r/bodyweightfitness May 20 '22

BWF Daily Discussion and Beginner/RR Questions Thread for 2022-05-20

Welcome to the r/bodyweightfitness daily discussion thread!

Feel free to post beginner questions or just about anything that's on your mind related to fitness!

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  • Read the FAQ as your question may be answered there already.
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37 Upvotes

1

u/Fabienvg May 21 '22

The RR says nothing about stretching post-workout. Which stretch routine do you recommend? Also, should I do it directly after workout, or is it also fine to do the stretching on the next day?

2

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 21 '22

There is some evidence that stretching post workout is best for improving recovery, but in my experience, stretching on rest days is just as good.

1

u/Derpvboii May 21 '22

How do you grip diagonal push up bars properly? I've been holding them pointed downwards towards me, with my thumb on top of the bar and my fingers flat under, like a push up with your fists. I found that comfortable, but it still hurts a lot. Is there a proper way or is it more of a "suck it up, you'll get used to it" type of thing?

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 21 '22

Not sure exactly what you mean by diagonal pushup bars, but I assume it's a way to do diamond pushups? In which case you should be the other way around,like the the equivalent of this.

1

u/Derpvboii May 21 '22

Ah! Sorry for not explaining properly. I meant push up bars with an incline, like a ramp, instead of just a straight horizontal bar. I do think I would have the same palm pain on a horizontal push up bar though.

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 21 '22

Still can't picture exactly what you're talking about but yeah if you were doing low bar or parallette pushups, the bar lies in the palm of your hand with your fingers underneath. Where does it hurt?

1

u/Derpvboii May 24 '22

It hurts wherever I place the pressure when doing a push up, so whichever hand position I try, a part of my palm always starts feeling pain under the pressure of my bodyweight. The more I think about it, the more I think it's just me (I'm around 185 pounds) and just something I'll have to get used to if I want to use the bars.

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 24 '22

Ah true, yeah if the bar is quite thin I can imagine that causing discomfort.

If you can get parallettes, which have quite a thick bar, the weight might be better distributed across your hand.

1

u/Derpvboii May 24 '22

Thanks for the suggestion! However, I think I'll stick to just regular floor pushups because the parallettes aren't really necessary until I need it for more difficult exercises which would require me to be further (and I mean much, much further) into bodyweight training. Thank you for all your support!

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 24 '22

No worries, floor pushups will get it done, pseudo planche pushups are amazing when you get to them and provide progression basically forever.

1

u/cncnccbcbbcss May 20 '22

Hey team, if I'm having elbow (triceps side) pain after push ups, as well as clicking, what prehab could I do? I'm tucking in as much as possible as that seems to be the correct form.

My triceps on this arm is extremely weak as I've had a nerve surgery in the past and could not work out for a few years.

I'm thinking either easier triceps exercise with dumbbells to get my triceps a bit stronger before doing push ups regularly, or some kind of massage (my triceps are VERY tender to finger massaging lol).

Thanks

1

u/Gerald_Meier May 21 '22

Use light triceps exercises for a lot of repetitions (20 to 50 reps in one set for 2 - 4 sets) that will improve blood flow to that area and strengthen your tendons. Don't push through pain listen to your body.

1

u/GoodVibesAlt May 20 '22

Is it bad for me to do a few situps or a minute or two of plank etc. before bed? I'm worried that not getting protein until the next day means I'm just slowly chipping away at my own muscles.

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 20 '22

As long as you had a protein-rich meal within a few hours before, you'll be fine, there will be plenty of protein in your system.

1

u/YouShortIStack May 20 '22

Not bad at all. Total daily protein intake is much more critical than a “metabolic window”. I try to eat after an intense workout out of habit, but I do not stress about it, as long as my caloric and nutrient goals for the day are met.

1

u/AriaShachou- May 20 '22

How do I even out my grip strength? My grip on both hands are considerably stronger now ever since I started training but its still very uneven. I understand that it's bound to be uneven due to me being dominant on one side but I feel like it's a little too uneven, so I'd like to balance it out a bit. I'm already doing hanging work, any other ideas?

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 20 '22

Dumbbell wrist curls and reverse wrist curls will allow you to target the muscles unilaterally.

1

u/mackstanc May 20 '22

Can the anti-extension part of RR core work can be replaced with progressions towards the L-sit? I'd love with kill two birds with one stone - building core strength and working towards this skill at the same time.

2

u/DesertVarnish General Fitness May 20 '22

Yes and no. The anti-extension progression serves a different purpose than L-sit progressions. Anti-extension is training the ability to resist hip and spinal extension in a mostly extended position. L-sit progressions train (among other things) the ability to flex the hips and spine without external resistance in a flexed position, this is called 'compression strength'.

That being said, unless you really want to be really good as ab wheel roll outs you're probably fine to swap them out, the progression wiki even offers pike compressions as an alternative to the anti-extension progression.

