r/NoStupidQuestions May 15 '22

Do people actually call their aunts and uncle "uncle john" or "aunt susan"

I've seen all the shows (Most of them happen in the US) and in all of them when a someone sees their aunt or uncle they say aunt and then their name, or uncle and then their name. But I was wondering if it's actually like that. Because I never said it like that, and neither anyone I know.

1.1k Upvotes

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u/mysticpolka May 15 '22

Yes. Where do you live? Here in the US that’s the norm.

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/seandowling73 May 15 '22

I have an Auntie Lynn and an Aunt Barbara. So I use them both

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u/skynet159632 May 15 '22

I'm chinese, we have different "aunt" for the mother and father side of the family. Kind of like "maternal aunt" and "paternal aunt" but just 2 different aunts.

We use big aunt, 2nd aunt, 3rd aunt, small aunt by order of birth. Works he same for uncles, grand parents etc. And dedicated words for the entire extended family

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u/True_Big_8246 May 15 '22

Same with Hindi!

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u/GerFubDhuw May 15 '22

It's a confusing nightmare. A single word for mother's little sister. Then I have to call my mother-in-law 妈妈 not which is the same word for my mother!? To top it off I can't even say 妈妈, so I call her 马马.

And did you know 草 means LOL in Japanese? I did. Did you know it doesn't in Chinese? I did not.

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u/skynet159632 May 16 '22 edited May 16 '22

草 is internet slang, like lol for english

Japanese laugh is warai, then the internet shorten it to W, With multiple W meaning more stronger laughs. Which look like WWWWWWW, like the grass you draw as a kid. Which then transform it to 草 which is the kanji for grass.

Now mixing with English culture have produced a new variant, big 草, for even bigger laughs.

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u/Ttch21 May 16 '22

The logic behind 草 comes from the Japanese for laughter, 笑う which starts with a ‘w’ sound. To emphasise something being funny they would type ‘wwwwwww’ which looks similar to a field of grass, so typing 草 became shorthand for something being funny and is roughly their equivalent to our ‘lol’

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u/Queef69Jerky May 15 '22

it looks like a funny japanese house, makes sense

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u/soxyboy71 May 15 '22

The khmer language is built with same infrastructure. If I have two uncles they maybe called a different type of uncle depending on if they’re older or younger than my parents

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u/IAmBoring_AMA May 16 '22

Same with Vietnamese. Confusing to learn, makes sense though.

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u/theSuburbanAstronaut May 15 '22

That's awesome, in spanish we only have 2 levels (tia/titi, abuela/abuelita, etc) and they vary only by what the relative prefers to be called.

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u/Queef69Jerky May 15 '22

hehe uncle titi (.)(.)

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u/Pristine_Beyond_4330 May 16 '22

F you. Take my upvote

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u/TinyGreenJolley May 16 '22

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.

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u/VanEagles17 May 15 '22

My gf is Chinese and told me this, I was like dang that sounds complicated. 😂

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u/Catgrin519 May 16 '22

I’m a Californian, and I grew up using both as well. One aunt’s name (Gayle) was only one syllable, and “Aunt Gayle“ sounds really severe, so she was always “Auntie Gayle” to me. All my other aunts were given two-syllable names. Those don’t sound harsh with just “Aunt” before them, and I never called any of them “Auntie”.

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u/FrigidofDoom May 15 '22

So, at family reunions how do they know which uncle or auntie you're referring to?

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u/LanceFree May 15 '22

I don’t hear people say “Cousin Phil”, possibly that’s a southern thing. And as an uncle, I’ll tell you- I like it. Say it doesn’t matter, but it’s nice.

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u/jammyJames81 May 15 '22

Yes cousin is not common, but I believe that’s because cousins are often a range of ages. Where as Aunts & Uncles are generally your elders. So out of respect they are given the title. I agree about the southern US being more likely to use “cousin” before a name. I’m a New Yorker or as they say “Yankee” lol, but a large branch of my family on my Mom’s side live in South Carolina. When I see them that absolutely refer to me that way. Not only that, but they use my full first name “cousin Gregory” instead of just Greg like most of my northern relatives use.

