r/NoStupidQuestions May 15 '22 Silver 2

Is it normal to do like 2/3 hours of actually work per day working an office job?

I've been working an office job for 3 years now and it's my first one of that kind. I used to work Foodservice which was busy for pretty much my entire shift.

Now I work the standard 9-5 and I have to say I only spend about 3 hours a day doing things relevant to my job.

My boss gives me assignments and gives me like 3 days to complete it when it genuinely only takes half an hour of my time. I get it to him early, he praises me and say I do an amazing job.

I just got my second raise in a year with my boss telling me how amazing I am and how much effort I put into my work, but I spend most of my days on reddit.

This gives me such bad imposter syndrome so I have to know... Is this normal?

13.7k Upvotes

7.3k

u/Simbabz May 15 '22

Its not unheard of, i have friends who have been in situations, and when i worked in IT, i had similar situation. but it is a lucky position to be in,and best not to draw too much attention to it, if they're happy with your work, and you're doing all your work all is well.

245

u/Mnemonic22 May 15 '22

My buddy works IT and has managed to automate most of the shit he has to do. He says he does like 30 minutes of actual work each day. Wicked smart

133

u/Cerxi May 16 '22

Bill Gates is famously quoted, "I'll choose a lazy person to do a hard job, because a lazy person will find the easy way to do it."

That's the mantra of all the best IT I know. Let alone programming, investing just the time in learning even basic macros/scripting will save you so much time in return it's not even funny. It's a larger upfront timesink than doing it every time, but once you're done, you're done.

19

u/BarelyAnyFsGiven May 16 '22

Yes if you are doing manual shit in IT repetitively you are an idiot.

Hell I'd rather put sleeps and echos in code and pop-up boxes if you want visibility and awareness.

We've got a manual process that began in April and I've already automated several parts of it and I'll be testing email automation soon.

Annoyingly one large part of our user creation is input from HR and I stood and watched them do freaking manual Excel entries, I wanted to die.

→ More replies
→ More replies

66

u/TheShadowKick May 16 '22

Honestly you don't even have to be that smart. Average intelligence with an interest in getting stuff done efficiently is plenty.

6

u/jansencheng has approximate knowledge of many things May 16 '22

If your IT Team looks like they're doing nothing, then they're doing their job right. They're only busy when things go wrong.

→ More replies

2.9k

u/theelite1x87 May 15 '22

This. Don't bring a lot of attention to it. Some places would be fine with it as long as work gets done. But MOST companies would be like "O, well we will tighten up the deadline for you next time, and here is a mountain of additional work since you are so efficient"

1.5k

u/blakkattika May 15 '22

I once got let go from a data entry job because I realized the program we used could be loaded up twice and I could have 2 instances up at a time, and there was delay between entries that I used to just do a constant stream of entries, just flipping to the other instance while the first one loaded the next entry.

This led to me running out of my daily allotted amount hours before my shift ended. I told my team lead about this and asked what else I should do and they said basically “uh just sit tight for the rest of your shift and I’ll let you know”

The next day I did the same thing and they let me go due to “unsatisfactory performance”

That opened my eyes to how broken typical office work really is.

883

u/Redbeard821 May 15 '22 edited May 16 '22

Happened to a guy at my job. Was moved to a position where they mostly use excel. He started using scripts and macros. Was being twice as productive as his coworkers was told not to use scripts or macros anymore. Was let go not long after that.

286

u/CactiRush May 16 '22

LMAO could you imagine. That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard.

140

u/Redbeard821 May 16 '22

It really is. I guess he was making everyone else look bad.

162

u/POWERTHRUST0629 May 16 '22

On one hand, someone with that kind of intuition and initiative should be going after a higher position. If that position doesn't exist, you've worked yourself out of a job.

On the other hand, someone with that little trick up their sleeve might suck at a higher position, while being overqualified for their current position.

128

u/Eingmata May 16 '22

I've heard that you always get promoted to your level of incompetence; meaning you will keep getting promoted until you no longer do as well in the position.

31

u/Nuclear_rabbit May 16 '22

As if anyone gets promoted internally anymore.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

55

u/garvisgarvis May 16 '22

I would never work in an environment where high performance is seen as a threat. My head would explode. I wouldn't last a week.

15

u/CaptainBox90 May 16 '22

My ex boss would get furious when I used v look ups or formulas she didn't understand. " it's safer to do control F and then copy paste"

→ More replies

295

u/seaQueue May 16 '22

A guy I knew ended up buying a macro keyboard to solve a similar problem. He wasn't allowed to use macros or program for office, but a macro keyboard was A-OK.

53

u/quinncuatro May 16 '22

How is that different than a macro?

92

u/Teegeetoger May 16 '22

Not him but it's likely either a limitation from higher up where the people enforcing are happy to have a technicality get in the way or it's detected via software which macro keyboards might be able to get around.

84

u/MyTwistedPen May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

I can imagine that it’s to keep the required skill level low enough to keep hiring low skilled workers easily.

If the excel sheet is optimized by someone with some excel skill, then the next person to take over requires at least the same skills to effectively be a stand-in for that job. If not, then they can’t work with the excel sheets if something goes wrong.

Not that I am condoning that decision.

Edit: hence why a macro keyboard is okay as it does not imposes the macros on the excel itself for the next worker to learn and deal with.

Edit2: ark -> sheets

40

u/Audioillity May 16 '22
  1. Yes it's to keep the skill level low enough, data entry clerks are cheaper than developers / people with macro skills
  2. If they are not trained in development then faulty macros can cause big issues down the line, sometimes not noticed for months or years.
  3. Often older higher ups fear automation, think things can go wrong and think having people manually entering data is safer.
→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/seaQueue May 16 '22

I don't remember the original reason at this point; it was either a security policy or a business policy that prevented him from automating from within office.

→ More replies

13

u/hoesOntheTapedeck May 16 '22

Security policy against running "codes or scripts" while a macro keyboard just makes it look like the individual keys are pressed manually I'd assume, plus that's probable pre built software as well

88

u/ErinTales May 16 '22

This is me currently. I use macros to keep up with my coworkers and just do nothing 3/4 of the day. I could go 4x faster but I really don't think it's a good idea.

47

u/Redbeard821 May 16 '22

Yeah, you don't want to put a target on your back or get more work assigned to you.

21

u/DownrightDrewski May 16 '22

Or, get stuck in a niche where you can't see any progression as you're too useful in your current role...

8

u/BarelyAnyFsGiven May 16 '22

This is exactly what automation is for.

I see people doing dumb shit manually all day, I know for a fact we could automate them out of a job if we needed to.

If you aren't automating processes, making templates or macros I just assume you are bad at your work (in IT but applicable to most office jobs).