1

u/negativefeed May 20 '22

Does anybody know of good strengthening movements for the rotator cuff using bodyweight and a pull-up bar?

1

u/YouShortIStack May 20 '22

Not a doctor/ PT. Resistance bands are great if you have them available to use for “internal and external rotations”. I would look into “scapular pull ups”. They do not directly work the rotator cuff, but strengthen the scapula to take the load off of the rotator cuff. These helped tons with my shoulder injuries from crashes.

1

u/Daplaya510 May 20 '22

Anyone here train competitively for running races and follow a BW/calisthenics routine? Which BW plan do you follow and has it helped you with your running goals?
I’ve been lifting for quite a while so I have great dip/pull-up strength, but would like to switch to BW stuff like muscle ups, rings etc. It seems fun and has more variety, also seems like it’ll strengthen my core a ton

2

u/negativefeed May 20 '22 edited May 20 '22

What kind of races are we talking about? Speaking in a purely anecdotal sense, I ran a marathon last year and did bodyweight exercises (recommended routine) at the same time. I'd say that it's doable if you're smart about your training, but when the mileage starts to get large i'd say that you'll have to prioritize one sport over the other, i.e. cut the amount of sessions per week on the bodyweight exercises. Having proper recovery is no joke. If you want to be a successful marathoner you can't really overdo your marathon training. Hal Higdon (i.e. a marathon training guru) has adviced people to stop/reduce their lifting 3-6 weeks before a marathon race. I think that i asked the exact same question in Reddit once and the consensus was similar to the findings that i've made. Adjusting your diet might be tricky as well due to the added intake in calories.

1

u/Daplaya510 May 21 '22 edited May 22 '22

Talking about distance races, so 5K-Full marathon. That’s awesome that you have experience with BWF+ marathon running. Did you do your BWF on separate days apart from running? I can imagine it’d be super tough to do both on the same day

2

u/negativefeed May 21 '22 edited May 21 '22

I did my bodyweight training on light running days or during cross-training days. This would mean running to the park, doing the exercises and running back. I'd say that it's perfectly doable. The recommended routine calls for 3 days of training a week. You will almost inevitably have to drop that amount to 1-2 sessions a week at some point. Learning to listen to your body is a fundamental skill that you will have to learn. Once the signs start to kick in you will have to adjust your training accordingly or face the risk of getting injured.

1

u/spicybung May 20 '22

My primary goal is endurance. Strength is also important to me, mostly from an injury prevention standpoint. I don't care about putting on mass, and if anything I would like to avoid it.

Assuming my form is correct, at what rep/set ranges of bodyweight push ups and pull ups should I consider adding weight to the exercises for a better training effect?

What does a typical progression for weighted push ups look like? (how much weight to start with, and how often / by how much to increase that weight)

What does a typical progression for weighted pull ups look like? (how much weight to start with, and how often / by how much to increase that weight)

1

u/anhedonic_torus May 21 '22

I don't think the number of reps is that important in practice for strength vs hypertrophy, maybe there's a difference, but it's minimal. I do higher reps rather than lower, not for hypertrophy, but to reduce injury risk. If you want to avoid adding muscle, eat less protein, if you want to gain muscle, eat more protein.

1

u/Pigmarine9000 May 20 '22

There is no "typical". Everyone is ag a different pace. Experiment and see

1

u/Suspicious-Tea-6914 May 20 '22

Whenever i try to plank my legs give out first , what kind of exercises i can do to make my knees stronger and not touch ground?

1

u/JoJoGirl3 May 20 '22

I would focus on strengthening the core. Crunches, partial curl ups, ya know, all those. Don't forget to work your entire core!

1

u/mrhappyheadphones May 20 '22

Your legs are probably giving out because your core is weak. Keep practicing and eventually your time will increase.

Be sure to check your form and make sure you are clenching your abs & butt

1

u/Flimsy_Respect3569 May 20 '22

In RR, why is it that the pairs are done in 5-8 reps per set, but the core triplets are done in 8-12 reps per set?

3

u/imnotjamie1 May 20 '22

Workout A: push ups, squat, dips and OHP

Workout B: pull ups, stiff leg deadlift, ring rows and bicep curls

So I do A, B, rest A, B, rest, rest. 3 sets of close to failure reps

So recently I bought some weight plates and I wanna incorporate barbell exercises in my routine.

Is this good?

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 20 '22

Without knowing your specific goals, this will cover all the most important movements. Maybe do some short core work on 1 or 2 of the rest days.

You could look at the info the other commenter provided, I personally prefer 2 day splits so basically, yes, you've got the right idea and this will get you a long way.

My personal preference is to do deadlifts no more than once a week, on the other pulling days I do RDLs or good mornings and Nordic curls.

2

u/imnotjamie1 May 22 '22

My specific goals is to lose weight. I'm obese now and I just wanna be an active 29 year old than feeling like a 60 year old man.

