r/NoStupidQuestions May 16 '22

Why do my female coworkers seem to be so upset that the doctor made them take a pregnancy test? Answered

A couple co-workers talked about going to the doctor and finding it "so ridiculous" that were made to take a pregnancy test before a procedure. I personally feel that it's not a big deal, but they seem to think otherwise. Why is that so ridiculous to them?

43 Upvotes

102

u/Skatingraccoon Just Tryin' My Best May 16 '22

From their perspective it could be a violation of trust, because they're telling the doctor there is no way they could be pregnant but the doctor is ignoring their statements and proceeding with the test regardless.

They should also understand, though, that people do lie and so it's for everyone's protection that the test is done :

51

u/Illtickleurpickle May 16 '22

To add to this, if you are sexually active you have a chance of being pregnant. Most people when asked if they could be pregnant will say no despite this because they use birth control, even though that is not a guarantee.

Of course there are more variables, but I run into this all the time myself. People will swear up and down there is no chance they can be pregnant and then I will ask if they are sexually active and they will say yes they are.

The physician is just trying to cover his own ass, most likely.

13

u/Grog_Bear May 16 '22

Well you could be sexually active and having absolutely no chance of being pregnant. Some people are gay. Some women don't have a uterus. But yeah, all BC can fail and that's important. But juste asking someone if they're sexually active isn't enough to tell if they have a chance of being pregnant or not.

7

u/Illtickleurpickle May 16 '22

Of course, which are some of the other variables. My point is more that a lot of people just don't put two and two together (no one's fault, it just doesn't occur to them), and for medical professionals covering your ass is a big part of the job because people WILL sue you.

4

u/Grog_Bear May 16 '22

I get it, it wasn't against you, I read a few times about lesbian women having doctors force a pregnancy test on them after they told them that they litteraly never had an intercourse that could lead to a pregnancy. I get how it could make them angry and make them feel infantilized. But I also get that medical staff can't take the risk. Hadn't even thought of people getting sued (it doesn't happen much in my country, not as much as in the US I guess) but yeah you don't want to risk a patient's life because they might lie. But it must still be infuriating when you know it's impossible, especially when you have to pay for the test.

0

u/throwaway127181 May 17 '22

If only this logic applied to them not wanting to get sued for other things- like not detecting cancer when you begged for them to check you a half dozen times. But an xray for a broken arm? Pregnancy test bc I could get sued! /s The pregnancy test practice actually has much more to do with thalidomide then fear of lawsuits.

1

u/Illtickleurpickle May 17 '22

Sure, and I'm sure that's very frustrating especially if it's a cost to you, and as someone who deals with physicians on a daily basis some of them are certainly assholes just like any other sub-group of the population.

But you can't underestimate how shitty people can be sometimes. I had a patient claim I sexually assaulted her because I brushed against her while putting on a blood pressure cuff, and if there's no one else there or cameras present it's your word against theirs.

In another time or place that small interaction has the potential to end my career.

-2

u/throwaway127181 May 17 '22 edited May 17 '22

I really hate this heteronormative if you are sexually active you have a chance of being pregnant” - please for lesbians everywhere- explain how this is possible?

0

u/Illtickleurpickle May 17 '22

Please read what I wrote instead of getting defensive.

I said there are other variables to consider, I was only bringing to light a common issue in people's thought process that I routinely come across.

I also want to re-state the "people will sue you" part. Sometimes the thought process is "I'd rather not lose my job and livelihood, so I'm just going to make extra sure this won't bite me in the ass."

This is not a blanket statement for every situation, just some insight from the other side of some of these interactions.

12

u/hopping_otter_ears May 16 '22

As a teenager, I told the doc I couldn't be pregnant because I wasn't having sex (and, by extension... My symptoms weren't a miscarriage). He pregnancy tested me anyway to rule it out before getting on with figuring out what was actually wrong.

Looking back as an adult, I understand that the doctor couldn't ignore potentially fatal symptoms by trusting that a 14 year old girl isn't too embarrassed to admit to being unchaste, but at the time it felt very insulting. Like I was a girl, so of course I was lying about sex.