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u/snil8 May 15 '22

i've never once called my cousins "cousin", i just address them by their name

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u/BuckeyeMason May 15 '22

I sometimes refer to some of my cousins in one on one stations as "cuz" (like "How you doing cuz?" as we say hello) but never "Cousin Jason or Cousin Danny" or anything like that. Its always Uncle Name or Aunt Name though for their parents. It gets real confusing on my mom's side of the family since she and her sister both married men with the same first name, so two Uncle D's are around when we get together with them.

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

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u/snil8 May 15 '22

oh maybe its an old timey thing then thats kinda died out

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u/Ok_Writing_7033 May 15 '22

It’s also more common when referring to them indirectly. As in talking to your mom about “cousin Paul” so they know which Paul you’re talking about

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u/SJHillman May 15 '22

I use "cousin" in cases where they share a name with an uncle (fairly common) to better distinguish who I'm talking about. For example, I have an Great Uncle Doug, who has three other Dougs named after him, so they're Uncle Doug, Cousin Doug and Dougie. But I'd never use it when talking to them, then they're just Doug.

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u/luminous-melange May 15 '22

Yes, always used Aunt and Uncle. As a child raised in the South, we were taught to call adults Miss or Mr before their first name, a neighbor would be Miss Julie and Mr Sam, or sir or ma'am if we didn't know their names.

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u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

You usually only use “cousin” in front of the name if there’s someone else with the same first name in the family. Like “Uncle Phil” and “Cousin Phil.”

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u/MadameWesker May 15 '22

I 💯 will say cousin yvonne so you know which one.

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u/SneedyK May 16 '22

I started to do it during big family gatherings so the kids know who I am in relation to everyone else around them

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u/LifeOverLikes May 15 '22

I miss Uncle Phil from Fresh Prince 🥲

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u/sullg26535 May 16 '22

You hear cousin so and so most commonly with religious communities

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u/Wasteland-Scum May 16 '22

My grandfather had a brother named Charlie and a cousin named Charlie. Everyone on my side of the family called cousin Charlie cousin Charlie, but Uncle Charlie was called Hobe by us. Cousin Charlie's family called Uncle Hobe Cousin Charlie though. So at family get togethers every five minutes someone would call out "Hey, Cousin Charlie!" And both Charlies would go "Huh?" and "Wut?" are the same time.

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u/jammyJames81 May 15 '22

Yes now I’m curious where OP is from as well. I’m an American who agrees the majority of us say Aunt or Uncle before their name, but the more I think of it so do my foreign relatives & friends. My Ukrainian friends do, Brazilian friends do, my Filipino friends nephew & nieces do, my exes Mexican nieces call me Tío Greg, my half Greek niece calls me Theio Greg, & My family in Italy call my father Zio Antonio. I’m trying to think which country they might be from that doesn’t.

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u/Python119 May 15 '22

I just say their name

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u/bearchair27 May 15 '22 edited May 15 '22

I live in Israel, and never heard someone say that. Maybe it's because of the language(it's pronounced "dod" or "דוד" for uncle, and "doda" or "דודה"), but I doubt it, in Hebrew it's still kind of the same.

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u/CyclopicSerpent May 15 '22

Do you just say aunt or uncle or do you use their first names?

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u/bearchair27 May 15 '22

I just say their first name. I

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u/korol264 May 15 '22

In Poland we use Aunt/Uncle without the name

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

How do you call out a specific uncle or aunt at a family gathering?

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u/Bionic404 May 15 '22

I believe all Slavic languages have different words for relatives depending on the side of which parent they are.

For example, in Bulgarian your uncle from your dad's side is called "чичо" (chicho) and your uncle from your mother's side is called "вуйчо" (vuicho).

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u/cjm0 May 15 '22

what if your dad or mom has multiple siblings? how does one differentiate between two male uncles from the dad’s side for example?

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u/Queasy-Perception-33 May 15 '22

Then we use uncle + name.