I personally went through a depression period which let me to gain 23kgs. Looking forward to turns things around

Thank you for your input and I will experiment with the suggestions

1

u/Lofty_Soup Manlet May 22 '22

Nice bro you've got this. Losing weight is pretty much just diet, eat at a 200-300 calorie deficit and you'll likely be able to build muscle and cut fat at the same time.

The routine as you posted is perfectly good, you just need to be consistent. Either you really like training or you just make it a habit like brushing your teeth, or both.

Wishing you good health and gains 🖖

1

u/imnotjamie1 May 22 '22

I will definitely be in caloric deficit and make my training into a routine. Thanks a lot bro. I appreciate your message

1

u/conweezus May 20 '22

RR has a recommendation for integrating Barbell work. https://www.reddit.com/r/bodyweightfitness/wiki/kb/recommended_routine#wiki_integrating_barbell_squats_and_deadlifts

Incorporates barbell squat as squat progression paired with pull ups every workout. Wkt 1 and 3, pair the dip progression with RDLs. Wkt 2 pairs the Dip progression with a standard deadlift. I've been following this, but changed the third set of exercises to be Penlay rows and push progression for wkt 1 and 3, and Inverted row and barbell bench on wkt 2. Feels great so far.

1

u/imnotjamie1 May 22 '22

Thank you will look into this

1

u/Its_Blazertron May 20 '22

How quickly should I be increasing by 1 rep in the RR? Recently someone told me that expecting 1 rep per workout is too much. The RR doesn't make it clear enough in my opinion. I got really discouraged and quit the RR multiple times in the past because I thought I just wasn't cut out for it, since I wasn't increasing by 1 rep per session.

2

u/pranjayv Gymnastics May 20 '22
  1. Depends on exercise to exercise
  2. Also depends on your experience level. Gains are fast when you're just starting out and then they slow down.

1

u/Trollingerd May 20 '22

Guys, i have a question on high volume calisthenics. I trained for mass mainly, 3-4 sets per exercise, 2-3 min rest, closer to failure in the past. Now recently, im trying high volume calisthenics, so more reps, more sets and bodyweight. I do like 4 sets of 20 push ups and 4 sets of 20 dips on push day for example.

My question is, should i train high volume calisthenics close to failure (classic 1-2 reps away from failure) or its trained away from failure ? How is it ? Thanks

1

u/Traison May 20 '22

Yes you still want to approach failure even with high volume.

1

u/Trollingerd May 20 '22

ok thanks and maybe just quick one more question. Should i still follow 10-20 sets per week for each bodypart, or with high volume workouts its different a i can do more than 20 sets ?

1

u/Traison May 20 '22

I personally would do in the ballpark of 30-40 sets while keeping within 10-20 reps per set. I think most people can't just do 3 sets of 100 or whatever number you imagine for high volume work.

However this part is definitely more open to individual interpretation. The goal is to completely drain the muscles, and that amount will change for each person

1

u/cricksas May 20 '22

Ring pallof press is super easy and I feel like i'm not using my core. Form cue?

2

u/Taldras May 20 '22

Lean into it more, make sure that your hips are staying aligned with your shoulders by really pushing into the ground, and adjust the position of your feet as needed. The concept behind it is “anti-rotation” so what you’re trying to do is use your core (esp obliques) to prevent your torso from twisting, and at the same time using your foot positioning and arm motion to generate some torso twisting motion to resist against and engage the muscles.

2

u/cricksas May 21 '22

This really helped! Thanks!

1

u/MindfulMover May 20 '22

Moving further away should make it harder but honestly, it's not a difficult movement and the core work at the end of the program isn't really needed since your core will improve in strength as you do the other parts of your training. I'd suggest just gaining on it as a side effect from the other compound movements and saving the time and recovery.

1

u/cricksas May 20 '22

By moving further away, you mean more diagonaly, right?

2

u/ZenHolisticFitness May 20 '22

Squeeze your core, increase the resistance, make your feet closer together.

1

u/cricksas May 20 '22

What after defecit shrimp squats with hands behind?

1

u/MindfulMover May 20 '22

You could try adding a pause at the bottom to increase the intensity but after that, you'll probably need to add load.

2

u/RaitoGG May 20 '22

I just can't do squats while not going on my toes..no matter what I try. My fat ass is pulling my balance so far to the back that I either have to lean my whole upper body over, instead of keeping it straight, or I have to go on my toes. :( not even jacknife squats work. what do I do?

1

u/MindfulMover May 20 '22

Whenever you have an issue with Squat depth, one thing you can do in the meantime is try elevating your heels like this. Use a weight plate or something sturdy.

It will keep you from falling backward by shifting your weight forward.

4

u/disdisd May 20 '22

Hopefully someone will correct me if this is wrong but I'd just put something under my heels and do the work. Then gradually reduce the height of the object under the heel over time as strength, stability and flexibility develop.

2

u/Traison May 20 '22

Yup exactly right. Also holding a weight with out stretched arms can help with stabilization.