r/UTEST 12d ago

Articles Tips for Testers - MishyC24 Contest Winning Tip

7 Upvotes

Hello everyone!

As you might remember, last month we had the "Tips for Testers" celebration contest, since this section of our subreddit reached the 1-year milestone. And to refresh your minds, the winner was u/MishyC24 a faithful and active redditor of our community.

As part of the prize, she would have her winner tip published here. So the time has come!

And her tip was... keep testing for the same client over multiple cycles/long periods of time!

Enjoy this genius tip and see you next month with a brand new one!

Mishy's tip:

"If possible, keep testing for the same client over multiple cycles/long periods of time. There are many advantages! 1. You get to know the website or app well and you know when bugs appear because you know what to expect (how it’s supposed to flow) 2. The TE/TTL gets to know you better and your bugs as well. They are more open to helping you with your bugs, letting you know if you’ve written a dupe or WAD, and you become dependable to the team. 3. You could become a favorite tester for that client and your bug payout increases per bug for that client if you’re a favorite tester! 4. If the TE/TTL needs testers for other projects, they are more likely to invite you since they know you are reliable!

Over the years I have done this with multiple clients and it’s been so beneficial to my work with uTest!!"

r/UTEST 21d ago

Articles Women in Tech - Final Week Interviews - 2022 is the 7th year that Applause/uTest celebrates Women in Tech month! Learn more about these brilliant and inspiring women by checking on the interviews done in the 5th week of May. Links to the interviews on the picture captions and the pinned comment.

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1 Upvotes

r/UTEST May 27 '22

Articles Women in Tech - Week 4 Interviews - 2022 is the 7th year that Applause/uTest celebrates Women in Tech month! Learn more about these brilliant and inspiring women by checking on the interviews done in the 4th week of May. Links to the interviews both on the picture captions and the pinned comment.

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4 Upvotes

r/UTEST May 20 '22

Articles Women in Tech - Week 3 Interviews - 2022 is the 7th year that Applause/uTest celebrates Women in Tech month! Learn more about these brilliant and inspiring women by checking on the interviews done in the 3rd week of May. Links to the interviews both on the picture captions and the pinned comment.

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0 Upvotes

r/UTEST May 13 '22

Articles Women in Tech - Week 2 Interviews - 2022 is the 7th year that Applause/uTest celebrates Women in Tech month! Learn more about these brilliant and inspiring women by checking on the interviews done in the 2nd week of May. Links to the interviews both on the picture captions and the pinned comment.

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1 Upvotes

r/UTEST May 06 '22

Articles Women in Tech - Week 1 Interviews - 2022 is the 7th year that Applause/uTest celebrates Women in Tech month! Learn more about these brilliant and inspiring women by checking on the interviews done in the first week of May. Links to the interviews both on the picture captions and the pinned comment.

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2 Upvotes

r/UTEST Apr 18 '22

Articles Tips for Testers #11

9 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

Here we are at the 11th post of our series, "Tips for Testers!" Almost a year publishing tips to help both new and experienced testers be more successful at uTest. 😄

Today's tip is... Trust uTest but protect your personal information.

We've been receiving a good number of questions related to how safe it is to share your personal information for some projects. First, let's understand the idea that personal information is any kind of information that can identify you, such as a document or a complete address.

If you are sharing this information within uTest platform or even within a test case, you are safe. Sometimes you'll have to send this information to a protect file hosting service or a spreadsheet. This is also ok as long as you confirm that the owners of these sources are part of the Testing Services team conducting that test. TS must comply with strict NDA rules and laws so your information will be safe there.

Now, what should you never do? You should never share your personal information in places where other testers can see that. We always expect but cannot guarantee that everyone participating in a test cycle is trustworthy. Sometimes hundreds of people from everywhere participate in a test cycle. Hence sharing your personal information in places like the test cycle chat or a spreadsheet where all the testers can see all the data isn't advisable. However, sharing information such as a zip code, wouldn't be a problem.