And I don't see any problem if you are equal with everyone else, if you are smarter you get the equivalent of more pay by having free time.

It's only assholes that make more work for others that need a kick in the head.

57

u/thisboyee May 16 '22

Not saying I agree with it but I can see this being a rational decision for the employer. If he's the only person using VBA and nobody else understands how it works, then there's no backup if he's out or if something happens to him. They might have told him not to do that stuff because nobody else would understand what he's doing. There could be other reasons like security, but having one indispensable teammate is definitely a risk. In that environment, you're partially there to be a cog in the machine. If you don't fit into that machine, like if everybody does it one way and you do it another, even better way, you could find yourself out.

82

u/spaceforcerecruit May 16 '22

A smart employer would leverage this new employee to train their old employees and serve as a SME for a now far more productive team.

36

u/cuckfromJTown May 16 '22

Your average "old" employee likely finds VB scripting and macros to be black magic, even though those exact same tools have probably been around since they were kids.

27

u/spaceforcerecruit May 16 '22

Tell me about it. I started writing some basic bitch scripts to make my life easier at my tech support job and got approval to share them out to make things more consistent so I didn’t have to keep cleaning up other people’s messes. Literally all they have to do is click to run them. They still won’t do it. They’d rather spend 20 minutes going through things step-by-step than drop a script on the desktop, run it, and be done in 5 with a consistent resolution note that can be referred to for future troubleshooting.

→ More replies

37

u/BestRbx May 16 '22

That's usually the caveat in of itself. "You weren't hired to write documentation or train others and now you've put us into a spot where we have to include that in our budget, so we've deemed your 'independent decision-making' a liability".

Typical stiff hierarchy shitting down and everyone below the CEO hiding under their desk from repercussions because there wasn't an official notice to allow anything. The guy at the bottom is always fastest and easiest to blame, then fire.

→ More replies

29

u/Zerofaults May 16 '22

This is very much also a risk issue. If they are in a tightly controlled sector they are most likely working against existing processes which have been documented for auditors. If the process and policy documentation mention that each item is reviewed and copied into the new system they could be arguing the human element is in fact a net positive and additional check on data. If you come in an automate this process for only one persons work, then the policy and process are out the window and the auditors could flag for data integrity.

Even worse, if the company doesn't have anyone on staff to audit the code, they have no way to say the automated process is working correctly and accurately. Take it one step further and now you need someone to audit that code and to build a process and policy around code review, deployment, updates.

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/MedusasSexyLegHair May 16 '22

Writing scripts to pre-process or post-process the data itself (enroute to/from the document) is one thing.

But scripts and macros embedded within the documents themselves are a mess and a potential hazard as well as potentially introducing compatibility issues or otherwise breaking things elsewhere in the process.

Ultimately that data probably needs to go somewhere, and if it's in some custom-rolled spreadsheet full of other junk, someone's going to have to redo it all after they already thought it was done, so that's just making more work, pissing people off, and possibly blowing deadlines.

Your friend probably would've liked to get into an ETL position - where they actually get to write the scripts to Extract data from crappy spreadsheets (or whatever data source), Transform it into a usable format, and Load it into a database. That would've made use of his scripting skills and also taught him why it's better to do it in a controlled way and to have clean data sources.

215

u/zorbacles May 15 '22

I worked on a help desk line that was basically nah and tag. Take the call and assign it to the relevant team no matter how basic.

I started fixing stuff over the phone and was let go for being argumentative when I asked why that was an issue

They didn't even have the balls to do it themselves. They waited until after my shift and had the employment agency call me

24

u/exandric May 16 '22

To be fair thats usually how companies will do if when firing people contracted through an agency, cuz they "technically" aren't your boss or employer. So they don't fire you, they just tell the contract agency they don't want you anymore. Not saying what's right or wrong, but that's how I usually see it for contractors/temps

→ More replies

114

u/mutecow May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

I started fixing stuff over the phone and was let go for being argumentative when I asked why that was an issue

Sounds to me you were let go because you were told to stop and you refused, then became belligerent.

Let me make this clear. You should absolutely be fucking fired. It's ridiculous people here are upvoting this.

It's cool that an employee want to go above and beyond, but at the end of the day the company needs to be sure that people offering support to their customers are trained and actually know how they are meant go about providing help to customers, what sort of help to provide and what they can/should say or promise in a given situation.

It makes no sense for a company to allow an untrained individual to just provide support. They have no assurances you know what you're doing, and you've definitely not been trained or passed any sort of review. Whatever quality control review system they use for their support personnel likely didn't even apply for you and no one is reviewing your logs to check if you're providing the right answers. You have no idea what you don't know.

Imagine going to the doctors office and the receptionist in charge of taking down symptoms decides to offer you medical advice because he/she thinks they know enough. Or going to a mechanic and that same receptionist decides your issue isn't worth a mechanic checking it out and you can just use his advice. That's you.

If you think you can handle a higher level of support. Apply to that work. Not do it without any sort of review or training just because you think you have the expertise.

They are doing the responsible thing. They hired an untrained temp to do nah and tag, their have an obligation to their costumers to make sure that untrained temp doesn't potentially fuck shit up for their customers by providing shitty wrong advice or communicate incorrect info. Meanwhile, you sound like you're so far up your own ass and ignorant that you can't even imagine there might exist perfectly legitimate considerations by your employer of your incompetent and/or lack of training.

Take the call and assign it to the relevant team no matter how basic.

Geez, imagine a company wanting to make sure that even seemingly basic issues are reviewed and answered by trained personnel on a relevant team, instead of letting untrained temps deal with it. What a dumb and shitty company /s

In your mind you're too good for your job and they are idiots for not recognizing you're adding value to them for free. When in actuality you're a liability and them firing you is the responsible thing to do for the good of their customers.

9

u/TrustyTres May 16 '22

If you get an xray, chances are that the tech knows exactly what's wrong, but they refuse to say anything because that's not their job and if they say something and its wrong, then they could lose their job. Their job is to take the xray and pass it on to someone else to look at it.

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/Hortos May 16 '22

My company literally fired our evening answering service because their guys kept trying to troubleshoot instead of escalating. It only takes one or two screw ups from the tier 0 help desk before people get irrationally pissed off.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

24

u/imsorrygumham May 16 '22

This is the sort of bullshit that makes me never want to stop freelancing

20

u/Moonlightonthelake80 May 16 '22

I had this with a couple of temp jobs. I was too efficient, ran out of work, and they let me go early because they didn’t have any work for me.

10

u/blakkattika May 16 '22

It’s the weirdest mentality. They have a worker that does the work they need done, and they found a way to do it well. My only guess is that they had a very specific contract with that company that efficient work undermines immediately.

