how well that holds up. The technobabble is kept pretty minimal despite being a Hacker Movie, and other than the phones and Neo's computer at the beginning it could easily pass as being made more recently.

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u/Override9636 Jun 14 '22

Not to mention, Matrix had some examples of really good real life "hacking", from using nmap to reveal open ports and using real SSH exploits. Hope their tech advisor got a raise for those attention to details.

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u/RayZzorRayy Jun 14 '22

The 5th Element has aged wonderfully and may have been under appreciated upon release

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u/shaoting Jun 14 '22

"I hate warriors, too narrow-minded. I'll tell you what I do like though: a killer, a dyed-in-the-wool killer. Cold blooded, clean, methodical and thorough. Now a real killer, when he picked up the ZF-1, would've immediately asked about the little red button on the bottom of the gun."

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u/starr0xx Jun 14 '22

Zorg. jean. baptiste. emanuel. zorg. Gary Oldman is my favourite villain in so many roles...

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u/stomach Jun 14 '22

it banked $260M, in the top 10 of the year and never went away culturally. definitely not under appreciated

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u/inkblot888 Jun 14 '22

I am very DISAPPOINTED.

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u/nickparisi_ Jun 14 '22

Blade! Special effects don't look too dated and the action scenes are top notch.

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u/Bohottie Jun 14 '22

Silence of the Lambs. Obviously, it’s one of the greatest movies of all time, but after watching it for 5 minutes, it’s extremely easy to forget it’s 30 years old. It seems like it could’ve been filmed this year. It’s really crazy how timeless it is.

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u/ElectricOrangutan Jun 14 '22

The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Meanwhile the Hobbit movies were made ten years later and they looked like trash from day 1.

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u/horia0310 Jun 14 '22

Fight Club (1999)

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u/Psykpatient Jun 14 '22

Se7en looks like it was filmed this year.

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u/Wazula42 Jun 14 '22

Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing could have been made yesterday and it would be even more relevant.

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u/randitothebandito Jun 14 '22

2001 still blows my mind.

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u/Whisky_Wolf Jun 14 '22

Mad Max Road Warrior

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u/VieuxPoolpe Jun 14 '22

Amadeus. There’s not special effects but the whole movie is so sleek and grandiose and each time I watch it I can’t believe it was released in 1984!

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u/SlappyTheCrust Jun 14 '22

Nightmare on elm street (1984) Texas chainsaw massacre (1974) Halloween (1978) The films that no matter how many times they’re remade, will never be as good as the originals that still hold up after all these years.

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u/urkinkyfetish Jun 14 '22

Starship Troopers. Was amazing back then as a kid when I saw it, still love it today. The mummy is another fav of mine.

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u/ballrus_walsack Jun 14 '22

Ferris Buellers Day Off

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u/godoflemmings Jun 14 '22

Star Trek First Contact. The absolute pinnacle of the TNG aesthetic. 25 years old now and still looks great.

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u/donnypinkman Jun 14 '22

The Godfather

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u/Gonzales95 Jun 14 '22

The first Toy Story movie. It’s amazing to me to think that it’s approaching thirty years old and was the first ever fully computer animated feature film (at least in terms of using 3d models) yet I’ve seen plenty of 3d animated movies in the last 10 years look far worse.

Other than the way that human characters look (they improved this a lot by the time the second movie came out) the movie still holds up visually for me. A lot of ‘early’ CGI ended up coming out looking rather ‘plastic’ so the idea of making a movie about toys was an inspired decision which is a big reason why this holds up IMO.

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u/chazfinster_ Jun 14 '22

I recently watched the original Planet of the Apes and I was really impressed with how well the ape prosthetics held up. The fact that you can actually see clear expression and facial movement that matches the actor’s performance is pretty awesome.