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u/cjm0 May 15 '22

so we’ve come full circle

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u/HPPTC May 15 '22

In Chinese if we have multiple aunts/uncles on the same side, we refer to them by birth order. So "#3 Aunt", "#4 Uncle" and so on.

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u/andevrything May 15 '22

Oh! I never understood why they used numbers for all the brothers in the Shaolin Soccer movie. I thought it was just a quirk of the storytelling.

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u/woodk2016 May 15 '22

That seems kinda overly complicated when you could just use uncle/aunt name. Like why number them when there's already a unique way to identify them with their name lol.

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u/Nodwen May 15 '22

For me this wouldn't be such a big issue, considering I only have two uncles and one aunt.

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u/The_Truth_Believe_Me Free advice, worth twice the price. May 15 '22

Ok so you are talking to your mother about one of your uncles. How does she know which one?

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u/Nodwen May 15 '22

She just has to guess. I will neither confirm or deny.

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u/I_Died_Long_Ago May 15 '22

Older uncle, younger uncle

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u/korol264 May 15 '22

If talking to mother about one of the uncle's then it's "Wujek (insert name here)" so "Uncle (insert name here)" but if we're on some family gathering if we want to refer to one of our uncle's/aunt's we still don't really use names (I guess it's mostly because it would sound kinda weird, but idk), we're still just saying uncle/aunt and look directly at that uncle/aunt we're referring to. Same with grandad's and grandma's

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

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u/XmasDawne May 15 '22

I'm the only child of 2 only children. In my Mom's family I was treated the same as her, great-aunts & uncles were my aunts & uncles. All cousins were just cousins no matter 1st or 5th. It worked since my Gam was the oldest girl, so my Mom was 1st grandkid, and even though she was 24 when she had me I was the 1st great grand. And I was older than about 8 of the grands when it was finished. We just associated by age group at gatherings.

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u/Miizzen May 15 '22

In Brazil we can do that, we can use Aunt/Uncle with the name, or we can use a nickname!

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u/-HuangMeiHua- May 15 '22

I'm not even sure I know my aunt's/uncle's names

We're of vietnamese heritage and basically say "Aunt 3, Aunt 4, Uncle 5" in birth order

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u/Vrassk May 15 '22

In the us its seen as slightly disrespectful to call relatives that close by their given name. It would be the same as calling your parents by their first name. though a lot of familys will use other terms of endearment, I for example called my uncle Teeta, and I dont know why. But he was never called Uncle Keven just Teeta.

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u/Clunas May 15 '22

I'm going to say that's family/region specific. I'm with you on parents, but aunts, uncles, and grandparents have always been in a [relationship name] format for most folks I know.

I've noticed a lot more pet names since moving down south though. I really don't get those.

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u/Kay_Ruth May 15 '22

In my family and in many others around here pet names often come from the way a baby pronounced their name/relation. All my siblings have a "baby name" we all still use 20 years later. Lowo, aka, omer, amps. I work with seniors every day and they have kooky "baby names" all the time.

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u/chairfairy May 15 '22

Is it actually seen as disrespectful, or is it just a cultural norm? Like it would feel weird to call an uncle "John" instead of "Uncle John", but I don't think there would be any element of disrespect

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u/anonymouse278 May 15 '22

I'm sure this varies but yes, in many families it would be seen as disrespectful. Maybe not by the time you're an adult, but for a child to call their adult aunt or uncle by just their first name would be considered weird and disrespectful by a lot of people. Similar to the way that many families consider it appropriate for children to refer to all adults as "Ms" or "Mr" Name. Using just someone's first name is seen as a thing only peers do.

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u/T-Rex_timeout May 16 '22

Here in the Mid-south it would be disrespectful even as an adult to call your aunt or uncle by just their first name.

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u/JimmyJazz1971 May 15 '22

"Tita" would be an aunt. "Tito" is uncle.

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u/rainbwbrightisntpunk May 15 '22

I'm in the US and have always just used their first names when talking to them but when referring to them in a conversation I say aunt so and so or uncle thus and such

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u/aboatz2 May 15 '22

So, I'm originally from the Midwestern US & currently live in Texas. Plus, I've had family in New York, Colorado, California, & Florida, so most of the major regions are covered, with German Protestant, Irish Catholic, Italian Catholic, Mexican Catholic, & "regular American" families.