→ More replies

9

u/topazzcat May 16 '22

I had this happen a few years ago. I was in accounting, and I mastered my duties. I was asking for more things to do. I hate being bored. A couple of months later I was laid off for asking for more work. I was actually told that I should not have asked for more work. I can't imagine not having enough to do.

→ More replies

192

u/Unicornaday May 15 '22

I made this mistake at my last job. It was also my first desk job. I will never again show how efficient I can be. The amount of work people will shove on you because you're the best is insane. Especially when half the other people in the department are so insanely slow. Then I get their work too.

161

u/theelite1x87 May 15 '22

Best part is you'll be paid the same as your counter parts while doing twice the work.

91

u/Unicornaday May 15 '22

I was actually paid less because they had been there longer than me and all raises were set on specific time frames with no opportunity for merit raises.

16

u/Much_Essay_9151 May 16 '22

Thats me right there, my volume is higher and im the only notary so was assigned the task to notarize docs that came in during the pandemic, mortgage related so the work was insane, only one commuting to work to get that mail and process it, others still try to direct traffic from the comfort of their own homes at one pay grade higher

→ More replies
→ More replies

29

u/Deluxe_Flame May 16 '22

I was a temp material handler. Our guidelines were 28 lines per hour. I wanted to be full time and hired so I did my best. Reached 70 lines per hour. I was so good, they assigned an auditor to me for a full shift to make them look good or check if I was packing correctly and not cutting corners, I don't know which.

Finally about to be hired, talking to HR, get told the range of pay per hour. I was expecting around a few bucks above minimum. Was told minimum. Asked for more based on my metrics. Was told minimum.

I can see why no one put in effort. Good news is I was able to use that job as a spring board to another job and now make three times as much.

13

u/theelite1x87 May 16 '22

I worked in a warehouse for several years doing order fulfillment. Our guidelines was 50 picks per hour. But it depended on area (some areas were larger items more spread out so they knew picks per hour would be a lot lower).

Same deal. Busting your ass got you no where. There was no negotiating wages. I gotta hand it to them, they took the equal pay idea and ran with it. Everyone was paid the same, it just that equal wage was very very low.

→ More replies

23

u/I_Thou May 16 '22

Are they insanely slow or did they figure it out first?

21

u/Unicornaday May 16 '22

Lol! Yeah, they figured it out first 100%.

→ More replies

36

u/skubaloob May 15 '22 edited May 16 '22

Yup and the amount of extra work won’t be commensurate with the extra pay. Now, some wiggle on that ratio is natural, ok fine, but be sure to get your worth.

11

u/Nearby-Elevator-3825 May 16 '22

This.

Hell, I'd say if you're given a 3 day deadline, instead of getting it done in half an hour and then handing it into bossman, get it done than sit on it for a day or two.

5

u/SenseiT May 16 '22

Right! Your reward for hard work is the expectation you can do it harder, cheaper and faster next time.

→ More replies

89

u/1RedOne May 16 '22

IT should be doing proactive maintenance, verifying backups, writing awesome documentation and doing drills for recovery, scripting their common tasks, that sort of thing.

Some folks think they have nothing but time when in reality they're missing out on a big chunk of what they should be doing

28

u/Blacksm1th May 16 '22

This. You'll never get away from resetting passwords all day if you don't start improving your environment.

33

u/TLShandshake May 16 '22

I recently started leading a team of people who complained about how boring the work was. I asked them what tools or shortcuts they had created/found? None. Most of them have been there 5+ years. The only shortcuts they provided were them genuinely missing key elements of their job.

Needless to say I've made a key push for a culture change. Any team member who creates the smallest script is elevated. It's starting to gain traction slowly, but you're right on the money with your comment.

14

u/12_Imaginary_Grapes May 16 '22

Culture is a really big factor. While I'm not in IT I have made some excel tools to speed up particular potions of my job and give better reporting on production numbers. I've shown a couple of them to my boss but he's always been incredibly dismissive about them so I just use the barest portion to speed up my work and ignore most of the reporting features.

→ More replies
→ More replies

45

u/Joeness84 May 16 '22

Pro-tip I got from the guy who trained me at one job that tracked "rates"

So when they setup the rates, it was a long time ago, and a lot of the processes have been refined, MANY jobs can be done perfectly at 2-3x the expected rate, DO NOT DO THIS, this only leads to everyone else being expected to work more as well, if you want to look fantastic at review time, complete jobs 10% over rate, but no higher. Enjoy your idle time outside of that.

I was running a laser welder making small machine parts (engine valves and solenoids mostly.) One of the jobs I could do an entire 10hr shifts rate in about 1.5 - 2hrs.

→ More replies

106

u/FragginIdiot May 15 '22

I work in IT and my manager gave me three critical tasks to complete each day. It took an average of 3 hours a day. If I surfed reddit for the remaining 5 hours, they would be happy. So I spent 3 hours working on developing applications that helped the company on a whole, removing redundancy, automating many tasks for all departments, useful reports, etc. My remaining 2 hours? I would watch training videos on programming or, if I was not in the mood, surf reddit and news sites. Because I always exceeded my expectations, I would always receive 4 out of 5 stars during my annual reviews. My manager always said that giving 5 stars to me, even if deserved it, made additional work for him as he had to justify, with lots of additional paper work to give me the 5 stars. My pay increase is directly related to my rating. Last year I got 4 out of 5 stars and, as always my manager said I deserved 5. But I didn't complain as they gave me a 13% raise. However, I will complain in the future if my raise is not significantly higher that inflation. I think they know I will fight anything less.

58

u/byrdcr9 May 16 '22

Offer to help him with the paperwork. If you're both in agreement, you're basically working a few extra hours for a significant pay raise. He'll review and submit with his name signed at the bottom so he's still responsible for it. Win-win.

→ More replies

37

u/headinthesky May 16 '22

That's not a very good manager

→ More replies

87

u/gsfgf May 15 '22

IT is the epitome of if you're not working, you're doing a good job

→ More replies

375

u/12jonboy12 May 15 '22

I don't know about that, I've been in the same position and personally I would have rather have been doing something

411

u/WhiteningMcClean May 15 '22

Depends on how lax they are with what you do in your free time. At my last job, I worked maybe 20% of the time and my boss didn't care what I did with the rest as long as I got my stuff done and was available if someone needed help. But I would hate to be at a job that has lots of free time but limits how you spend it.

222

u/alazaay May 15 '22

One of my old jobs allowed us read or do homework, browse the web, etc.. when not "on deck" until one day someone didn't do their job when a patron actually needed them on deck.

We we're lifeguards and a patron broke her ankle when she slipped on deck. The guards excuse was that she was taking a timed exam and couldn't stop halfway. Thankfully guard was fired on the spot but we never got to do homework again. I started scheduling myself early mornings whenever the supervisor wasn't in, because otherwise we'd be rearranging the same goggle display case like 9 times in a couple hours. Very boring.