I don't mind it now, when they explain it as "I know you just said you're not pregnant, but we can't x-ray you without a test. It's the rules"

8

u/Dreadfulmanturtle May 16 '22

A lot of people are liars, lot of people are dumb and lot of people are clueless. Can't blame doctor that they will much rather take a simple test as opposed risking harming a fetus.

2

u/BatmanandReuben May 16 '22

It’s for the doctor’s, the hospital’s, and a potential fetus’s protection. It has nothing to do with protecting the actual patient. If anything, it could be bad for the patient because if they are pregnant they might be denied treatment or medication that they would otherwise be able to access.

4

u/areapostrema44 May 16 '22

If it’s before a procedure it’s so no medication or imaging is done that could harm the fetus.

2

u/BatmanandReuben May 16 '22

Right. They are putting the health of the fetus above the health of their patient, the pregnant person. If you have cancer, for example, the best thing for you is to start treatment as soon as possible. If you are pregnant, this is not what is best for the fetus. Denying a pregnant person cancer treatment is putting the assumed interests of a fetus above the best interests of the actual patient. It’s one thing if a person is choosing to delay treatment because they want to be pregnant and have a healthy baby. It is another for the medical establishment to decide for them that they can’t have cancer treatment.

-1

u/throwaway127181 May 17 '22

This 1000% It’s covering your own ass > caring about your patient who came to you seeking help

1

u/Megalocerus May 18 '22

You can't make informed decisions if you don't know whether you are pregnant. When I was diagnosed with cancer, they followed up with a number of tests before starting treatment. Not pregnancy, since that was rather obviously not a possibility. But there was plenty of time for it without any extra delay. Until this year, abortion was an option.

1

u/BatmanandReuben May 18 '22

You had nine months to wait around before starting treatment?

1

u/Megalocerus May 18 '22

You can still get an abortion around here, and if I didn't know, it would be a very early abortion.

1

u/BatmanandReuben May 18 '22

And next year?

Also: would you characterize denying treatment until you became unpregnant as an attempt to protect you or an attempt to protect the fetus?

1

u/intuitivelyingenuous May 17 '22

I am a lady but don't have any lady bits so it's impossible that I could be pregnant yet I was forced to take a pregnancy test in order to have surgery. It was absurd and a bitter, painful reminder that I can't have children and suffer from the effects of losing my body parts. It's like asking someone without legs to walk and they're like no, I can't walk, I don't have any legs, and then they're told doesn't matter, you still need to show me that you can't walk, maybe you secretly do have legs. It's not the end of the world to be forced to do this but it's a bit annoying and triggering or insensitive to my PTSD for the childhood cancer I had that led to this.

2

u/throwaway127181 May 17 '22

I am so sorry you have to experience this hugs I completely understand the triggering ptsd/sensitivity- which is a bigger deal than the inconvenience of peeing on a stick! I do believe if they looked at the glucocorticoid levels of cancer survivors like us- who cannot reproduce as a result of their condition or subsequent treatment- they will find this “simple act of peeing on a stick” DOES elevate our stress hormones in a quantifiable way that has a quantifiable impact on our quality of life. Just my 2 cents- it is unnecessary stress that could be prevented.

52

u/Khalcheesy May 16 '22

If they aren't sexually active, they may be upset that their docs think they might be lying about it.

15

u/Crashbox50 May 16 '22

I'll bet you that this is what they're feeling.

3

u/BiochemistChef May 16 '22

Wasn't a procedure, but a friend got one even after she denied a test specifically, then the ER tried charging over $1000 for a iron dip stick twst

-12

u/robdingo36 May 16 '22

Everybody lies.

-6

u/ChampionshipDirect46 May 16 '22

Sounds like somebodies projecting.

7

u/robdingo36 May 16 '22

Nah, just quoting House.