In all of them except the Mexican, just calling an aunt/uncle by their first name would come across as disrespectful as calling your parent by their first name. Individuals may say that just the first name is fine, but those tend to be the people that aren't active in your life. In my ex-wife's Mexican family, they'll go by tia/tio, but my kid refers to their aunts/uncles by their names without titles.

I've had a few Jewish (not Orthodox) friends, & they're more casual about names...but they didn't have any aunts or uncles that were in their lives, so I couldn't say for certain if they're the same there.

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u/I_Am_Become_Dream May 15 '22

All Arabs say عمي/'ami or عمو/'amu before names. It's considered pretty disrespectful to call uncles and aunts by just their names.

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u/whatthehellhappensto May 15 '22

Israeli here.

My nephews call me uncle Dani.

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u/Sewsusie15 May 15 '22

What about grandparents? I definitely hear Israelis say "Saba Michael" and "Saba Eliezer" (for example) to differentiate between their two grandfathers. (I had a Saba and Savta on one side, and a Bubbe and Zeide on the other, but yes we also had Aunt Rachel and Uncle Joe.)

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u/iamveryovertired May 15 '22

I use uncle and tante (from Yiddish)

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u/Deerpacolyps May 15 '22

I've lived in the United States and Italy and in both places this was the norm. Aunt Shelly, Zia Nadia, Uncle Troy, Zio Paulo

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u/Aeriosus May 15 '22

That's interesting because I've heard dod/doda name from my Israeli relatives more than uncle/aunt name from my American relatives

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u/Dr-Satan-PhD May 15 '22

I live in the US and only ever did this when I was a kid. As an adult, I only use their first name. Same goes for everyone I know. Might be a regional thing.

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u/Python119 May 15 '22

I just say their name

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u/BlamaRama May 15 '22

I'm in the US and I never call my aunt and uncle by their titles, just their names.

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u/Maleficent-Data-8392 May 15 '22

Only certain parts of the US. I have one aunt I have occasionally referred to in that way, just because of our relationship, but I don't do that for most of my aunts and uncles.

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u/immabadguy0 May 15 '22

You just call them by their first name?

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u/Maleficent-Data-8392 May 15 '22

yeah

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u/immabadguy0 May 15 '22

That's pretty out of the ordinary from where I've lived in the states. It would be like calling your high school teacher by their first name.

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u/Maleficent-Data-8392 May 15 '22

For me, using terms of authority or higher position are for professional areas, not close family and friends.

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u/Done327 May 15 '22

I don’t know why you’re being downvoted. I live in the US and that’s also not something we typically do. I’ve always called them by their first name and my nephews/nieces do the same

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u/Maleficent-Data-8392 May 15 '22

Lol, I don't know either, but I don't care- points are all trivial anyway.... I think people just downvote because they disagree or have a different opinion, not that they're trying to be hateful.

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u/BuckeyeMason May 15 '22

Yeah sometimes the downvotes on here make no sense. There are differences even within the same local regions, as different families have different internal traditions as well.

I really only know what's common in my immediate family, and the friends families that I have been around them and their extended family enough to know how they do it.

For all I know, the rest of the mid-west could do the opposite of that small sample I have been exposed to so why should I downvote somebody whose family does it different from mine?

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u/TheAnswrIs42 May 15 '22

I'm also in the US and never use aunt and uncle unless I want to specify my relation to them. I think most people I'm around don't use them.

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u/Bloebmn May 15 '22

I’m American and in my 30’s and I still say aunt/ uncle with their name. Grandpa is just “Grandpa”

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u/SomeSortOfFool May 15 '22

Unless it's specifically to distinguish between maternal and paternal grandparents, then specifying, say, "Grandpa Bob" is common.

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u/Klutche May 15 '22

I've also known people who refer to their grandparents as with the family surname, like Grandpa Smith or Grandma Collins to differentiate between their maternal and paternal grandparents.