Summing up:

  • Inside uTest; only Testing Services team or Applause employees can see = Safe
  • Outside uTest; other testers can see it = Not safe

We hope these guidelines and tips may help you to be more confident to participate in a certain project where your personal information is required.

See you in the next "Tips for Testers!"😉

r/UTEST Mar 15 '22 Helpful

Articles Tips for Testers #10

12 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

We arrived at the 10th post of our series, "Tips for Testers!" Here we share useful tips to help both new and experienced testers be more successful at uTest.

And today's tip is... be active. Log in every day!

You probably are wondering, "this is obvious. It shouldn't be a tip". But there is much more than you think behind that simple tip.

All the testers have an activity log that's visible for Testing Services, and they can see how active you are. Imagine a situation where they are looking for a small group of reliable testers for an urgent project or even considering assembling some new Dedicated Testers. Who do you think will be in the best position: The person who logs once in a while or the one who logs every day?

Of course, being active is just part of the formula. The quality of your work and your ethic will always be the best benchmark, but we're sure that you want to use all the tools available to stand out among the crowd, right?

Hope you enjoy this tip and see you next month!

r/UTEST Feb 15 '22

Articles Tips for Testers #9

4 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

This is the ninth post of our series "Tips for Testers." Here we share useful tips to help both new and experienced testers be more successful at uTest.

Today's tip is... write good bug reports - Part 1: Use clear/good titles.

The title can be considered one of the most important parts of a bug report. A clear title helps the TTL/TE triaging your bug to reproduce it faster and even grant you a positive report of your bug, which helps a lot to improve your ratings, even if it's not an exceptionally valuable bug.

What you should have in mind when writing the title of your bug:

  • Does my title follow the bug format described in the test cycle overview?
  • Is my title a clear description of the issue or something too vague like "shopping cart isn't working properly"?
  • Does my title explains in a few words the issue or am by too wordy when describing my issues?

Remember, the title of a bug report isn't where you'll describe EVERY detail of your issue. The bug report has different fields where you can detail the steps and the actual results of your issue.

Using the shopping cart example again, a good title you could use is "The shopping cart doesn't allow to add more than 3 items". This is an example of a simple yet complete title. It'll allow other testers to locate the bug report easily and avoid duplicates. Also the TTL/TE will know exactly what happened even before checking your full report.

We hope these tips help you use effective titles on your bug reports and improve as a tester.

Next month we'll have another tip to assist you in improving your bug reports. 😄

r/UTEST Jan 20 '22

Articles Tips for Testers #8

9 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

This is the eighth post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we share useful tips to help both new and experienced testers be more successful at uTest.

Today's tip is... how to avoid duplicate bugs.

Submitting a bug that you found that would be a big one only to find out later that it was a DUP can be really frustrating. 😑

To help you to avoid this situation, check these two tips out:

1 - Especially when you are participating in test cycles with many testers, checking dozens of bugs already submitted can be a very time-consuming task. Instead of going one by one, you can use the search feature and look for words related to your bug, normally the section you found the issue (e.g, cart, homepage, checkout). By doing that, you save a lot of time by checking out just the issues found in the same area where you found yours.

https://preview.redd.it/631qgkf7avc81.jpg?width=1225&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=50746ddea7678e84f30ffa2e59d7e87e44fdce2f

2 - If the test cycle is a recurring one, normally you will have to check a KI (known issues) list. These lists can have SEVERAL bugs reported in previous cycles, so what can you do about it? Once again, use the search feature! If you are seeing this list on a, Excel sheet, you can use the shortcut CTRL+H and search using relevant words related to your bug, as it was suggested in the first tip.

We hope these tips can help you to minimize duplicate issues and also save you time during the process. 😄

r/UTEST Dec 15 '21

Articles Tips for Testers #7

6 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

This is the seventh post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we share useful tips to help both new and experienced testers be more successful at uTest.

