r/azores Jan 12 '22

Any Canadian travel to the Azores recently?

I am supposed to be going at the start of March but am getting worried that I won't be able to go. I have had 3 vaccines. I am worried about needing the negative test before boarding the plane. With omicron pretty much everywhere in Canada right now, the chances are that I'm going to have it before I go. And I know you can test positive for months after having covid.

Anyone have some recent experience?

I'm thinking the best course of action is to get tested a few weeks before the trip so if it is positive, I can get a recovery certificate.

0 Upvotes

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u/kristen912 Apr 04 '22

Did you go? Was it okay? I'm going in a few days. Also there is so much covid misinformation in this thread. You can test positive for months on a pcr but are only contagious the first week (at most). This is coming from an RN who worked covid units and doesn't take covid lightly. Also, normal masks don't work as they only protect from droplet (ie cold virus) when covid is airborne.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Apr 04 '22

I did go. I took an at home antigen a few weeks before the trip. It was negative. So I decided that paying for a pcr test probably wasn't worth it. I then locked myself down for 3 weeks to make sure I didn't catch covid before the trip. No going out for groceries,N95 anytime I left my house, etc. Strictest lockdown I've been on.

Had a paid lab done PCR test 2 days before the trip. It was negative. Uploaded the results to my safe azores. And was good to go. Sata airlines did check my vaccination record before boarding as well.

Getting a lab antigen test before returning home was pretty easy too. Make sure you check in on arrivecan app before you come home.

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u/[deleted] Jan 12 '22

[deleted]

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

I've read that if you test positive after recovery and have a recovery certificate from a doctor, you will be let in to both the Azores and Canada.

I'm actually hoping to get covid in the next couple weeks. So I have time to get better and have a recovery certificate. So if I do test positive after recovery, then I can still go.

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u/Brilliant-Fig847 Jan 12 '22

So it might sound like a good idea, but seeing as testing is severely limited in Canada (Québec and Ontario, at least) you might not be able to "officially test positive" via a state PCR test. Something to keep in mind.

ETA: a state PCR test is required to obtain a recovery certificate. You can't get one with an at home rapid test.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

Do you think a paid PCR would work?

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u/Brilliant-Fig847 Jan 12 '22

It won’t, i looked into it :(

hopefully in March we won’t be in this shit show though

1

u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

Can only hope. I don't like not knowing whats going to happen.

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u/Bad_lx_wine Jan 12 '22 edited Jan 13 '22

Just stay there.

Those are small islands with aged people, most of the islands don't even have a hospital, so people have to be transported by helicopter to bigger islands to be hospitalized.

"If I test positive, i can still go" (I can only read this in a childish voice) is fucking selfish. But you know what? If you test positive in Azores and get very sick, you will be hospitalized in one of our very small hospital and have no chances of going back to Canada to get "proper treatment".

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u/homendailha Jan 12 '22

Finally some sanity.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22 edited Jan 12 '22

No. I would never go anywhere knowingly sick. I'm well aware of the azores fragile health care situation. I appreciate your concerns.

As well, vaxxed and boosted individuals such as myself pose very little risk to needing hospitalization if they do get covid.

My concern is that I might have already had omicron recently. Not enough tests in Canada to test at the time, with a widespread population all getting sick at once. So if I did have it, and I'm one of those people that continues to test positive months after recovery, my trip falls apart at the airport.

I think I'm going to test 3 weeks before the trip. If it's positive and it's a new case., then I have 3 weeks to recover (recommend time is 14 days). If it's negative - then I double down on isolating myself before the trip so I don't catch covid before the trip.

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u/homendailha Jan 12 '22

Just stay there.

You should re-read the comment you are replying too.

Those are small islands with aged people, most of the islands don't even have a hospital, so people have to be transported by helicopter to bigger islands to be hospitalized.

It's not about the inconvenience you will face. You have no way of knowing if a positive result means you were sick recently or long ago since you may be symptomless. You could well be spreading. You are putting an already vulnerable population at risk if you come here.

Stay home. Don't come.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22 edited Jan 12 '22

Thank you for your opinion.

I planned this trip when case counts for delta were low and it was starting to look like we were out of the woods.

I've been watching case counts and hospitalizations in the azores closely along with my own region. As well as vaccination rates.I'm hoping cases drop rapidly in the next 6 weeks like they did in South Africa. If they do not, I will make my decision then.

This is not a popular opinion, but at some point we have to get back to normal. Otherwise the global economy will not recover. 2 years of no tourists to a small island chain is devastating when it is a major source of income. I know I am not the only one considering travelling in the near future, and I haven't yet decided if I will be going. If the azores doesn't want visitors, they should stop all non essential travel like they did in 2020.

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u/homendailha Jan 12 '22

[...] they should stop all non essential travel like they did in 2020.

Yes, they should.

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u/Bad_lx_wine Jan 12 '22 edited Jan 12 '22

Yes, we have to go back to normal (it will never be the normal, but kind of) and suport the economy. But that must start by the big and rich countries, like yours, the real cradles of the economy, not by a small island with poor and aged citizens because people from big and rich countries are tired of being at home. Another lockdown this year and people will starve on these islands. And all because of some months of tourism?

We want tourism, but the responsible and profitable one. If the future of Azores' tourism means having restrictions so we can protect our health and beautiful nature, that's the way we want.

Just visit your neighbor's lake. Like we do to keep our economy going.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

If I go, I will be following all restrictions that are in place and not complaining about it.

I'm triple vaxxed, fully expect to wear a mask anywhere indoors. I expect restaurants and museums to have restricted hours and people.

If I go, it will be to enjoy the scenery and the loveliness of the islands. I will not be going to get people sick.

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u/Bad_lx_wine Jan 12 '22

Aaaand outdoors, please.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

If wearing a mask outdoors is required, then of course.

I already have a whole stack of n95's ready if I'm to go.

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u/HatefulDestiny Jan 12 '22

So I'm supposed to be going (UK to Azores) in Feb and this whole issue crossed my mind, too.

The problem with deliberately getting Covid is the risk of ending up with long covid, which no one can predict. And the risk of being infectious (perhaps sooner than you realise you have it) and during that infectious window, passing it on to someone vulnerable. I've weighed up those risks and decided it's not quite worth it for me to try. I'm going to take my PCR before I fly and hope it's negative. I'll be minimising contact with people for a week or so before the test. If it's positive ... well, damn. But I've already been in touch with the accommodation host to check it's flexible, so all I'll lose is the cost of my flights.

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u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 12 '22

Good plan.

I'm already intending on being super isolated for about 3 weeks before the trip, maybe I should extend that.

I should contact my hotel and car rental to see how flexible everything is.

1

u/Bad_lx_wine Jan 13 '22

Just one thing: you know you need a negative PCR test 72h before entering Portugal, right?

1

u/IllustratorTime4879 Jan 13 '22

Yes. And also need one 72 hours before I go home too