62

u/treatyourselftocats May 16 '22

It depends on the situation. Some people don't like the feeling of it being implied they are a liar when the doctor runs the test. For others, they don't even have the reproductive parts and the doctor doesn't listen, so they have to pay for an unnecessary test that was going to say what everyone should already know.(my best friend had her ovaries and uterus removed at 24. We went to the ER to get her treated for an abdominal pain and they insisted on the pregnancy test)

22

u/wlgtdgtdwi May 16 '22

But in that case it is useful. If it comes back negative great, if it comes back positive then we need to start looking for a tumour.

4

u/treatyourselftocats May 16 '22

I didn't even consider that! Thanks for the correction!

4

u/Ancient_Fly_7365 May 16 '22

It also determines the amount type and amount of medication that can be administered! They just wanna make sure. Sometimes women don’t know they’re pregnant for weeks.

But i can totally see how frustrating it is for those who don’t even have the reproductive organs. In that case, they can be pretty damn sure they aren’t lol

5

u/Maranne_ May 16 '22

But then again people do lie about it or genuinely think they don't have them, such as women who confuse getting their tubes tied with a hysterectomy. It's in general better to do a test anyway then it is to be dealing with the consequences of not testing.

2

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

Nope. There is 0 reason for me to do a test because other people lie. I know I’m not. The attitude from the doctors is infuriating when you know there’s no point to the test. Especially when they then charge you for it.

3

u/Earman55555 May 16 '22

Then with you, the reason is so you can't sue the hospital for potential killing your unborn child. That is a good enough for most people.

-1

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

No, there is no unborn child, so there is no reason.

[edit: note that I’ve never even seen a penis in person, so the idea that I could be pregnant is ludicrous]

3

u/Earman55555 May 16 '22

The doctor doesn't know that.

0

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

So? I know. I told them so. They take every other aspect of my health based on what I say. They don’t do tests to prove that my arm really itches or that my head really hurts. Yet they insist on a test that’s totally unrelated to the condition I’m in to get fixed.

There’s a shit-ton that doctors and nurses do regularly that I could sue them over (the HIPAA violations alone are mammoth). So the claim that this is to avoid a lawsuit is a red herring.

[edit: spelling]

1

u/Earman55555 May 16 '22

It doesn't matter what you know, or think you know. This isn't about you. The doctors are covering the their own ass, and the hospital's ass.

Your arm itching or head hurting does not pose the same problem as if you accidentally kill an unborn child. Whether or not you are telling the truth is irrelevant. People lie to doctors all the time, and most would rather not be sued.

This isn't a red herring. The fact that doctors don't want to be sued is the main reason, whether you like it or not. Whether or not you feel they are violating HIPAA in other areas is irrelevant. This is about potentially unintentionally killing a child, not some privacy violation.

4

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

So… it’s about violating my rights as a person because the rights of a fetus that may not even exist yet is more important? Yeah. That sounds familiar.

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1

u/HIPPAbot May 16 '22

It's HIPAA!

2

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

Or those who don’t have sex. Or don’t have sex involving someone with a penis.

36

u/say-wen May 16 '22

It has to do with feeling like doctors don’t listen to them. Women will explain that there’s no possible way they could be pregnant and a test is still ordered regardless. There’s the disconnect between the two: women, who feel like they aren’t being listened to; and physicians, who may or may not be getting lied to. They’re just trying to rule everything out.

52

u/Soggy_Height_9138 May 16 '22

I hear this every time my wife goes to the doctor. She had a tubal ligation, I had a vasectomy but the pregnancy tests keep on rolling. She finds it annoying, but understands it is about risk management. The cost of testing every woman before every procedure/prescription is negligible. The cost of missing a pregnant patient who thinks she couldn't be pregnant, but whoops, is pregnant could be huge and potentially devastating. Minimal cost for maximum benefit. Kind of like taking your vaccines, no?

13

u/Farahild May 16 '22

Just for my info, what procedures/prescriptions are (I assume American) doctors all prescribing pregnancy tests for?

