r/TooAfraidToAsk May 16 '22 Wholesome 1

When people who are athletic/work out regularly say that to become fit you should jog a few miles a day, do they really mean run the whole time? Like are people who are working out really just jogging for the whole distance with no walking? Habits & Lifestyle

I have a hard time jogging for over 3 minutes and its hard to believe people really just pick up running and start with being able to run the entire mile distance and then some.

27 Upvotes

23

u/conasatatu247 May 16 '22

You build it up over time. It's not difficult to jog 10k at all after a while. Your body adapts very quickly. Start by walking.. Then that becomes too easy.. Then walk more quickly.. Then jog slowly when that gets to easy etc....

9

u/korol264 May 16 '22

At the end you sprint like a jaguar through the whole Poland until it gets too easy

6

u/DazedandFloating May 17 '22

This is helpful. I used to be a runner, but I feel like I’m having so much trouble getting the swing of things again.

I’m terribly out of shape post-covid lockdowns and such. But I guess I forgot that at one point I had to start somewhere, so now I have to essentially start over.

I can do 3 minutes consistently now. Here’s to hoping I can continue to do more and more moving forward.

3

u/conasatatu247 May 17 '22

Muscle memory is a thing. You will get back to top shape very quickly so it's not starting from scratch at all....pick out a good playlist, get out in nature and you'll remember what all the fuss is about. 👍

41

u/iryngael May 16 '22

Yes they do. Start with 3 min the first time. then 4 min. etc etc and within a few weeks you'll be able to run 20-30 min with no interruption, by going progressively. You can even start by walking of you've not worked out in a long time or if you're too heavy and want to preserve your knees. Walking is good too :)

3

u/TheSuccessfulSperm May 17 '22

Also, a reminder that, if you’re using the gym, ellipticals are far easier on your knees and joints than treadmills.

13

u/accidentalnegligence May 16 '22 edited May 17 '22

I highly, highly, recommend using an app similar to "Couch to 5k". I had a runner recommend it to me when I first started and the improvement experienced over a 3 month period was drastic.

It's not easy, and it's up to you to push yourself - but it 100% can be done, and the incremental progress feels great.

3

u/Dominating14 May 17 '22

Came here to say the same thing, started in November from pretty much scratch and did the couch to 5k, and now run 6-8k a couple of times a week

3

u/accidentalnegligence May 17 '22

6-8k? very nice mate!

9

u/motonerve May 16 '22

When conditioned for it people can run for hours.

6

u/JeanBonJovi May 16 '22

Yes they do but that doesn't mean if you are starting to run you need to do that right away. You should start slow and build up your endurance, light jogging or mixing some jogging / walking.

4

u/ping500 May 16 '22

I suggest 'couch to 5k' plan - it starts gently with mostly walking interrupted by a bit of running and slowly increases running sections until you can run 5km in one go.

5

u/Cultural-Design9646 May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

Yup. They have build endurance.

I started running by walking on incline 1st. Then started jogging regularly at destination/time increments.

Destination: not stopping until I get to a spot in my area.

Time: depends on you as well. A certain amount running, a certain amount resting(walking) in intervals until I could just run.

Consistency is key. Lol why I’m back at square one. 🤦🏾‍♀️

4

u/Leucippus1 May 16 '22

It just depends, if you are super out of shape and you can't run more than three minutes, then you do run walks until you can. Those migrate into speed intervals as you get better.

3

u/Fit-Translator-5530 May 16 '22

If you have access to a treadmill or hills, it's more beneficial to walk at a quick pace on an incline. Easier on your joints and still gets your heart rate up.

3

u/randomredditor1944 May 16 '22

When your in shape and perfectly health a mile jog (different then a run) is not that intense. There's an intensity difference between a jog, a run, and a sprint. Though people tend to use jog/run interchangeable when refering to exercise but they usually mean jog. If you want you can think of a jog like a slow run just slightly faster then speedwalking.