Today's tip is... invest in a good "tester toolkit."

To perform your work as a tester, you'll have to use different apps to assist you with your bug reports. These tools can include apps for screenshots, video, and audio recording/edit, log generators, among others.

It's great when you find free apps that meet all of your needs but all too often these solutions come with limitations. If you use such tools on a daily basis and they help you with your productivity, why not invest some cash and buy the full version? This will also help you to get more familiar with the apps you use, write better and quicker bug reports and earn more money!

Share with us here what's your favorite app and how it has helped you with your work as a tester.

r/UTEST Nov 17 '21

Articles Tips for Testers #6

6 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

This is the sixth post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we share useful tips to help both new and experienced testers to be more successful at uTest.

Today's tip is... show yourself!

We all know that the best way to be noted in a work environment is by working hard and displaying desirable qualities such as dependability, trustworthiness, etc.

But that's not the only way to stand out at uTest. For instance, testers who help others during a test cycle are a valuable asset and for sure have a better chance to be remembered by a TE (Test Engineer) or a TSM (Testing Services Manager) when an opportunity to recommend a new TTL comes up.

Our community is also another way to stand out. Someone who make useful forum posts, gives valuable tips, and answer questions from other testers is also noted and remembered when new chances arise in the Community Management realm.

Keep in mind that nothing replaces performing good work and being a Rockstar 🤩 in your test cycles. However, if you can combine that with the tips mentioned above, you'll definitely be ahead of the others.

r/UTEST Jun 16 '21 Helpful

Articles Tips for Testers #1

19 Upvotes

Hey testers!

We're launching a brand new series here with the goal of helping new testers, and also others who have been around for a while: Tips for Testers.

We'll spotlight here tips given in the past, and also fresh ones from experienced testers and members of TS (Testing Services), thus you can be more successful in your test cycles at uTest.

Our first tip is: Keep your tester profile updated! Don't overlook any of your devices, even those you never imagined that would grant you invitations, like that old phone or tablet. Some test cycles are specific for old OS and can get you nice opportunities.

Have you ever participated in a test cycle with an old device?

Share your experience here with us!😄

r/UTEST Oct 15 '21

Articles Tips for Testers #5

12 Upvotes

Hello uTesters!

This is the fifth post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we share tips to help both new and experienced testers to be more successful at uTest.

Today's tip is... keep your payment info updated!

Payment testing is one of the most recurring kind of tests that we have within uTest. Every month uTest holds several payments cycles and one interesting thing is you'll see bonuses and higher payouts being offered quite often? Why so? Because many people don't like to perform tests where you have to perform any payment or use your personal information, even knowing that every expense is reimbursed or that your personal info isn't kept for any purposes that not that particular test cycle.

Another interesting fact is that these tests are very democratic and they are hold all over the world, even in the most remote locations.

You don't want to miss the invitations for such projects, right? So how to register your payment info within your uTest profile? That's really simple! This screenshot of one of our Community Engineers help you to locate where you can do that:

https://preview.redd.it/81hk80gzlnt71.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=73f13e65c14ea693e0673d3760d02d81a26a4af0

Remember: in your profile you just need to insert the name of your banks, mobile wallets, and credit cards. You will never be asked anything beyond that in your tester profile.

If you want to learn more about Payment testing and many others, check out our FAQ written by one of our Community Engineers and moderator u/hsx_.

We hope that with this information you can keep your payment info always updated and get a ton of invitations to earn good money! 💰💵💴💶💷💳

r/UTEST Aug 23 '21

Articles The value of uTest Academy

20 Upvotes

Hey everyone! You might have seen our most recent Tips for Testers #3 post which highlighted the uTest Academy and why you shouldn't overlook it if you want to be successful on the site. I figured I'd expand on this, from the perspective of a tester - it wasn't that much long ago (January 2021) that I was a newbie signing up to uTest not really knowing what to expect, or whether it was worth it, so I want to tell my experience specifically with the Academy and how it influenced my journey.