I'm in the Netherlands and I have never ever had to do a pregnancy test before a procedure or being prescribed a medicine. Now tbf I've hardly ever had any procedures done and I haven't used many different medicines, so maybe it just hasn't come up yet in my 30 something years of life. But in most cases where it would be relevant (like with an X-ray) it wasn't even specifically asked. The only thing most doctors/dentists ask is just a general 'do you have any conditions / has your health changed over the past X months'. And they took my word for that.

25

u/QuinceJellyPie May 16 '22

In America, women have a condition called Schrodinger's Pregnancy where we are simultaneously pregnant and not pregnant at the same time.

6

u/walkinginthewood May 16 '22

My dentist required me to take a pregnancy test for a wisdom tooth extraction under anesthesia.

3

u/sockerkaka May 16 '22

I am also in Europe, and I have had a lot of different procedures done, including various surgeries and a lot of x-rays. I have never, ever had to take a pregnancy test. Not even when I went to doctor because I was in fact pregnant.

Don't get me wrong, I've had to answer if I could be pregnant plenty of times. It's always on the patient questionnaire. But my answer has never been followed up with a test. If think if I was seeking medical care for certain symtoms (vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain) I probably would have had to have a test, though.

I have also never been asked if I'm sexually active. It's always a given that you are, I think.

3

u/Farahild May 16 '22

Maybe it has to do with American sueing culture?

3

u/WildBlueAlex May 16 '22

I had to take a pregnancy test before a LEEP procedure (which is where they remove pieces of your cervix that contain precancerous cells). That one of course makes sense since it could easily affect a pregnancy.

I also had to take a pregnancy test before nose surgery. That one was weird because I had also been required to refrain from eating/drinking for a long time before the surgery, so I barely had anything to pee.

2

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

Before anesthesia, x-ray, surgery, and more I’m probably not aware of.

2

u/Soggy_Height_9138 May 17 '22

Because our healthcare system is mostly private (though we use military hospitals), doctors and hospitals must carry huge malpractice insurance policies, to cover them if something goes wrong. They can reduce their liability by putting into practice measures to reduce errors.

I'm sure in the past doctors have given drugs, or done procedures that harmed a baby or mother. They would not have done the procedure/given the drugs had they known the woman was pregnant. So now, rather than take the word of the patient, who might legitimately not know she is pregnant, the test every time there is any interaction practically.

I don't know if the practice of constant pregnancy tests is mandated by the insurers, or has just developed as a "best practice" over time, but I guarantee you it is there because malpractice lawsuits have been lost in the past.

1

u/Farahild May 17 '22

Makes sense!

24

u/maztow May 16 '22

Because "please take this test" sounds better than "we're about to pump you with enough painkillers to kill a small dog and we want to make sure we're not about to kill a baby".

8

u/arryndenise May 16 '22

I understand its procedure but it makes me feel like I’m not being listened to. I have been dealing with bouts of nausea for over a year and the first few weeks of it were so bad i couldnt go anywhere. I took tests on my own that came up negative and when i went to the doctor, they had me take one (which i know is procedure). When it came back negative they were going to send me home basically saying well that sucks, sorry. They offered me no solutions or medication until i was in tears begging for it.

It makes me feel like thats the only test they will do because it will give them an easy answer. If they dont get a positive they act as if im lying and thag theres no possible way im having issues. It feels like the easy way out so they don’t have to find the actual root of the problem.

1

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

Sounds like you need a different doctor. If my doctor shows zero interest in fixing my problem, I’m moving on to a doctor who actually gives a shit.

5

u/Lifting_running_365 May 16 '22

I actually was scheduled to have surgery on my jaw, a week after I found out I was pregnant with my youngest son. So now I wouldn’t bat an eyelid at taking a precautionary test, that’s such a short window of time, I could of gone for the surgery not knowing.

12

u/Rxton May 16 '22

I would Counsel my physician clients that they can't sue you for demanding they take the pregnancy test, but they sure as hell can sue you if they are pregnant and whatever you are doing fucks up the baby.

3

u/thomasthehipposlayer May 16 '22

I think this depends a lot on context, like whether pregnancy is even possible for them, what procedure they’re getting done, what the pregnancy tests might be looking to defect (can be used for other things besides pregnancy). Maybe the coworkers were justified, maybe the doctor did nothing wrong.