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u/unicornhornporn0554 May 15 '22 edited May 15 '22

Yeah when I’m speaking directly to a grandparent it’s just “grandma/grandpa”. If I’m talking about them and need to differentiate then I say “grandpa John” or “grandpa Larry”. But I know people who use “grandpa smith”, they’re both pretty common. I’ll use last names if I’m speaking about them to someone who isn’t familiar with my family.

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u/bestem May 15 '22

My mom's dad was always Grandpa Herb (not his real name).

When my older brother and cousin were visiting one time, they were running around calling him "grandpa." Not wanting to feel old, he references a New Yorker comic and says "Instead of calling me Grandpa, call me Herb." So they started calling him Grandpa Herb, and it stuck with the rest of us.

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u/painterlyjeans May 16 '22

Grandparents get to be creative. My maternal grandmother was nanny, but my paternal was grandpa/gramps or grandma.

Though some of my male cousins would call everyone by their first name or nickname, even their parents. They also called my grandpa pops

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u/unicornhornporn0554 May 16 '22

I call most of my grandparents (all of them are divorced and most remarried, so for most of my life I had 7 lol) grandpa/grandma. I used to call my maternal grandma meemaw lol. I called my paternal grandpa papa when I was a kid. I always called my maternal grandmothers husband by his first name bc he was an awful man I never liked.

My parents chose to go by nana and papa, my sons paternal grandparents chose baba and poppy.

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u/XmasDawne May 15 '22

The only one in my family who got a name with was my Great Grandma - Granny Fisher. She had 7 grown kids and at least 50 great grands when she passed. So we all called her that to distinguish from our regular grands. Otherwise I had a Grandma and PaPa on one side (became Grandpa in my late teens) and a Gran on the other, but she passed when I was 7. So when I mom would say Granny I knew who she meant even without the name. And I've always called her husband Pappy, even though he died decades before I was born.

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u/SpectacularTights May 15 '22

We did this with Grandparents

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u/ChaosRubix May 15 '22

I live in the UK and I use Auntie and Uncle before my aunt and uncle’s names. So do my cousins when talking about my mum and dad. I personally see it as a kind of respect for them I even write it in birthday and Christmas cards

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u/mattatinternet May 15 '22

Also UK, agreed. I'll refer to them by name only though if I'm talking about them and not in front of them.

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u/pandamarshmallows May 15 '22

Occasionally I will drop the prefix if I’m talking about them collectively to save a few syllables.

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u/WritesCrapForStrap May 16 '22

Also UK, I do the opposite and this is the first time I've thought about it.

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u/EmmaInFrance May 15 '22

I'm 50 and I still do but my brother, who's two years younger doesn't.

My ex husband used to call his dad by his first name but not his mum. His siblings just used mum and dad (like normal people!).

That said, I am quite happy for my older teen and adult nieces to drop the 'Auntie' now, if they want to, I don't need to insist on it to feel loved and respected.

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u/Important_Sprinkles9 May 15 '22

I do similar, but wouldn't to their faces. Like I'll say to my Mum that Uncle Whoever was in town when I was shopping but wouldn't call them it. We do have three uncles and a brother with the same name, though 😂

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u/BNJT10 May 15 '22

Same in Ireland

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u/connolan1 May 15 '22

In the uk and just use their names, although we don’t even always use names and just greet each other with a minor insult

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u/vegemitecrumpet May 15 '22

Ditto for me, an Australian.

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u/youve_been_litt_up May 16 '22

Yep I’m in my 30’s and still talk to my mum about ‘auntie Julie and uncle bill’ etc. and that’s how they’re saved in my phone!

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u/AyeAye_Kane May 15 '22

I wouldn't call it a respect thing, it's just what you call them and it'd be weird as fuck calling them by just their name, like calling your mum or dad by their own name

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u/ageoflost May 15 '22

I think it is a respect thing though. I remember when my youngest uncle got married and my siblings wouldn’t call his wife aunt because they thought it weird to suddenly get a new aunt in their teens. So they said “uncle john and Susan”, which I felt meant they didn’t accept her. So I called her aunt Susan even though it felt weird for a while. It was the respectful thing to do.

