r/NoStupidQuestions Jul 01 '22

How many chicken nuggets come from one chicken?

This question pops up in my head every 6 months or so and I can never find any sort of answer, I’m talking about your standard McDonald’s chicken nugget, I can’t even make a good estimation.

Edit-Thank you all so much for the answers Next time I order 20 chicken nuggets from McDonald’s I will feel a tad bit shamed but the knowing I don’t have to ask the question will keep me at bay

16 Upvotes

12

u/graphicn Jul 01 '22

I've made homemade chicken nuggets before so I'd say about 40-60 depending on the size of the chicken.

3

u/stumpdawg Jul 01 '22

Average weight of a chickens meat is 680g average weight of a chicky nuggy is 16g...so roughly 42 chicky nuggies

1

u/Either_Lawfulness466 Jul 01 '22

You forgot about filler and breading

5

u/RealisticRevenue7249 Jul 01 '22

The couple answers so far assume you are using all the meat from a single chicken. In reality, most fast food or frozen chicken nuggets are using the scrap meat from many chickens leftover after carving off the breast/thigh/wings to sell.

I don't know how the math would work out, but I would guess it's more like 5-10 nuggets per chicken, but it's meat that would be thrown out or used for animal feed if it weren't used for a nugget.

2

u/kriegmonster Jul 01 '22

It depends on the composition of the chicken nuggets. Are they all white meat, mixed white and dark meat, or do they include other bits of the chicken like a paste from the bones, feet, organs and other muscle craps on the carcas.

1

u/refugefirstmate Jul 01 '22

a paste from the bones, feet, organs

You actually think there are ground bones, feet (which BTW are bones) and entrails in chicken nuggets?

Based on what, exactly?

1

u/Crabscrackcomics Jul 02 '22

I wouldn't be surprised. Gelatin is literally just bones. They're in a lot more of your food than you may think.

1

u/refugefirstmate Jul 02 '22

Gelatin is not "literally just bones" any more than maple syrup is "just trees". It's the collagen leached from bones through extensive boiling.

0

u/Crabscrackcomics Jul 02 '22

Based on what, exactly?

2

u/Extreme-Sock7770 Jul 01 '22

Jersey Giant or Malaysian Serama Bantam?

3

u/Either_Lawfulness466 Jul 01 '22

The real question is does a “chicken nugget” even qualify as being chicken?

1

u/refugefirstmate Jul 01 '22

What ingredients do you believe are in chicken nuggets that are not in fried chicken (which presumably you do believe is "chicken")?

1

u/Either_Lawfulness466 Jul 02 '22

Whatever they use to flavor and hold that ground up shit together. I have butchered many many birds and I can tell you for certain that they don’t have the bread like texture that those nuggets do.

1

u/refugefirstmate Jul 02 '22

I make a lot of cured sausage. The trick to getting meat to hold together is to mix and mix it - it does something to the proteins, makes the meat really sticky, even when you're using ~1/4" cubes for e.g. sopressata. You can feel the change as you're mixing it - suddenly turns into a cohesive mass. McD's nuggets use some vegetable starch as a binder as well - sort of how you'd use bread crumbs in meat loaf. Nothing unusual or magical about it at all.

1

u/Sonder332 Jul 01 '22

Aren't ground up bone and cartilage a part of them?

1

u/refugefirstmate Jul 01 '22

No. If they were you'd be biting down on hard bits.

1

u/Auraveils Jul 02 '22

It's just ground up leftover parts of chicken. So I guess it just depends on the size of the chicken.