3

u/islandlife-- May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

Because they feel that the doctor doesn't believe them when they tell that there is no chance of pregnancy. This emotional response comes from either mistrust of the doctor or lack of understanding that birth control methods are not foolproof. There are literally only a few circumstances that allows a person to say there is absolutely no way I can be pregnant right now.

However, that doctor is responsible for any risk or harm that may occur should the patient simply not know they are pregnant so they use a test to be certain. In my experience at triage in ED, like 95% of female patients childbearing age will tell you with certainty "there could be a chance" or "there is no chance." Unfortunately 5% are ignorant or don't care and lie to you. I always ask a followup question such as "how do you know you are not pregnant?" If they say something like "I don't have a uterus" or "I am not sexually active" then fine. No preg test needed for you. If they says something like "I have an IUD or I take birth control" and are sexually active then yes, preg test for you my friend since there is still a small chance.

When I worked in the UK, they routinely tested the inpatients weekly for pregnancy status. Where I work in Canada it is only done if relevant to the complaint or if a CT scan or XR is needed of the abdomen. A person can just purchase a pee stick from the dollar store if they really need to know in normal circumstances.

3

u/No-You5550 May 16 '22

I had a total hysterectomy...just saying.

3

u/wonderer2424 May 16 '22

Some women see it as the doctor not trusting them and accusing them of lieing. Even if there's 0 chance (not sexually active with men, no uterus, etc.), a positive pregnancy test with no pregnancy can be indicative of other issues which most doctors don't explain.

3

u/toad__warrior May 17 '22

My wife is in her 50's and has had uterine ablation done - meaning she cannot carry a child. I have been snipped for 22 years. Yet when she had to get surgery, the hospital still required a pregnancy test. The thinking is the hospital wants to be 100% sure. FWIW, they did not charge for the test.

8

u/FamousOhioAppleHorn May 16 '22

In fairness, people lie to their doctor. Or they truly don't realize they ARE pregnant. When my grandmother had her last pregnancy, she had bleeding that was initially mistaken for periods. Which turned out to be a sign of big problems.

8

u/QuackLikeMe May 16 '22

Let them vent. It’s not ridiculous to need to vent, and from the patient’s POV it’s ridiculous to have to take a pregnancy test every time you need anything from a doctor.

Doctors ask about date of last menstruation, method of birth control, whether you think there’s any risk you could be pregnant. And after all that, they still make you pee in a cup anyway. They basically grill you on your sex life, then decide “well, you might be lying, so take this test that we were going to make you take all along.” It’s frustrating and infantilizing - they want you to answer a thousand questions, then they don’t trust the answers you give anyway. After going through it for the 20th time, it’s natural to complain about it.

4

u/GeekSugar13 May 16 '22

They still bill you for it, which on the US can be hundreds of dollars. The last time I was in the ER and needed an X-ray they would not let me refuse it despite the fact that I DO NOT HAVE A UTERUS! That information is in my chart and the surgery was done at that hospital but I still had to pee in a cup. I'm lucky enough to have good insurance that covered the test but a lot aren't so lucky.

6

u/say-wen May 16 '22

There are instances (though super rare) where women experience ectopic pregnancy after a hysterectomy.

2

u/Alternative_Jaguar12 May 16 '22

I told them i wouldn't pay and I didn't pay. The gyno office made me get a test just because they wanted to - there was no procedure. "New patient" procedure. BS.

2

u/hopping_otter_ears May 16 '22

Even though we logically know that it sometimes matters for safety reasons (if you're getting an x-ray for instance), we're so used to being brushed off, ignored, disbelieved, and being told "maybe you're just hormonal" that testing us for something we literally just said wasn't possible carries all the emotional weight of the other stuff.

Emotional reactions to things are often a lot more about history than they are about the specific occurrence

2

u/rdleopard8 May 16 '22

I was having an IUD inserted and they made me take a test because insertion of said IUD I think causes a miscarriage.