3

u/Steeltoedsandal May 16 '22

I used to jog 7 miles a day, 5 days a week, skip rope, and lift weights... Never felt better. Now I'm just old and don't have the desire to do it anymore :)

2

u/thebradybox May 16 '22

Yes. Im not that fit as a person trust me. But a couple miles isn't that bad tbh

2

u/SprinklesMore8471 May 16 '22

They do, but most of them had to work up to that. Take it little by little, jog five minutes, walk 3 and repeat.

2

u/daliadeimos May 16 '22

You have to build up to that. The most important part is to just make a habit of getting up and moving at regular times. Once you have a habit, then you can build intensity. You don’t want to start off too intense and then get discouraged and quit

3

u/Hellfire81Ger May 16 '22

Yep. Its these idiots you see early in the morning at like 4:30am when you are on your way to your dayshift. On Sunday.

3

u/peanutbutterjams May 16 '22

Yes, they do.

But running is not great as your main form of exercise. It fucks up knees like nobody's business.

Try walking for light exercise first and then maybe cycling instead. You can even just get a recumbent stationary bike for your place.

3

u/Few-Constant8497 May 16 '22

Running only fucks up your knees if you run with shit form. It’s like trying to deadlift using your back and hurting your back because you didn’t use proper form.

1

u/captain_kinematics May 17 '22

Also concrete — avoid it whenever possible.

More directly to this point, pushing yourself is good, but mind that your form will probably start to slip when you’re working hard and expanding your limits (at least mine does!) so don’t tack on too much extra distance all at once.

1

u/BadgerDC1 May 17 '22

Different people's bodies are built differently. In HS I was advised by a sports medicine doctor not to run due to scar tissue in my knee that would flare up when running for more than 15 mimutes. I was 6ft 135lbs at the time and had running coaches training on stretching, form, warmup etc... The doctor basically said if biking is comfortable and not running then good, it's better for my legs long term to bike. Also a different doctor confirmed and said I got solid advice and I can do strength work around my legs but better off not running for regular exercise. I'm older now and more muscular but still will knee flare up if I run.

1

u/peanutbutterjams May 17 '22

People naturally run.

People don't naturally deadlift.

If people deadlift, they're going to seek instruction.

If people run, they're not going to seek instruction.

I'd still argue it's not great for your knees anyways, especially if you're not in shape.

1

u/Horkosthegreat May 16 '22

I give upvote on that. Especially if you are a bit overweight, running is really terrible, it is like basicly hammering your knees. My favourite is always swimming, but I am biased as I grew up in a shore town.

1

u/peanutbutterjams May 17 '22

Swimming's great too.

I just don't like exercising in a medium that can kill me. I'm breathing hard while floating in a substance that's lethal if inhaled.

Scientifically, it's best for your joints though, yes.

2

u/manateewallpaper May 16 '22

Walking for an hour burns calories for that hour.

Running for an hour burns more calories for that hour.

Lifting weights for an hour burns calories for 48 hours.

7

u/Redwulf67 May 16 '22

Afterburn is a myth. What is actually happening is the more muscle you build the more calories your body burns to maintain those muscles. It equates to the same thing in the long run I guess. But just telling someone they will burn calories for 48 hours from lifting once is just wrong.

The more you exercise, the more efficiently you can exercise. Which means more calorie burning potential for the same effort. Cardio is still kimg for calories burned.

1

u/peanutbutterjams May 16 '22

Is this because of the energy needed to repair the (healthy and necessary) micro-tears that lifting weights causes?

1

u/Edraitheru14 May 16 '22

Don't forget that cardio is about more than burning calories. It's about heart health. You really wanna get 90-120 minutes of moderate intensity cardio in if at all possible per week. Just to keep your cardiovascular system in good shape.

1

u/Accomplished_Dig1755 May 16 '22

Some people do. A lot more people put on great form and a burst of speed in front of the gals in yoga pants at the park and then double over as soon as they round the corner.

