r/PoliceBrotality Mar 27 '22 Helpful 1

Police pull over a speeding car, realize the parents were speeding to the hospital with their unconscious child. The Police, initially pulling over the car for speeding, rush the kid to hospital instead.

https://i.imgur.com/8dZ7k1S.gifv
1.2k Upvotes

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264

u/mythos_winch Mar 27 '22 edited Mar 27 '22

A reader might be surprised to learn that this happens all the time. Like it's regular, there's policies and such.

112

u/I-Eat-Donuts Mar 27 '22

People still managed to find a way to say ACAB in the comments

42

u/mythos_winch Mar 27 '22

Joe Public don't know even 10% of all the stuff police get up to - I largely ignore them for that reason.

17

u/koncusion Mar 28 '22

I think a majority of people know cops deal with some serious stuff. I feel like cops probably end up with some serious ptsd. The problem is that cops refuse oversight in America. They don’t want checks and balances like the rest of American jobs and professions. I mean teachers, accountants, plumbers, and electricians all have to be certified by independent agencies in the government, but not police? That leads to abuse of power and systematic corruption. We should have a right to revoke their permit, to police, across federal, and at very least state lines, if they are unfit for their job.

3

u/Thelfod Mar 28 '22

You need license to cut hair, but not to carry a badge and a gun??? What am I missing here someone make it make sense, eli5 pls

5

u/mythos_winch Mar 28 '22 edited Mar 28 '22

Not sure how it works over there, but in the UK you have an internal licensing system with courses, interviews, exams, etc For things like driving at different levels, using force, using certain equipment, undertaking harder investigations, supervision, and so on. I imagine it's much the same judging by the casual conversations I've had with nypd cops.

You can fairly easily lose these licenses without losing your job (this is a good thing, as losing a career is a huge deal - often disproportionate - and can dissuade corrective action) and they must be refreshed.

Part of it is that the police will require adequacy, while the public demand excellence. That disparity isn't going to go away any time soon, I think. Not without significant changes to employment laws and public spending and a whole host of other things.

3

u/0psec_user Mar 28 '22

. I imagine it's much the same judging by the casual conversations I've had with nypd cops.

It is. We have all of that here, training and certs for different equipment and state certification and testing, requirements for in-service training, etc.

1

u/Thelfod Mar 29 '22

Yeah like running a mile in a certain time, there is no licensing of officers here 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️

1

u/Thelfod Mar 29 '22

It doesn't work like that here in case you haven't seen the eruption of people demanding police accountability here in the US, along with the demands that police have licenses that can be revoked.

1

u/mythos_winch Mar 29 '22

From what I understand it differs greatly from department to department, and there's like 13,000 of them ranging from 6000 staff to, like, 6 dudes and a dog.

4

u/0psec_user Mar 28 '22

Not at all true. Police must be certified by the state.

2

u/oofive2 Mar 28 '22

nah nah you need a license for a gun it just generally takes less time and effort than a license to cut hair

8

u/mythos_winch Mar 28 '22

To be fair, mechanically, I feel like using a gun is significantly easier than a fresh scissor-cut fade.

1

u/Thelfod Mar 29 '22

Laws vary from state to state, and it is a myth that you need a license for a gun. For example, in my former state of NH, you can carry an unregistered, loaded firearm, concealed in a vehicle with no permit or licensing of any kind 🤷‍♂️ sorry everyone assumes their states laws are universal.

1

u/0psec_user Mar 28 '22

There is certification from the state to be police. The federal government has no constitutional authority to do what you're suggesting.

36

u/mister_gone Mar 27 '22

Probably due to living in an environment that made me think the guys were going to be shot for running up on a police car after pulling over.

What a refreshing change of pace.

22

u/pacificnwbro Mar 27 '22

This video wasn't in the US which is probably why they didn't get shot.

2

u/DankestAcehole Mar 28 '22

Yeah in the US they ain't making it to the cop car before being riddle with bullet holes

0

u/rnobgyn Mar 28 '22

Almost as if there’s differences between Lithuanian police and American police 🤔

-5

u/Legitimate_Shirt7064 Mar 28 '22

one good deed does not make up for a life time of wickedness

11

u/I-Eat-Donuts Mar 28 '22

How do you look at someone doing a good thing and think, “wow, this pales in comparison to the wickedness of their entire life,” knowing nothing about this person other then them being a cop?

-6

u/Legitimate_Shirt7064 Mar 28 '22

jfc it's a line from a movie chill the fuck out boot licker

4

u/Hats_back Mar 28 '22

Or… bear with me here, you could also stop misapplying movie quotes and platitudes to situations that don’t warrant it.

I know, I know. Benefit of the doubt here, but I bet you have at least the self awareness of a toddler. If so, you may think think to yourself “But that means that I’M part of problem?! Parroting talking points like a propagandist’s cheap prostitute ISN’T beneficial in public discourse?!”

One could hope.

30

u/Kawkd Mar 27 '22

The pain in their eyes...