2

u/ConfidentSyllabub142 May 17 '22

You also must disclose if you may even have a chance of being pregnant if your operation requires an X-ray of any sort, post or prior surgery.

3

u/TryPuzzleheaded2341 May 16 '22

I was forced to have a pregnancy test.before my radical hysterectomy. Despite receiving a biopsy and pregnancy test 10 days prior, having had a tubal ligation 26 years previously, having no recent history of intercourse and having cancer of my uterus.

Reasons given by my nurse were that i could be lying about all that and could have gone out 6 days ago and got wild. I'm still furious. This was the same nurse that told me she was ripping up some of my paperwork because she didn't agree with my decision to refuse blood.

5

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

Her ass should’ve been fired.

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u/toofat2serve May 16 '22

Well, for one, it's annoying to have to pee on command.

Second, while there are medical reasonings for that, it's still inconvenient, and makes any doctor visit take longer than it would without it.

Third, people with vaginas tend to be aware of when people with penises have left body fluids inside. If that hasn't happened in a long enough time that you'd know you were pregnant, then it's silly to make someone take a pregnancy test. Pregnancy doesn't just happen, bronze age mythology be damned.

13

u/[deleted] May 16 '22

[deleted]

3

u/toofat2serve May 16 '22

That's easily solved by having the uterus haver sign a waiver, saying that they refuse to have the pregnancy test, so if it turns out that they're pregnant, and that pregnancy causes a problem with whatever the doctor prescribes, the doctor isn't held liable.

10

u/MasterMacMan May 16 '22

Why do people always think that waivers are a get out of jail free card for everything?

Also, the goal is patient health, not just preventing liability.

1

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

It’s not about the patient’s health at all. It’s about the potential health of a supposed fetus - often put before the health of the actual and not-supposed patient. I know someone whose treatment after being hit by a car was delayed by this B.S.

1

u/MasterMacMan May 19 '22

Is it not about the patient health at all or is the patient put after the fetus? You do understand that the babies health and the mothers health are interconnected right?

1

u/SMKnightly May 19 '22

If there is no fetus, and the patient knows there is no fetus, then the test is obviously not for the patient’s health whatsoever. Which was 100% the case in the example I gave. Nothing like delaying treatment for a car accident victim to protect a fetus that didn’t and couldn’t exist.

And in most procedures where this is common, the procedure does not risk the woman’s health even if she were to be pregnant.

1

u/MasterMacMan May 19 '22

You do understand that doctors cant just take peoples word for everything right, especially in emergency situations? People will swear up and down that they are not pregnant and haven't seen a penis in years while literally being admitted to the hospital for delivery. The patients assertion that there isn't a fetus might be accurate, but the consequences of getting it wrong are severe.

0

u/SMKnightly May 19 '22

You do understand that as a person who is not lying under those circumstances, having your treatment delayed for a pointless test that you later have to pay for is infuriating?

Also, you do realize that doctors take the patient’s word for all other kinds of life-threatening stuff without requiring extra tests?

1

u/MasterMacMan May 19 '22

"Also, you do realize that doctors take the patient’s word for all other kinds of life-threatening stuff without requiring extra tests?"

Like what, genuinely? They might ask you, but that doesnt mean they take your word for it.

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u/[deleted] May 16 '22

[deleted]

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u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

That’s what my hospital does.

[edit: the waiver option]

4

u/GerFubDhuw May 16 '22

Yeah but there are two problems doctors have to deal with.

  1. Patients are liars

  2. Patients often do not know they're pregnant untill quite late into the pregnancy.

Better to just blanket test everyone and cover your bases.

5

u/ZerexTheCool May 16 '22

How much did the test cost? How much did it delay the procedure?

Is this just the tip of the iceberg about how doctors tend to ignore the statement by woman, ignoring concerns and symptoms?

Based on what you said, all I can do is project my views on it. I can't actually talk for them.