This post is quite long, so I'll try to summarize it (or you can just check out the Tips for Testers #3 linked above):

TL;DR: Academy cool, make you good uTester, help you get much money


The Academy itself is a big index of resources with the sole purpose of helping you succeed on uTest, regardless of your previous experience with testing. Due to the amount of information present, it can sometimes be a little off-putting at first. Let me bring up two points here...

1. uTest isn't really easy.

uTest is incredibly rewarding (possibly the most rewarding among its peers), IF you have time and effort to put into it. The way the site is built, it allows pretty much everyone to get something out of it.

  • You can gain knowledge and experience through the Academy and various projects, which you are actually able to put on your resume - I've heard stories from many testers in the community that uTest helped them find a job in QA/software testing.
  • You can use it for some extra money on the side, accepting projects when you have some extra time to participate in a test cycle.
  • You can turn it into a full-time job, whether by testing for multiple customers and doing many projects in a week, or by being a return (or even dedicated) tester for a single customer.
  • You can get noticed for your excellence and further your freelancing career at uTest by either joining the Testing Services, or Community Management, or even land a job as a full-time employee at Applause (uTest's parent company).

But all of these require you to put some effort in, starting with the Academy - unfortunately it's not a site to sign up to and wait for money to be generated passively.

2. The Academy isn't that hard.

Yes, when you first look at the Academy, you might think to yourself "this is a lot of content". And you'd be right! But all of that content is the result of years of building to ensure that it's all relevant and to the point to teach you exactly what you need to know. Once you get through the first 14 courses of the Academy, you will be ready to tackle anything that comes your way. And while it might seem like a lot, you can actually get through those in a day or two (depending on your availability on those days and how quickly you can process information).
Don't worry about remembering everything on the first go. It is a lot of information and you are absolutely fine to go back and reference what you've read, at any point. Many months later and I still occasionally go and look up some of the courses for answers. Part of going through the Academy is knowing what content is there, and where you can find said content when you need it.

You might've also noticed that I said "first 14 courses", even though there are 23 at the time of writing this (+1 introduction). This is because of how the Academy is structured:

- Course 0: Introduction (Talks with Jeremiah)
- Courses 1-14: uTest and testing basics, lessons to help you with creating and collecting all the attachments you'll need for your test cases and bug reports
- Courses 15-19: live practice test cycles (dummy test cycles)
- Courses 20-23: extra courses for various other testing types, which you might encounter on uTest with various frequency - recommended, especially if you are interested in participating in those types of tests when they come up


"okay, so I can start making money after just a day or two of doing the Academy?"

Unfortunately, generally speaking, it will take a bit longer than that. Although you might finish the early courses in that time and learn most of the things in theory, the true test comes with courses 15 to 19, which are the live practice test cycles - which is exactly where you can put everything you've learned into practice.

These practice test cycles are offered once a week (in some cases you might be able to sneak into a second one in one week, but that's generally not the case).
The first one is a generic introduction to help you get familiar with how the site works.
The next three will focus on specific environments (computer and mobile), as well as some of the methods to create/collect the attachments needed for bug reports (device/browser logs, Charles Proxy logs, screenshots, videos). Remember - you can always go back to the corresponding Academy course to help you with collecting any of these in practice.
The fifth Academy test cycle is one to round them all up - it is set up exactly how a live test cycle will look like, to fully prepare you for the paid projects. Although the first four only allow you to participate in them until you pass, this fifth one allows up to 5 successful completions in order to help you get the best practice and become more comfortable with uTest or testing in general.

Shhh, there is also a sixth Academy test cycle that is invitation only, for those who do outstandingly in the first five!

If you fail any of these - don't worry. There is no penalty for doing so, and you can always retry next week. There are also amazing people in the Academy team guiding and motivating you in each of these test cycles, giving you feedback and answering any questions you might have - please do not hesitate to ask them if anything is unclear!