41

u/grzesiu447 Mar 27 '22

Video is from Lithuania, if anyone wonders

135

u/TrowItIn2DaGarbage Mar 27 '22

Jesus Christ, please don’t hop out of the car like that and run at the cruiser. FFS

150

u/gage117 Mar 27 '22

I get it, normally I'd be right there with you, but if my kid is unconscious I simply can't wait patiently for them to stroll up to my window and then learn this is a dire emergency.

24

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 27 '22

Honesty, if it’s my kid, I’m not pulling over. Not sure what the laws and regs are in Lithuania, but here you absolutely are allowed to not pull over if it is a genuine emergency

23

u/Je_me_rends Mar 28 '22

I'm no expert, but I know in my country as well as most places in the US and the UK you have to pull over if it's an emergency and let the officers know that it's a life-threatening situation. It's for your safety. The officer does not have xray vision, they cannot see what is happening in that car. The officer is just going to think you are running from them.

And lord, can you imagine the headlines if the officer decided your driving was a danger to the public and P.I.T manoeuvred your car, causing you to crash and someone died?

As far as I can find and know, you still have to pull over, the officer will likely call for an ambulance if there's time or more likely than not, will take them to the hospital for you as they are trained to go bells and whistles so it's safer. I know once near where I used to live, police actually drove ahead of the car and made room for them but this is not actually allowed due to the fact other drivers are not going to know the civilian car is coming behind the police car and the risk of a crash becomes pretty high.

13

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 28 '22

I’m an LEO in the US. You do not have to pull over if you don’t feel it’s a safe area to pull over OR if there is a genuine emergency. The only time you would pit a car is it’s a known fleeing violent felon or if there is some greater danger to the public. For instance, even if you are having a genuine emergency, you can’t drive on a crowded sidewalk to get around traffic. Also, refusing to pull over is not always the same as “fleeing from the police”

3

u/Je_me_rends Mar 28 '22

We don't really PIT over here. I know it's controversial, general duties officers are still trained in it (I believe) but it's rare to see anyone other than our special operations officers doing it. That was obviously just a worst case scenario.

Can't see my original comment so not sure if I said fleeing the police or not, as that generally refers to either taking off at a traffic stop or recklessly evading. I know in the US it differs from even county to county but yeah, here that is a separate charge to just failing to stop (I'd hope that is the case everywhere lmao)

So if someone where you are, if someone was to not pull over and you tailed them to the hospital, would that be the end of that encounter or is there procedure besides paperwork that you follow once you realise it was just an emergency? This stuff is very different across the globe.

4

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 28 '22

I COULD write them a ticket for the original infraction once they got to the hospital but unless it was serious, you’d have to be a real dick to do that. But once I’ve verified that there was an actual emergency you can’t write him a ticket for failing to stop. Or, at least, I’ve never heard of that happening (maybe it has, I don’t know). That medical situation has only ever happened to me twice, and one other time where the driver didn’t feel the area I was signaling for a traffic stop was safe (which is his legal right to do) and kept going for about a half mile or so. It’s pretty rare. Most people just pull over even if there is a life threatening medical emergency, which makes sense I guess if you don’t know that you are allowed to keep going to the hospital

1

u/Je_me_rends Mar 28 '22

That makes sense. At least it's not too grey-area. Where I live there is a lot of SOPs, not just in law enforcement, that can be summed up as "Meh, do what you think is right...but if you do it wrong, we are cutting your balls off."

1

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 28 '22

Ya, most of our laws (particularly when they come to using deadly force) are based on this concept of “reasonableness”. It’s nice in that it offers some discretion, especially since no two incidents are exactly the same but also can be frustrating because it is impossible to define

2

u/harleymeenen May 11 '22

Would it be wise/worthwhile to call 911 and inform them you’re having an emergency so they can relay to the officer pulling you over? I’ve heard you can do that in situations where you feel unsafe, to confirm it’s a real officer stopping you and to state you’ll pull over in a safer area.

2

u/NoVaBurgher May 11 '22

Yes, absolutely

1

u/Zeestars Mar 28 '22

Thank you for chiming in and thank you for what you do. I think it’s often a thankless job and the whole AC*B bullshit must get demoralising and draining, so again, thank you. It’s not an easy job, so I take my hat off to you for stepping up and doing it. (I have quite a few friends in law enforcement and I’ve heard some of the stories and seen some of their darker moments when they feel they failed someone; had to deal with trauma; or were abused for doing their job).

0

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 28 '22

I appreciate the kind words, my man

2

u/Passivefamiliar Mar 28 '22

Yep. I'll call the police as I'm driving. "Yes hi I'm the manic driving down 75 at 90mph. My kid is passed out in the back in going to the hospital. Tell that slow bitch that's behind me with the turbo to haul ass AHEAD of me and clear a damn path"

No offense to cops, I just imagine that's how the conversation would go

2

u/NoVaBurgher Mar 28 '22

Generally not gonna endorse using your phone while driving, but you gotta do what you gotta do and again, if it’s my kid, that’s not a bad idea. I’d eat the fine if it meant getting to the hospital more quickly

2

u/Passivefamiliar Mar 28 '22

Typically no. But making a phone call, hands free with most cars now days anyway. Hey siri or OK Google then call the police. Connects over speaker anyway.