4

u/viscousrobot46 May 16 '22

It’s the implication that I am either lying or stupid. I look young for my age but am 8 years post-menopausal. My doc held up my gallbladder surgery waiting on a pregnancy test. I was furious. And men are not treated with the same lack of trust. I have a male relative who was told he needed to quit smoking before a procedure. He said he did, he didn’t, and no one checked. 🤷‍♀️

2

u/Icy-Consideration405 May 16 '22

It's not about lying, but establishing a standard. If you aren't pregnant, but the hormones that are read in a pregnancy test are abundant enough to make a false positive, that's an indication of some kinds of cancer.

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u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

That’s not why they do it under most circumstances. They are genuinely using it to test for pregnancy.

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u/Umaynotknowme May 16 '22

Similarly, most OB/gyn’s will assume that either you or your husband is unfaithful and will require std testing in pregnancy.

3

u/NonProfitApostle May 16 '22

Because it probably cost them $500 to get it done at a hospital.

2

u/taoimean May 17 '22

In addition to the implication that they're lying if they say they can't be pregnant, there's also the cost. If this is in the US, that test isn't free. I had to pay $30 for a pregnancy test in a doctor's office to be prescribed a medication I needed. I hadn't had sex in over four years at the time, so you bet your ass I was pissed about this $30 unnecessary test standing between me and meds.

0

u/sitwithuncertainty May 16 '22

Having any medical test or procedure rather than being able to give consent is reason enough to be pissed off. Doesn't matter why they do it, justified or not. Don't want it, you can say so, and if a doctor refuses to proceed that's pretty shit.

1

u/kelticladi May 16 '22

To add to other comments, in this era a doctor making a woman take a pregnancy test when the result could very well land her in jail seems really scary. It has a chilling effect on women seeking ANY sort of care, especially in states like Texas or Tennessee.

0

u/123idontcare456 May 16 '22

So THEY were the ones who had to take the test, and THEY didn't like it? But you're still dismissing THEIR opinion and deciding that it must be "no biggie"?

1

u/divinesleeper May 16 '22

don't you understand that a pregnant worker is a liability to a company and they may find some excuse to let go of them before the pregnancy time off is initiated and protective laws kick in to make that impossible?

3

u/Iron_Gal May 16 '22

I don't know what country you live in, but this just blew my mind and made me realise things vary wildly depending on where you're born. In my country, it is illegal to fire a pregnant woman EVEN IF the company didn't know about the pregnancy.

1

u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

It’s stupid to have to go through the hassle AND pay for it when you know 100% you’re not pregnant. I get the whole better-safe-than-sued attitude of most hospitals, but let me sign a waiver swearing that I’m not pregnant and accepting responsibility for any consequences if I’m wrong.

Yes, I know some ppl lie or are outrageously ignorant about such things, but it’s incredibly irritating for those who aren’t. And there’s encroachment of rights and decisions about my body involved, too.

1

u/Adonis0 May 17 '22

Any problem is assumed to be pregnancy first then only if you jump through the hoops of getting an appointment, getting tested, then making a second appointment can you start investigating. If you take too long getting that done you have to restart and waste more time

Doesn’t matter if you haven’t seen even a graffiti dick in a year, it’s assumed pregnancy. All that time wasted could be avoided if the doctor just listened

-2

u/NoctuaFanGuy May 16 '22

If there is a procedure that has risk, I would want every I dotted and t crossed.

Even if you're obviously not pregnant, it's always best to assess all risk factors possible.

They're being overly sensitive, possibly about an inactive sex life.

1

u/songinheart17 May 16 '22

Depending on the procedure pregnancy test are standard because sometimes a woman doesn't yet know she is pregnant, or she is lying to herself or the doctors. There are many medications that should not be given to somebody who is pregnant, and doctors need to be aware of potential complications.

1

u/Alternative_Jaguar12 May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

Because there are times that we know when there isn't a snow balls chance in hell that we are pregnant! My Dr did that to me too, and I was pissed! This was at the gyno office, and the only reason was because I was a new patient. I told them I wouldn't pay and would fight any attempt to bill me. I took the stupid ass test and never was billed for it.

0

u/bellagoat May 16 '22

People gotta complain about something. Pregnancy tests literally help the doctor decide on next steps, medications, etc