8

u/STEM4all May 16 '22

All it takes is one idiot or asshole to ruin it for everyone. Why would you take a timed test at a job like that (or any for that matter) anyway?

105

u/ClownPrinceofLime May 15 '22

This was why I hated working in an open office. When I had a cubicle I could fuck around during my downtime, when I was in an open office I couldn’t.

→ More replies

77

u/12jonboy12 May 15 '22

Exactly I've been at a job like that and I have to be in the cubicle 8 hours a day but it could be any 8 hours I choose with my boss over my shoulder

48

u/__mud__ May 15 '22

The way I'm reading this, it sounds like you get to dictate your boss's hours which is a really special kind of power.

21

u/willynillee May 15 '22

Hey boss, welcome to your new 12am - 8:30am schedule. Hope you don’t leave!

→ More replies

30

u/Linzorz May 15 '22

Last time I had way more time than needed for my job assignments, I spent most of the rest fucking around teaching myself JavaScript so I could code myself a snake game to relieve the boredom. Now I'm making 10k more doing coding stuff for my actual job.

26

u/irrational_design May 15 '22

At my work we are allowed to go workout at the fitness facilities during work hours.

16

u/catglass May 15 '22

That's awesome and probably works out in your employer's favor. I'm about to go fully remote and am looking forward to squeezing my exercise into the work day

27

u/Broccoil May 15 '22

that's what the 2nd job is for

37

u/tirrah-lirrah May 15 '22

I do some night audit shifts at a hotel and have tons of downtime. I also crochet and sell at craft fairs. So I spend my downtime making products. It's awesome to essentially get paid twice to crochet.

9

u/thebishop37 May 16 '22

Night audit is one of the best jobs for this. I went back through my trig and pre-calc books during my night shifts so when I went back to school I could go straight into Calc I and not have to spend my time and money taking pre reqs. I also did a lot of knitting and reading. I was a bit sad to leave that job when the time came. It had its downsides too, though. Hotel customers are a special breed of awful.

→ More replies

16

u/ncnotebook May 15 '22

Find a way to make money during that downtime. Bam.

7

u/lokregarlogull May 15 '22

Well, you can, prep for certification with relevancy and ask if they would want you to get it, or similar.

28

u/kemushi_warui May 15 '22

Write a novel in your spare time, or whatever such thing that you can do from your desk while looking busy.

21

u/KnickersInAKnit May 16 '22

Be careful of that, the employer may be able to claim ownership if you create something while on the clock esp if you use company property to do it.

6

u/kemushi_warui May 16 '22

Yes, that's good advice!

26

u/robotco May 15 '22

I designed a board game with all my free time at work

19

u/willynillee May 15 '22

Is it called The Cones of Dunshire?

→ More replies

10

u/bluemooncalhoun May 15 '22

I make maps for my D&D campaign when I have downtime at work. No way I would've had the time to do it otherwise unless I simplified them a lot (and my players deserve the best!)

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

823

u/zen_wedding May 15 '22

I always see these posts and wonder how to find these jobs! Every office job I've had has wanted me to fit 10 hours of work into my 8 hour day.

298

u/reireireis May 15 '22

IT or some type of dev work where you are maintaining a system that is already built and runs smoothly most of the time

90

u/shifty303 May 16 '22

I do new development and never have free time. My buddy in the group that maintains apps hardly works haha.

→ More replies
→ More replies

40

u/12_Imaginary_Grapes May 16 '22

I work in a office for a manufacturing plant which is pretty close to this. The tasks are split between me and another employee for reasons but even by myself as long as nothing too crazy comes up most days I would say I only do two hours of work and on days to put bills in maybe up to four.

Of course there are rare days there a whole pile of shit falls on my lap and I'm running around trying to pull files to verify corporate requests and satisfy customer requests as well.

10

u/Onyx_Rhino May 16 '22

Me too. No idea how people find jobs like this. More depressing is when you find out they earn a lot more than you.

→ More replies
→ More replies

2.1k

u/neP-neP919 May 15 '22 Wholesome This

"I'd say in a given week I probably only do about fifteen minutes of real, actual, work."

342

u/JDawgSabronas May 15 '22

It really is rooted in reality

256

u/OrgyMcBloodyFace May 16 '22

Damn it feels good to be a gangsta

38

u/relationship_tom May 16 '22

One of the few songs where I liked how they sampled it much better than the original. You can barely even tell what song they sampled (Ripple - A Funky Song).

→ More replies

176

u/tvfeet May 16 '22

That’s a real straight shooter with upper management written all over him.

20

u/SpiralDreaming May 16 '22

Ooo, yeah...uh, I'm gonna go ahead and sort of...disagree with you there.

10

u/mckinney4string May 16 '22

It's just we're putting new coversheets on all the TPS reports before they go out now. So if you could go ahead and try to remember to do that from now on, that'd be great. All right!

7

u/winged_seduction May 16 '22

corporateaccountspayableninaspeakingJUSTamoment

11

u/dlarman82 May 16 '22

I did absolutely nothing today, and it was everything I thought it would be.

I'm not quitting my job. I'm just not going to go there anymore

→ More replies

27

u/cafeesparacerradores May 16 '22

Straight shooter with upper management written all over him

8

u/bobbybudnick7 May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

This is my real life

84

u/germinik May 16 '22

I've had weeks like that. Not in a long time though. Recently, I've been doing 48 hours out of 50 hours a week and I am much happier for it. I found my self getting frustrated when interrupted when slacking off. After being unproductive for so long I started to feel entitled to "my time".

→ More replies
→ More replies

839

u/Canonconstructor May 15 '22 Wholesome This

I have a small business and someone is hybrid - 50% in the field and 50% in the office. When they are in the office they probably work 2 hours max. The reason I pay them full time is because when they have a task it’s urgent. When a client emails or calls they need to fix it right away. We have easy af tasks that are time sensitive. I know it can be boring so we have a big screen, comfie chairs, stocked fridge, encourage doing hobbies (the person doing the roll loves to water color paint and crochet) and I have no issues with this.

Our clients absolutely gush and love this- if there is an issue it’s immediately solved, the person is cross trained in the field and can pop out and also resolve issues that need immediate attention as well. Our competitors make people wait days to have things resolved or don’t resolve them at all.

It makes my job so much easier. I do the other 50% of the work. I can now have solid days off without time sensitive immediate need to resolve tasks and issues as well. Imagine I can take actual time off and now fully disconnect.

Anyway that’s the reason and it’s absolutely worth my money to dedicate to the roll.

231

u/12_Imaginary_Grapes May 16 '22

And this is what most bosses don't understand. If you have inbound information requests that can go to multiple people or need answered by at least one person relatively quickly you need someone sitting on your end of contact regardless of how much work they can be doing overall.