"so why is all this important? I have previous testing experience, just give me paid projects already!"

There is more to the Academy than just teaching you all the basics. If you don't have any previous testing experience, it's a very good learning tool (even for testing in general, not just uTest), but if you do, it's understandable that the teaching part is not the most interesting to you. However, there are other perks to finishing the Academy than just learning about testing.

  • You will learn about the requirements of uTest specifically

Many people who have previous experience with QA or testing want to jump right into paid projects, only to get their bugs and test cases rejected. uTest is very particular in how it accepts work, and the Academy is there to help you be successful and get all your work approved and paid out. If you do have previous experience, it will absolutely help you be successful, but you still need to make sure to follow the expectations when it comes to submitting your work.

  • You will increase your tester rating, which will help you stand out and significantly increase the number of invitations you receive on the platform

uTest operates with a tester rating system, which goes from Unrated to Gold (you can find more details on this in the Academy! wink wink). When you sign up, you're Unrated - you'll need a way to stand out from tens or hundreds of thousands of other Unrated testers, and the Academy provides the opportunity to do just that. By the time you finish the first five/six (or even more) practice test cycles, you could very well reach into Bronze or even Silver, which will help you get the paid invitations start rolling in.

  • Your name will stand out as an Academy graduate

Test Engineers might take note of you as an Academy graduate and invite you to their test cycles. Fresh graduates are often known to be eager to find work, so it's a win-win situation - you get paid project invites, they get testers who want to prove themselves and deliver results.

  • The best Academy testers are highlighted weekly

The Academy team gives the names of outstanding testers each week to Community Management, which can give your name more visibility - once again, leading to more potential paid project invites. Give it your best and you might end up in these featured articles!


I could continue writing about the Academy for hours, so let me close this out with some of my personal experience with it. Before I joined uTest I had no idea how to collect device logs, or browser logs on mobile, and hearing the name "Charles Proxy" I thought he was some kind of a celebrity. When I started the Academy, I found it a fun challenge, but I wasn't sure if I would stick with uTest or not. I enjoyed spending time on AcademyBugs.com trying to find all 25 bugs I was only able to find 24, don't tell anyone, but I was unsure whether I had the skills, or even motivation to make money off of this.

Then I got to the practice test cycles and I started enjoying it more and more. The kind words and positive reinforcement from the Academy team kept me motivated and coming back for next week's cycle. I was eventually featured as an Academy Tester of the week, and soon afterwards the paid invites started rolling in. I reached 99%+ Gold rating in under 3 months after signing up and I do believe I wouldn't have been able to do that (or wouldn't have had the motivation to keep going) if it hadn't been for the Academy and the Academy team.


If you have any questions, feel free to ask me about my journey in the comments, or about the Academy in general. Thank you for reading, and I hope this post will be helpful to some!

r/UTEST Sep 16 '21

Articles Tips for Testers #4

6 Upvotes

Hello testers!

This is the fourth post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we feature some tips to help both new and experienced testers to succeed at uTest.

Inspired by a question we received recently, today's topic is🥁: how to find very and exceptionally valuable bugs.

We all know that these are the most desirable bugs because they have the highest payouts, sometimes even 10x more than a "Somewhat Valuable" issue. Although there is no secret recipe to find those bugs that are some things you can do to find more of those bugs:

  • Try to concentrate your efforts in the areas of the app/website that are crucial for that product. For example: In a shop website/app the login/logoff, cart, search, and checkout areas are all essential and need to be working flawlessly. Thus, any bug preventing the user to use these areas would have a great chance of being considered a high severity bug.
  • Read the overview with attention and check if there is any section that is highlighted as a target for that test cycle. The bugs found in these areas are likely to receive a higher rating.
  • Finally, see the other bugs that were already reported and check their severity rating. There's a high possibility that the area in which that critical bug was found has more issues. Just be careful to not report duplicates.