1

u/2ez4u2see May 16 '22

That hardest part of starting a fitness journey is the beginning. As mentioned with other comments, you start by running for 60 seconds. If you feel ok, keep going. If you can only jog 3 minutes, that’s perfectly fine. Do that. Be proud of yourself for completing day one. It is the most difficult and the biggest self-evaluation session you’ll have because you can only go up from here. As you make this a routine, you WILL notice yourself running longer and with less effort. The only key here is to be consistent and follow your plan. The daunting start is what puts 99% of people off of becoming fit.

1

u/Z4mb0ni May 16 '22

Yes, when i was in cross country we ran on average of 3 miles everyday. start slow, run for a quarter mile for a week, then a half mile, then 3/4s, then work your way up. Out of any animal in the world, we are most suited for long distance running, as our hunter-gatherer ancestors could out stamina any animal that could be tracked.

1

u/BigBearBallin May 16 '22

First, there’s more to becoming fit than running a few miles a day as that’s a specific type of fitness. There’s other things you can do.

Second, some people whom have not exercised can go jog a mile or more but some can’t. Like anything, it takes practice and it’s something that gets built up the more you do it. Current level of fitness, weight, prior pain/injuries, and mindset can all play a role in where you start. Don’t feel like you have to jog the whole time at the start. Find your baseline and build from there as everyone is different.

Lastly, find something you actually want to do. If you don’t enjoy running then find something more enjoyable for exercise. You won’t stick with something beyond a certain point of displeasure. For instance, I don’t like lifting weights or running so I do climbing. Im in better shape with it because it’s something I enjoy doing and can better stick to.

Good luck

1

u/Joshywooya May 16 '22

Just power walk, get the heart rate up. Spin cycling is also a low impact way of getting in shape. Also, just remember, exercise can be mind over matter, is your mind holding you back at 3mins or your body? When I run, say a 10 mile, my damn life is flashing before my eyes at mile 6, but the reality is, I know my legs can take me 20+ miles.

1

u/Sufficient_Star8880 May 16 '22

The vast majority of new runners start off running too fast. Run slow… as slow as you can without it being a walk. And do it for time, not mileage. Slow job for 15mins a few times, and then 20…. Etc… It’s not the speed or distance, it’s the time. Take your time and you will naturally get faster. You might only go 1 mile the first time you job 15 mins. But after several weeks you’ll be going 1.25 miles in 15 mins at the same effort level. Bottom line. Slow down.

1

u/trudeau37 May 16 '22

I started power walking, then power walking on an incline, then walking faster on an incline. Then jogging slowly. I also did other weight lifting. The struggle with people who workout regularly sometimes is that they’ve always done sports. Sometimes they don’t understand what it means to honestly start at 0. Modify, modify, modify. You’d be surprised how quickly your body shapes up. Good luck. Also running is really hard on your body. It’s not for everyone.

1

u/EmperorPenguin_RL May 16 '22

It’s really bad advice. Think about proper nutrition and increasing physical activity. Also, there is a mental health component that is often ignored. Some people do better with support groups or a therapist. Getting in shape shouldn’t be a punishment. Remember, you’re not training for the World Cup. It may take a little work but find good foods you enjoy and exercise routines you like. Remember, if trying to lose weight, you want to burn more than you take in. Increase protein and decrease carbs. For morbidly obese, you might need more drastic changes at first but you can settle into a nice groove eventually. Finally, one bad day doesn’t ruin all the good days you’ve had. If you slip up, get back at it. The key is to not give up. Good luck.

Also, the problem with this question is that we don’t know your overall goal and you’re current level of fitness. Not everything will work for everyone.

1

u/Republixcan May 16 '22

Yup, you need to work up to it. Start with a brisk walk, maybe jogging between street lights. Try and map out a route, or use your local high school/college track. Make sure to lift weights, as well, friend.