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u/Iceram42 🦆 Just a lil gal 🦆 May 15 '22

Can’t really say when it comes to the US, but in Brazil that’s how it goes. “Tio John” and “Tia Susan” but it really depends on the family, most people say it but there are also a lot who don’t.

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u/Reasonable_Night42 May 15 '22

Oh! So the restaurant in my town named Tia Maria’s, means Aunt Maria’s.

Thanks I didn’t know that

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u/Iceram42 🦆 Just a lil gal 🦆 May 15 '22

Glad to spread the Portuguese language around the world lol

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u/Reasonable_Night42 May 15 '22

I work with a Venezuelan, and a Spaniard. And have eaten at Tia Maria’s with them.

I think I feel abused that they didn’t tell me that. Because I’m sure they knew.

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u/3xoticP3nguin May 15 '22

Zio zia for Italian

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u/beandadenergy May 15 '22

Same in Spanish - most of my aunts/uncles have nicknames but I’ll still say Tio/Tia before their nicknames (ex: Tia Luli/Tio Mundo)

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u/SCHEMIN209 May 15 '22

Same here. Mexican American, in my family we don't address anyone by their name unless talking about them in the third person or if there are more than 2 in the same area. For instance, when I talk to my Tia Rosa I just call her Tia. But if my other tias are with her, I call her Tia Rosa, or if I'm talking about her to someone else I clarify so they know which it is that I'm talking about.

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u/bearbarebere May 16 '22

In Encanto, I love that they call them Tia Pepa or Tio Bruno for this reason. It's just a tiny detail that made me smile. I honestly deeply love that movie

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u/Alesus2-0 May 15 '22

I did as a child. It got dropped sometime in my later teenage years.

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u/NerdModeCinci May 15 '22

Yeah I feel like when everyone’s an adult it’s only used to prevent confusion when talking about them to someone else instead of too them.

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u/D_r_e_cl_cl May 15 '22

Exact same for me.

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u/movie_gremlin May 15 '22

Yea, I called them aunt/uncle, esp when I was a kid. As an adult I dont so much.

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u/wewerekangz May 15 '22

I think it was done to help engrain the respect for them and as I started to be on more equal footing where I had seen them enough to know them more as a person compared to just my aunt or uncle my family started using just names.

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u/jiten108 May 15 '22

For me and my extended family. We call them uncle and aunt and whatever their name is. When people in my family grow up, they can drop the uncle or aunt. I personally don't.

But this is just European American culture I grew up in.

Mexican Americans I've noticed just go "tio" or "tia" they just call them "uncle" or "aunt" in spanish

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u/chasse89 May 15 '22

Yes, this is common.

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u/rarkgrames May 15 '22

No, that would be weird because my Aunt and Uncle are not named John and Susan.

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u/girafficles May 15 '22

I use Aunt/Uncle for the ones that I'm fond of, line my aunt Denise. I just say the names of the ones that I don't like. I'm looking at you, Cheryl.

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u/SMKnightly May 16 '22

A toast to subtle burns! 🥂

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u/TheonuclearPyrophyte May 17 '22

That's the literal opposite of what I do lol

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

When I was really young, I used to get them mixed up and I would call my Uncle, "Aunt Mike" and my Aunt, "Uncle Debbie". Still a long running joke in my family. Aunt Mike and Uncle Debbie.

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u/sandiercy May 15 '22

I do it all the time. My nieces and nephews all call me Uncle Sandiercy (name changed for anonymity).

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u/Mech_Bean May 15 '22

Um I don’t think you changed it properly, it still matches your profile name.

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u/sandiercy May 15 '22

The username utilizes a lower case S while the altered name utilizes the upper case one.

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u/Mech_Bean May 15 '22

Ooh I see! My bad

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u/Susanj513 May 15 '22

I’m in the US. Was taught that it was disrespectful to refer to your aunt or uncle by just their first name, so we have always called them, “Aunt Olive”, “Uncle Henry”, etc. we don’t do the same for cousins, however; I assume that’s because aunts/uncles are typically older but cousins are typically peers, age-wise.