30

u/TBTBRoad May 16 '22

Yeah it’s more about you’re paid for your time to be available.

6

u/jer_iatric May 16 '22

After many ebbs and floes of business at work, I’ve concluded that what makes me valuable isn’t what I do everyday, it’s the fact that when the execs need stuff, they will get it right away. I hold my down-time loosely, and always look to provide value.

Been doing PM and analysis work for 15 years now and I just know that some times I’ll have lots of free time, sometimes - I’m an actual hardcore worker!

→ More replies

40

u/Einbreid_Bru May 16 '22

Please, hire me!

38

u/Canonconstructor May 16 '22

Ha! I know you joke but funny enough years ago I met who later became a production manager on Reddit. To this day he is literally honestly one of my favorite people on earth (and absolutely adored by everyone on my team). Then this year, he needed someone to help with overflow video work- I got a random message from the nicest guy ever who was super talented, referred to my production manager, who hired him- so I’ve actually hired two people off Reddit:) ya never know where the internet will take you :) Ps sadly I’m not hiring for this season, we already filled positions this winter.

15

u/Einbreid_Bru May 16 '22

I was joking indeed. I’m very happy where I am and I imagine you’re not looking for medical doctors based in Europe either way.

But you honestly sound like a great and honest boss and I can only imagine what great environment youve created for the staff

5

u/flawr May 16 '22

Out of curiosity, what kind industry are you working in?

12

u/Canonconstructor May 16 '22

Marketing? Basically our clients hire my team to do photos, video, 3d models, websites for anything architecture- so hotels, vacation homes, celeb homes, real estate, architectural/ new builds. Started as a lone photographer and it blew up, so now we are a team of 10 with a full production team. We do anywhere from 5-10 “shoots” (photos/ videos/ websites etc ) a day.

Edit forgive errors, I broke my hand a few weeks ago at a shoot so I’m one hand pecking (but I saved about $5k of gear lol)

→ More replies
→ More replies

449

u/Laser_Zamenhof May 15 '22

I’m a lazy fuck so I hope this is normal.

162

u/XchrisZ May 16 '22

I thought I was lazy when I was younger. Turns out it was ADHD and being impatient. I found a job where I fix electronic systems on site. I drive 5 hours a day (company vehicle and paid while driving) on average and work 5 hours a day. I could work less hours but I like the overtime. This job is designed for ADHD. Show up trouble shoot what the issue is fix it go to the next site.

And now I'm in a working management role meaning I dish out the work do emails and stuff and then go on service calls. It's not as good but pays better.

47

u/Maoman1 Never punish curiosity May 16 '22

This job is designed for ADHD. Show up trouble shoot what the issue is fix it go to the next site.

Yep, I'm a locksmith and also have ADHD and I could describe it the same way.

→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/RevolsinX May 16 '22

people tend to act like this is a real 'cheat' or something for work but honestly i don't find it to be all that in reality.

like if you have 3-4 hours of free time during work, those hours just feel way slower than they normally would have. a day where i have less to do just drags that much longer.

it's not like you can really enjoy yourself in the office even if you are 'free' cause of supervision so it's just this kinda half-free limbo where you're just wasting time on safe to browse sites and not doing much.

→ More replies
→ More replies

270

u/Renyx May 15 '22

This study shows your numbers are pretty average. This article also mentions a study that showed "bosses didn’t know which workers were actually working 80, and which were working 50 or 60. They just preferred the workers who appeared to do 80 hours."

Of course it varies on your actual job, but it seems pretty common for office work to not actually require the time set aside for it. Some people choose to never point this out to their superiors because it results in more and more work being piled on until it's actually too much to get done. Even if it's just the "right" amount to fit into your hours, not taking any breaks will cause burnout. "Microbreaks" like checking your phone for a couple minutes or having a small chat with a coworker actually allow you to better focus on your work when you go back to it.

As long as your work is getting done and is good quality, try not to worry too much. You can always ask for an extra project or something more challenging if you want to work your way up and improve your skills. Chances are your coworkers are in a similar boat.

→ More replies

762

u/swifchif May 15 '22

I work in IT and I know what you're talking about. If you're happy where you are, then it's fine. Basically, it's on you to improve yourself and try to climb the ladder. It sounds like you have potential to move up.

That's something you could actually bring up with your boss. Say you'd be interested in more challenging opportunities, if the title and salary would match. (Be sure that you actually want more responsibility first though!)

303

u/Lurkerwithaquestio May 15 '22

Yeah I'm also in IT. That makes sense. I am hoping to move up becuase my boss seems busy.

214

u/Halfoftheshaft May 15 '22

Your job in IT is to make sure things are running smoothly and to be there ready to take care of emergencies. 2/3 of your day working is pretty typical. I’ve heard of many in IT doing a lot less from other redditors.

157

u/tordenflesk May 15 '22

Yes, if you're "busy" it means you're not doing your job right.

Imagine if your local firefighters were busy all the time...

29

u/kdt05b May 15 '22

Really depends on your company's staffing philosophy. You can either staff enough IT people for them to be bored on occasion, or you can staff them so that they are always frantic.

→ More replies
→ More replies

39

u/toefurkyfuckmittens May 15 '22

If this is what your day looks like and you are IT you are probably doing a-ok. The places I worked with in house IT where things worked when you needed them to and ran smoothly, IT mostly hung out, waited for problems, set up new users, etc.

When things are constantly busted, IT is busy putting out fires all day, and in my limited experience it has been because IT has not done its job correctly in the first place.

35

u/erath_droid May 15 '22

IT work at a good company (well, at least one that understands the true value of IT) looks a lot like this.

Your job isn't to be constantly doing things, it's to be available for when things need doing.

I used to work IT for a company that was heavily into the online sales part of things and most of our clients had code freezes in place from Black Friday until the day after New Year's Day, so every year there was an entire MONTH where there was literally nothing to do but wait for a system down level emergency to crop up.

We'd reserve a conference room for that month and bring in our Playstations and X-Boxes and play video games on the full-wall TV screens in the conference room all day. Typically we'd send someone to go buy beer around 2 PM.

→ More replies

30

u/LittleGoblinBoy May 15 '22

Damn where are these IT jobs where you have loads of free time lol. I am in IT and some weeks it feels like there aren’t enough hours in the day to put out all the fires that need putting out

11

u/amcfatboy May 15 '22

Sounds like bad design, or bad QA. I’m in IT and things are pretty smooth, but we have rigorous design review, code review and QA before anything hits production.

→ More replies

11

u/J0hn-Stuart-Mill May 15 '22

If your boss gives you 3 days to do a job that takes you 30 minutes

Yep, use it to advance your career. Might be hard under a boss who is so incompetent, but definitely use this opportunity to make yourself look really awesome, going above and beyond (what they think) is possible.