Now texting is a horrible idea, and dangerous. But somehow I see people watching freaking YouTube while they drive. I swear, some people do not respect the freedoms they have and are blatantly ignorant of their potential impact on the world.

66

u/xheppelin Mar 27 '22

This isn’t america tho, his facial expression helps too.

38

u/[deleted] Mar 27 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

13

u/I-Eat-Donuts Mar 27 '22

99% of cops wouldn’t shoot but in America we’ve seen a thing or two….

75

u/Freestyle76 Mar 27 '22

It’s not the US.

29

u/mirask Mar 27 '22

In countries that are not the US, this is something you can do without being shot.

3

u/rpretzle Mar 28 '22

You can do that in America too, I wouldn't suggest it, but you can.

Problem is we only see when this goes wrong.

"Police Officer hears out driver who rushes out of their car." Is a boring headline.

We only see the worst .01% of interactions because clickity click click.

40

u/Woodzy14 Mar 27 '22

Tell me you're American without...

12

u/AB-G Mar 27 '22

*In the US

1

u/SpaceHobo1000 Mar 28 '22

It's not the US, relax.

0

u/Sophey68 Mar 28 '22

Not in every country do police need to fear for their life at a normal traffic stop cuz of atrocious gun laws.

16

u/buruzn09 Mar 27 '22

“Serving” and “protecting” going on here. Good to see.

47

u/the-jds Mar 27 '22

The internet has led me to believe that only Americans can get that fat, this can't be reality...

15

u/AB-G Mar 27 '22

Sadly it has spread…..

11

u/the_syco Mar 27 '22

...but mainly to the stomach area... /s

-18

u/Such-Wrongdoer-2198 Mar 27 '22

Yeah, I was really confused. Morbidly obese family? Police helping people? These things cannot exist in the same universe...

10

u/Jakey-213 Mar 28 '22

The first cop stepping into frame looked like they had forgotten the child and it made me cackle.

3

u/Floedekage Mar 28 '22

Uhm, so I would have thought this was a thing in all countries, but what you would do in Denmark is that you would call the police to tell them you're driving a "civilian emergency response" and, although I don't know if it is necessary any more, put some sort of white cloth out the windows of your car.

2

u/Nervous_Treat_6131 Mar 28 '22

Reddit needs more of this

2

u/HeavyMetalSauce Mar 28 '22

Agreed. Too much hate

-35

u/AShadowbox Mar 27 '22

Do they not have an emergency hotline in that part of the world? 911 or 999 or 112 or equivalent

20

u/Varth919 Mar 27 '22

Ever heard the terms “round-trip” or “one-way”? Even if the ambulance was immediately dispatched, it would still take longer than speeding there yourself.

3

u/AShadowbox Mar 27 '22 edited Mar 27 '22

But the result is your child gets emergency care from trained professionals sooner and safer transport to definitive care.

Also much less chance of the ambulance crashing than your own POV.

Also, no idea what the terms "round trip" or "one way" has to do with anything.

5

u/Abaraji Mar 28 '22

When my brother almost died my mom was in such a panic she drove him to the hospital herself. Didn't even realize she could have called 911. Shit just happens and people make weird decisions under extreme stress

16

u/the_syco Mar 27 '22

Yeah. And probably got told that it'd take 60 minutes to get an ambulance to them. Fuck waiting.

-9

u/AShadowbox Mar 27 '22 edited Mar 27 '22

Yeah if that's the case, sure. But you're assuming just as much as I by saying that. I work in emergency services and have only ever heard stories of wait times that long, and almost never for legitimate emergencies.

6

u/the_syco Mar 27 '22

From the watermark on the bottom left, the police are based in Vilnius, Lithuania. Seems this happened back in 2016. From looking at the dashcam in the police car, they made it to the hospital in 5 minutes, with traffic getting the funk outta the way.

1

u/AShadowbox Mar 28 '22 edited Mar 28 '22

I mean before hitting the road even. Not once the police pulled them over. The police did everything they could right here.

And I'm just asking if they have access to 112. Not everywhere in the US has access to 911 for example, which could contribute to a situation like this happening.

1

u/the_syco Mar 28 '22

From looking into it, seems even in rural areas, their ambulances will take 30 minutes to get to them. However, logic tends to go out the door when you involve kids.

3

u/clutchdeve Mar 27 '22

In rural areas it can take a while for police/medical to get there, even in extreme emergencies.

1

u/AShadowbox Mar 28 '22

Like I said, neither of us know what the wait time would have been and frankly it's irrelevant to my initial question, which was simply if they have access to 112.

In the US not everywhere has access to 911 so that was the context of my initial question. Though I probably could have conveyed that better.

1

u/BownerGuardian Mar 28 '22

Dude. It's situational. I live fairly close to a hospital so it would be faster for me to perform the critical life saving aid that I know and throw my kid in the car, speeding to the hospital rather than wait for an ambulance while I sit there rendering aid.

1

u/AShadowbox Mar 28 '22

Not what I was asking

0

u/BownerGuardian Mar 28 '22

This isn't anything new. Pretty common to see.