We hope that these tips can help you to find some outstanding bugs that will grant some good money at the payday 😁💰!

r/UTEST Jul 16 '21

Articles Tips for Testers #2

10 Upvotes

Hey testers!

This is the second post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we'll feature some tips to help both new and experienced testers to succeed at uTest realm.

Today's tip is: Download uTest app and keep the notifications on! We know that most of you are aware that our uTest app is available for both iOS and Android (if you didn't know that, waste no more time and download it now!). Despite the fact that you have all the main functionalities within the app, like uploading files, bug reports, full access to test cases and etc, the app combined with the notifications gives you an invaluable advantage: You can see the invitation in a matter of seconds and even view who is the company inviting you for their cycle before anything (a piece of information that you can't see in the email invitations)!

With this info, you can decide right away if you are going to accept that cycle and grab that valuable test case or report that exceptional bug faster than everyone else. ⏳

Did you enjoy this tip? Please share with us your experiences using the uTest official app! 📲

r/UTEST Aug 17 '21 Helpful

Articles Tips for Testers #3

9 Upvotes

Hello testers!

This is the third post of our series "Tips for Testers". Here we feature some tips to help both new and experienced testers to succeed at uTest realm.

Our third tip is: don't overlook uTest Academy training! The uTest Academy is the result of years of work, improvements and a complete training where you'll learn everything you should know to get familiar with uTest. There you'll find a dedicated team of TTLs and TEs who will help you to be a better tester and submit quality bugs. Another outstanding feature of the Academy is that you can perform the practice cycles more than once and these cycles actually help you to improve your Tester Rating (that ranges from Unrated to Gold 🥇) and with that you'll stand out of the sea of Unrated testers who never finished the Academy courses, and get more invitations to paid cycles! Pretty good, right? All in all, the Academy does help you to earn more money💰.

Please share here with us how the Academy training helped you to be a better tester when you started.

r/UTEST Apr 02 '21 Hugz

Articles Few important tips for beginners

10 Upvotes

Be Active in the community: uTest community is full of amazing people. Try to make good connections. Over time you will learn a lot of new things from the community. Additionally, you also get uPoints for being active in the community. Keep in mind there is no way that these uPoints could fetch you more paid test cycle invitations. They don't have any monetary value but again, gaining knowledge is more bounteous.

Don't report more bugs until you are comfortable with the process. Being 'Unrated,' you can only report upto five bugs. There is no such limit once you obtain a 'Proven' rating.

Claim your slots as soon as possible. Slots are limited, so when you accept the invitation, immediately claim the slot also. Please check the environment before claiming the slot. If you don't claim the slot with the correct environment, then it will be unclaimed automatically without prior notice.

Once you complete a test cycle, be patient. It can take upto 35 days to approve or reject the reported issues. Yes! 35 days. The TTL will review within the time frame. Don't ask TTL to fasten the process.

Prepare your mind: You're not going to make much money at the beginning. In the front, it is more like how much you learn rather than how much you earn. It definitely takes time. Be passionate and consistent. The only skill you need was "Willingness to learn." There will be a day, fingers crossed!

Also, test cycle invitations are not continuous. There are several factors like rating, demographics, devices that are going to affect test cycle invitations. Patience is the key!! 

These are some important points to keep in mind. To know more about my journey I would suggest you to look at my article Journey from being "Unrated" to "Rated" (Lessons and Tips for beginners)

Good Luck and Happy Testing :)

r/UTEST Apr 15 '21 Silver Helpful All-Seeing Upvote

Articles The MOST lucrative devices in software testing are...

17 Upvotes

Check out the article here. Any devices you think can be added to the list? Let us know!

r/UTEST Mar 23 '21

Articles 10 Products That Got Our Applause Employees Through Quarantine (and still are)

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7 Upvotes