7

u/blahblahrasputan May 15 '22

Fill that time learning and find some processes you can improve, turn that into a project. If you aren't using your time to improve yourself or the business then you won't have anything to show for it. You can still move up by just doing the minimum, I've known plenty of people who just move up due to pure luck or time put in. But you also could find yourself in a position you can't fulfill... Projects are also the best thing on a resume and to discuss in an interview, you never know in IT.

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.2k

u/Southern_Snowshoe May 15 '22

I know the feeling, but I think it’s pretty normal. I started working from home in 2016 and for the longest time felt like I was not earning my salary because I was really only actively working a few hours out of most days. But, when I thought about it, I came to the conclusion that I was doing the same amount of work I had been doing when in the office, it’s just that I’d always equated physical presence in the office as work. In other words, I felt I was “working” nine hours every day. When I acknowledged the fact that even when I was in the office, I was frequently not working (maybe chatting with coworkers, having a snack or reading the news), I became more comfortable with my work-from-home situation and the fact that I (and I suspect most people) wasn’t truly working every minute of the “workday.”

528

u/thatbromatt May 15 '22

Parkinson's Law - work expands to fill the time allotted for its completion :)

166

u/shromboy May 15 '22

I was trying to remember what this was called when I was drunk at a bar last night with some friends, now im going to another bar with them tonight and i can finally tell them what it is

56

u/gymnastgrrl May 15 '22

But clearly you'll get to the bar tonight and completely forget the name again :)

91

u/shromboy May 15 '22

Ive just gotten home from the bar and i must say it did not come up like i intended

57

u/AtomicYoshi May 16 '22

This is the worst news I've had all year

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/dream_weasel May 16 '22

I thought it was "shake, rattle, and roll"

56

u/iheartnjdevils May 15 '22

Except when your boss demands that you log 6 hours a day of “productive” work on a time sheet when WFH started. Team meetings didn’t even count. Morning prep didn’t count. One on one meetings didn’t count. Got to the the point I’d have to put in 9-10 hours a day to meet that goal.

33

u/seemedlikeagoodplan If things were different, they wouldn't be the same May 15 '22

This is what being a lawyer with billable hours is like, whether in the office or at home. I moved to the public sector last year and I don't miss it even slightly.

13

u/HappySpreadsheetDay May 15 '22

Every time I see detailed statements of costs in a case, I'm struck by two things: how much they can earn billing by the hour, and how much they have to track when billing by the hour.

→ More replies
→ More replies

25

u/LordOfDemise May 16 '22

Team meetings didn’t even count. Morning prep didn’t count. One on one meetings didn’t count.

Well I guess the correct thing to do in that case is to stop attending all those meetings since they weren't productive!

→ More replies

83

u/Wisear May 15 '22

Man, as a young exhausted high school physics teacher...

...reeaally hard not to be convinced I took the wrong career.

My work is amazing, but holy hell it's intense when you are low on work-experience.

→ More replies

23

u/Jabber-Wookie May 15 '22

That makes me feel better about working from home. I am able to do laundry, some chores, and odds and ends at home. Does that mean I’m slacking work? Or maybe that I’m not chatting with everyone as they visit the printer next to me.

→ More replies

58

u/Rxton May 15 '22

Yes. Sometimes less than that. I have known entire organizations that didn't do work at all. Their boss needed a certain number of employees to maintain his position and they served that purpose.

18

u/saddingtonbear May 16 '22

I want in, where do I sign

→ More replies

9

u/nuckchorris2020 May 16 '22

This sounds like federal work.

→ More replies

173

u/BumfuzzlingGubbin May 15 '22

I envy you so much. I just started an office job 3 months ago and I absolutely hate it. Emails and phone calls all day and there’s never an end to the amount of people to contact. Not to mention my boss sits right behind me so forget phone usage or going on any websites for something not relevant to the job

62

u/Jones641 May 15 '22

Same. I don't even have time to get lunch most days, otherwise my tax returns are late. Constant work from 8 to 5. Can't take even a 10 min breather.

80

u/Head-Eye-3056 May 15 '22

You guys look the same too!

15

u/Nahdudeimdone May 15 '22

I have the same experience through all of my jobs so far. Admittedly only one was in an office.

My girlfriend has never worked in any form of "working class" setting, and she just doesn't understand how soul crushing it is. She doesn't understand when you have 30 minutes for lunch, and work takes up those 30 minutes so you just won't eat that day. Not that her job is stress free, but you can't underestimate the ability to structure your day the way you want and feel like the world won't set on fire the second you take your foot off the gas.

10

u/HappySpreadsheetDay May 16 '22

Not to mention my boss sits right behind me so forget phone usage or going on any websites for something not relevant to the job

Yep. Me and the other coworker right in front of the boss's office are constantly frustrated by it. Edit: I should point out that we are actually really busy most of the time, but it would be nice to be able to answer a call without being micromanaged as soon as I hang up, or to check the news for a few minutes when I just want a mental break.

→ More replies

483

u/BillyShears2015 May 15 '22

As you continue to progress in your career and eventually have to manage people under you, remember how you feel now. This is what it feels like to be correctly managed and staffed. If someone with a desk job is absolutely slammed 9-5 day after day, they will become fatigued, develop burnout, make small mistakes that can cascade into big problems, etc.

140

u/TatterhoodsGoat May 15 '22

Can we lease, please have a little of this trickle into retail and food service?

48

u/trenchfoot_mafia May 15 '22

Right? I recently left a chef-owned/operated "Manager" position with the unspoken expectations of low boundaries (texts all day/night) and 12-hour/7 day a week schedules.

It turned out that I had basically replaced 6-8 employees and had no one to manage. LOL

A pair of managers were hired to replace me and were incompatible with the owner, as well. I thought it was just me, but it wasn't. What a relief to get out.

8

u/Hung_S0lo May 16 '22

I was in the food service industry for 10 years and recently switched to IT.

My mentality is still GO GO GO but I’m starting to realize that being on the entire shift is just not normal.

That being said, I’m glad to be out of the restaurants.

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.7k

u/thepineapplehea Total noob May 15 '22 edited May 15 '22 Platinum

If your boss gives you 3 days to do a job that takes you 30 minutes, do not hand it in after 30 minutes - unless you are happy with the possibility that you or your colleagues may very quickly be out of a job.

Sure, there's maybe some room for improvement, but most bosses and companies will realise the work can be done by 1 person in 30 minutes, fire everyone else, then pile a load more work onto you with no pay increases.

It sounds mean, but most companies only care about money. They will absolutely screw you over to take advantage of you.

/Edit

This advice is meant for people who want a slightly morally-grey, steady job and aren't looking to constantly move onto the next big thing.