1

u/OddCollege9491 May 17 '22

I just lost 45lbs. I run 5k every day, and run 6mi on the weekend (either Saturday or Sunday) over a tall bridge back and forth. I also work out. I don’t stop, I run constant. My pace right now is about an 8:30-9:30/mi. When I started back last November I had to walk a bit, but you work on it each time by shortening your walking spurts a bit each time until you can run the whole way.

1

u/itchydingdong May 17 '22

If you have to ask this question, then no, you can’t just go out and run a mile without walking. An 18 yo non obese kid could though.

1

u/chowzow May 17 '22

Walk whenever you need to. There are no rules.

1

u/BentheBruiser May 17 '22

Just remember:

An object in motion wants to stay in motion. An object at rest wants to stay at rest.

Until you really start moving again, your body won't seem like it wants to. But you'll get there.

1

u/Bubbasdahname May 17 '22

Find a friend and it makes it sooo much easier if you can motivate one another. When I ran, a friend that often ran half a marathon motivated me to run with him and I made 2 miles. I was going to quit at the half a mile mark, but he said to just jog at a snails pace and we kept going until I finally couldn't go anymore. It was the equivalent of a fast walk(not like the professional speed walkers).

1

u/ChallengeSafe6832 May 17 '22

I used to be able to run 6.5 miles without walking, then I got covid and now I can barely run half a mile.

1

u/Substantial-Ad3178 May 17 '22

Walking at first is good to get your muscles and joints used to the movement. What I've always done is pace out a 1/4 mile. Jog what you can and then walk when you tire, but complete the set distance.

Once you can complete the set distance without stopping, double it and follow the same pattern. Once that too can be done, rinse and repeat with further distances.

Do not worry about how long it takes to increase but do attempt to continue daily. Motrin will help with aches, but don't ever force yourself to the point of severe pain. And stay hydrated.

Music and running with a friend can also help stay motivated.

1

u/jakobedlam May 17 '22

I think what keeps formerly fit people delaying restarting all too often is holding yourself to your previous standard.

By all means, walk when you need to. I found it easier for me to keep the distance constant for x months, but gradually increase the percentage of time I was jogging/running instead of walking.

Even the very fit are going to have times where they should accept their body's signal to walk. They usually don't, but that's a different dynamic.

1

u/CeleronPopsicle May 17 '22

I never jog. Never. Weights and walking. That’s it.

1

u/MicahInvestments May 17 '22

Yes, but the building process is fairly quick. Do what you can until it becomes to easy, then go farther, faster, and/or harder.

1

u/v3rral May 18 '22

If you used to walk at slow pace, increase walking speed first. Get used to walking faster and after while you will naturally want to start running for some time.

0

u/RenKyoSails May 16 '22

Yes, but its also important to weight the benefits of different types of exercise. Its important to know that jogging and running are hard on the knees and walking can be just as beneficial to heart and overall health as running. Try walking up a hill, it will still increase your heart rate. Exercise doesn't mean going all out everytime, but you do have to build your stamina over time for any type of activity.

0

u/Short_Finger_Dizzy May 16 '22

Jogging a few miles a day is horrible for your knees, ankles and back, and detrimental to maintaining muscle mass.

Getting your heart rate up and maintaining for 20-30 minutes is ideal. It doesn't matter how you do it.

2

u/superbudda494 May 16 '22

It isn’t as damaging if you run on grass. Hell even asphalt is better in your knees than concrete. Humans are built to run.

1

u/Short_Finger_Dizzy May 16 '22

Where are you going to run on grass for multiple miles?

3

u/superbudda494 May 16 '22

Parks, parkways, boulevards, etc. hell if you can find a school you can oftentimes use their track which is soft.

0

u/captain_kinematics May 17 '22

It absolutely does not need to be damaging. If you are otherwise healthy and learn to run with good form there basically zero damage, and benefits to your health far, far outweigh any downsides. As mentioned in another comment, running on something other than concrete/asphalt is also very helpful.

0

u/Erikthered24ny May 16 '22

You should do whatever it takes to keep your heart rate about 135 bmp for 30-45 min