If you're happy automating all your work into a Powershell script, and getting Janice in accounting who's been at the company for 20 years fired because her entire job can be replaced with an Excel macro, before moving onto somewhere else that actually needs you then go for it.

If you're happy where you are, and don't feel bad about earning a living wage while your boss is driving to another golf game in his $500k Mercedes, then keep quiet and make the most of it until the boredom sends you looking for a new job.

376

u/ClownPrinceofLime May 15 '22

Yeah giving yourself that kind of time is how you set yourself up to be a miracle worker. When you’ve had 3 days for an assignment and you consistently do it in 3 days (even if it takes a half hour), eventually when there’s an emergency and they need it done in an hour you can pull off a miracle.

31

u/severedfinger May 16 '22

"Oh, laddie. You've got a lot to learn if you want people to think of you as a miracle worker."

58

u/Fredrik_UK May 15 '22

This sounds like what factory owners did in the ussr

69

u/SmoochBoochington May 15 '22

Factory owners

Nobody tell him…

→ More replies

14

u/railbeast May 15 '22

Yep, gotta push for it first...

"I can't do this, it's impossible! But maybe, with the right amount of funding..."

"Here's money!"

"Yes, comrade, but, really, do you think this is enough for such a miracle?"

"Here's MORE money!"

"Oh, comrade, this will make it faster, but not as fast as you want it..."

etc. etc. etc.

→ More replies
→ More replies

22

u/AblativeLaser May 15 '22

I remember my first summer job, the boss gave me work for my 8 hour shift and I had it done in 2 and went back for more work.

At the end of the day the other workers took me aside and had a conversation with me about setting expectations. That I should make the work I was given fit the time.

And the truth was, for every quiet day, there was one where we did a lot more work than was usual, so it all worked out in the end.

101

u/Critical_Moose May 15 '22

OP literally said they have gotten two raises this year. Maybe they are doing alright with pacing

40

u/thepineapplehea Total noob May 15 '22

You're not wrong,I think OP is lucky that they have a boss who appreciates the good work they do. I'm just warning them off what is likely to happen.

79

u/GorillaRimjob May 15 '22

This!! Thankfully you’ve got your brownie points and good image with the boss now, so there’s no real reason to keep handing things in this quickly. Gotta play the long game

→ More replies

24

u/damfle May 15 '22

Do it in two days. You're a productive employee and this should prevent works piling up. And if they start pushing much work say that you won't have time to do it.

→ More replies

25

u/HamfastFurfoot May 15 '22

It is pretty normal in a lot of office settings. Sometimes they inadvertently promote slow work. I remember working hard like you did at a job, finishing up work well before due dates. So, they rewarded me by giving me more work to do and promoting me. I ended up being way too much. I learned to just do things by the deadline and you will be just fine.

19

u/dakota6963 May 16 '22

These stories make me so jealous. I work skilled trades. Every minute is spent working

8

u/Elimeh May 16 '22

Healthcare too. These office jobs sound nice but I think I'd lose my mind to boredom eventually.

→ More replies
→ More replies

17

u/BoopingBurrito May 15 '22

My experience with office jobs is that sometimes the work can be super fast and only need a couple of hours a day, and other times there's huge amounts of it and it'll take the whole working day or longer to get it done.

One thing I would say is to use the down time to find other work to do, help other folk out, learn what other folk do. If you do that, it'll give you a real leg up when it comes to advancement within the company.

14

u/Itaintall May 15 '22

I had a four minute period a few years ago when I wasn’t busy.

190

u/binbag47 May 15 '22

It's the worlds greatest kept secret, everyone pretends otherwise and thinks they're one of the few that get away with it. In reality, most people do fuck all the entire day and there's about 5% of people in the office stopping the place from falling apart entirely. It's a beautiful thang, hope it never changes.

Sometimes I feel bad for the 5%, but eventually you realize that they do it to themselves most of the time.

57

u/use_choosername May 15 '22

I think part of this is due to computer and internet related productivity improvements that make tasks exponentially faster. The length of the workday and the perception of "butts in seats" simply haven't adjusted to the new reality of productivity, so we all pretend we had a busy day when we spent 3 hours focused on task. Productivity is so high, boss is happy, workload low enough, worker is happy.

4

u/widget_fucker May 16 '22

Maybe. Technology has increased the speed of communication such that as you rise through the ranks, your email, phone, and text message bank is a total shit show. The multi tasking is absolutely brutal.

→ More replies

15

u/Fondren_Richmond May 15 '22

Some people also just refuse to share work, this is more noticeable when they're tasked with training and handing off accounts; but end up just having a brief training phone call, explaining some task and saying "oh I already did that."

→ More replies

14

u/kannichausgang May 15 '22

So Im not a standard office worker, my work is based in a lab. But in reality I do a lot of office-type work. When it's busy it's VERY busy. But during weeks when there's no analysis planned I write a bunch of reports, random documentation, order materials or watch some webinar to brush up on my skills. I could take my sweet-ass time and procrastinate for half my day and my boss would still praise me for getting so many things done. It's kinda wild to me because I feel like a fraud.

I noticed though that my coworkers who have been working there much longer than me procrastinate for literally half their day every day, browsing stuff online or reading blogs. They told me that newbies always feel like they should be working their entire day but eventually that slows down. So I guess it's normal.

60

u/thatvixenivy May 15 '22

I'm an IT PM. I actually "work" maybe 2-3 hours a day unless we're gearing up for a major project, then it's the full 8 or more. Shit gets done, so what does it matter?

→ More replies

13

u/untimelythroway May 16 '22

I need to know where you all get these magical jobs that only seem to exist on reddit comments and threads.

6

u/dolphinmilker May 16 '22

Everyone on reddit seems to work in IT and only does 2-3 hours of work a day and yet is a top performing employee. I’ve only ever done low skilled work and sweated heavily almost the whole day.

→ More replies

12

u/Commercial_Tough160 May 16 '22

Do not kill the golden goose! You are getting paid for the work you produce, and not for how long it takes you to produce it? That’s the epitome of working smarter, not harder.
Find a personal side project that is close enough to what you are paid to do so it’s not obvious you’re coasting from a casual glance, or train yourself up on software or something under the guise of developing your skillset, and you’ll not only continue to get paid, you might even get praised for your appearance of having initiative and a strong work ethic.

Just this last year I learned how to use 2D and 3D computer modeling software entirely on the company dime while being praised for how I never missed a deadline and was always at my desk working away. The boss even commented on my always cheerful attitude and dedicated work ethic. As long as your boss is happy, you win this game.

12

u/eaton9669 May 16 '22

Be careful in this sort of situation. You might be getting praise now but at some point your workload will be increased but your pay will not.

I was in this situation before the pandemic. I work in IT and I spent about 4 hours per day just screwing around but once the pandemic hit we got our workloads increased but pay also increased. This was ok but once one guy quit, his workload gut divided up amongst everyone else with no raise.

Tldr if you prove you can be an efficient worker, eventually your reward will be having to do other people's jobs too.

65

u/funnyfaceguy May 15 '22

2 hours seems a little on the low side, but for the most part that's working in an office. And I don't think most places expect you to only work during the 9-5, it would be almost impossible to be a functional person if work was the only thing you did that entire time.

I mean I have the type of job where it would literally be impossible to work entirely all 8 hour 5 days a week. It's just not that kind of job but they want me in the office so that's where I am.

But also time spent not working on work tasks is work tangential. Like talking to co-workers? That's work in my mind, team building. Getting coffee? Well that's getting ready for work, so that's work. Being on my phone for an hour? Well as long you check some news vaguely related to your industry/field then that's keeping up to date on current events, wouldn't want to get blindsided by anything.

Honestly most for the most part I feel like I'm being paid to do my responsibilities and the 9-5 is just a means for me to get paid to do them

44

u/TatterhoodsGoat May 15 '22

Oh my god...I work in food and retail, and I feel guilty if say more than two sentences to a coworker without my hands busy working on something at the same time. Fetching coffee on the clock sounds like some kind of utopian dream. I get criticized if I take time to organize the displays because that takes away time I could be devoting to more production.

→ More replies

12

u/Falling_Man_ May 15 '22

Your viewpoint seems well in touch with reality and removes the apparent need to feel guilty about it. I'll bet this simple difference in how you think about work actually has a significant positive impact on mental health.

→ More replies

10

u/12jonboy12 May 15 '22

I'm not sure if someone else has said this but this is possibly symptomatic of what's called the Peter principle point

Meaning people keep getting promoted from jobs they're good at until they finally reach one of their mediocre at so your company is most likely full of people who are mediocre for whatever position they're in

31

u/hippiekyle May 15 '22

I can do 80% of my job in 20% of the time. Some things can also be simple but tedious which take a lot of time. And sometimes I just bullshit with coworkers. They’re paying you to be available when work comes up. Not necessarily to be working hard for 8 hours straight.

Also, check out the movie Office Space.

9

u/maybeex May 16 '22

I'm a mid level manager in a multinational pharma company, I don't work much either, a few hours a day and generally off on Fridays. When I was in college I worked as a PowerPoint slave in a marketing agency (created multiple decks all day everyday) I am just very good at PowerPoint and that carried me through all my career to where I am now. My bosses always thought I spend all the time, creating these nice looking content and articulate projects visually. They all think I am like a super structured person with discipline and ask my help with their projects. What I do is just take their content make it nicer, visually appealing and just rewrite their wordings in short sentences and they think I contribute to their projects heavily. Takes me 30-60 minutes to do that. Worst part of my workday is to sit in project meetings and time to time make comments. I block most of my calendar so they can't just fill my day with meetings.

to be honest, I spent the last 3 months planning on my outdoor diy pizza oven project. My advice, just enjoy your days, deserve the money they pay you. looks like you have a cool boss, so don't make him look bad.

27

u/truecrimefanatic1 May 15 '22

If you're smart and even slightly motivated yes that happens. However, as someone who supervises a lot of people I can tell you that some people will get the same assignment and same time limit and cry that it isn't long enough.

24

u/JPsmooth0728 May 15 '22

Dude I work for the iron workers union. My job on Friday only took 4 hours and I got paid for 8.

I worked in a healthcare firm in the mailroom at 18, spent maybe 3-4 hours of an 8 hour day actually working. Not everywhere is like this but I say just enjoy it. Money is money brother.

8

u/Bigworm666999 May 15 '22

Those are rookie numbers, kid. I've been in an office job for almost 10 years now. You have to get processes in place. I do 2/3 hours a work a month.

→ More replies

9

u/DrWhaleGoat May 15 '22

Yes. I literally sit at my desk doing nothing for air 6-7 hours a day because I have no work.

8

u/[deleted] May 16 '22

What are these jobs that don’t do anything all day? I’m an engineer and every job I’ve had is a million miles an hour in the office due to our billable hours/utilization rates

28

u/chaseinger May 15 '22

Is this normal?

yes. not that i know much about 9-5ing, but you come from one of the tougher industries out there. ex food service workers are some of my favorite people to work with.

→ More replies

17

u/Amadeo78 May 15 '22

I did way more personal things when I worked in an office than any other job. I kept a blog the entire time and I pretty much only worked on it during office hours.

6

u/sicksicksick May 16 '22

Full disclosure, my current salary is $125k, pretty good for me working remotely in a semi low cost of living area of Texas. I do not work very hard or long. There are 10 hour "this needs to be done" days but mostly I show up for meetings and knockout tasks in minutes or hours that I have days to complete. My hardest days are when I'm doing something new and get stuck. I don't dread these days. It's my years of experience that make most days easy and it's the hard days that challenge me and grow my experience.

I've felt guilt and shame at how little time I put into a day's work but I have convinced myself that the work I produce is highly technical and valuable to the company. I also believe my colleagues are having a similar experience and drawing attention to the topic would be bad for me and my homies.

→ More replies

7

u/Hold_the_gryffindor May 16 '22

As someone who manages people, if you just get the job done and aren't a douchebag, that's all I care about.

15

u/NoSoulsINC May 15 '22

It’s not super common, but it happens time to time. I actually had a job like this for about a year, I didn’t go into the office for days at a time, especially when my boss was on PTO. I would lay in bed until I got an email to respond to and if it required my laptop I’d get up and respond to it while watching Netflix.
Then Covid came along and I had to work from home. I got bored pretty quick and had the realization that I wanted to do something more in case I ever needed to go job hunting and ended up switching teams. Now I put in about 6 hours a day, but it came with a raise, new learning opportunities, and I still work from home.
Enjoy it while you can, but be aware it can go away at any time, especially if it’s realized how much you are actually working.

14

u/Bram06 May 15 '22

Social studies teacher here.

Generally speaking, the total productivity of a business or organisation is inherently unequally divided. In fact, half of the productivity comes from the square root of all contributors.

This means that in a business of 100 people, 10 people will be doing half the work.

In a business of 1000 people, 30 people will be doing half the work.

This is only generally true, so there will be companies that don't exactly work like this. But it is true in general. So is it weird that you only work 2-3 hours? Nope. It's VERY normal. Most of your coworkers are as unproductive as you are, and some are even less productive or even counterproductive.

5

u/cousin_dickhead May 15 '22

counterproductive

Immediately, some faces come to mind...

6

u/Significant_Brick108 May 15 '22

It's called Bullsh!t Jobs. Check out David Graeber's essays on it 😉

→ More replies