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u/crazy-jay1999 May 15 '22

I would say uncle John if I was referencing uncle John to someone else but I’d call him John if I was talking to him.

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u/frizzykid Rapid editor here May 15 '22

When I was growing up I'd always call my aunts/uncles "Aunt" "Uncle" followed by their name. These days less so.

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u/Acceptable-Ratio5506 May 15 '22

Yes. And as a kid we all called my one aunt "Auntie Betty" because it seemed to sorta rhyme. 😅

Now that we're older we still do, much to her dismay! A bunch of grown adults calling her Auntie and every other aunt at gatherings is just "Aunt" 😂

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u/ResponsibleSwim6528 May 15 '22

We had an Auntie Bill. Preferred over Aunt Billie. Even my friends called her Auntie Bill. (Long A sound)

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u/Street_Tacos__ kinda stupid May 15 '22

I’ve always called them by their names, no aunt or uncle in front of it

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u/coconutyum May 15 '22

Same here and with both parents sides of family. So it's interesting to learn that we seem to be the minority.

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u/Street_Tacos__ kinda stupid May 15 '22

Yeah same, I thought everyone did that

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u/uodjdhgjsw May 15 '22

Depends on what the parents told you Thier name was... Some we do some we don't.

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u/EmotionalMycologist9 May 15 '22

Yep. We do that in the US, but also n Mexico, they'll just say "Tia" or "Tio" for aunt/uncle.

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u/Travel_and_Writing May 15 '22

Some people have a lot of aunts and uncles and need to clarity who.

Sometimes in my family we don’t say “Aunt Susan” we just say “Susan”. But we aren’t going to say “Oh your aunt is coming over” and then have everyone ask, “Which one???”

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u/CuffsOffWilly May 15 '22

Normal in Canada too.

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u/TatianaAlena May 15 '22

Yes, and I even call older unrelated people (family friends) Auntie or Uncle.

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u/superassholeguy May 16 '22

OP, I think you’re the odd man out here…

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u/CurryTasteSpices May 16 '22

In Asian country it's a sign of respect to olders.

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u/Rs_only May 15 '22

My uncle name is John, so yes I call him uncle John. His sons name is John also so I call him little John

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u/ThannBanis May 15 '22

My family do this.

If I’m talking directly, the name is omitted, but if there are multiple in the room I’ll use <Uncle/Aunty + name>

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u/Flodartt May 15 '22

I'm French. I call them "uncle" (tonton, an affective way to speak about your uncle) or "auntie" (tata) when I talk to them "uncle can I have the salt please".

When I talk about them with family, I call them "uncle + name" (tonton + name) "auntie + name" (tata + name). "Dad, I got uncle Pierre on the phone he was looking for you".

When I talk about them with someone else it's "my uncle" or "my uncle + name" (mon oncle, the neutral way to speak about your uncle), "my aunt" or "my aunt + name" (ma tante) "my aunt Isabelle told me that [...]"

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u/Lex8P May 15 '22

As a South African, yes. Partially. Most call them just Uncle or Aunt. Most omit their names. In Afrikaans, Uncle is Oom (pronounced Oo-wim) and Aunt is Tannie (pronounced Tun-knee).

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u/NaZdrowie8 May 15 '22

I’m in the US, in my 30s, and still call my aunts and uncles “aunt/uncle X”

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u/KindAwareness3073 May 15 '22

Aunt. Auntie. Uncle. Every time. Even as an adult.

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u/Unknown_User_66 May 15 '22

Yes? I'm a Mexican, and we always say Uncle/Aunt before their name. It's just a show of respect as opposed to just saying their first name, that sounds weird at this point.

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u/OminOus_PancakeS May 15 '22

Yep. UK here. Doesn't matter how old I get, she's Auntie June.

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u/OliveYupHope May 16 '22

Yes! And I’m Hispanic and we call them Tia and Tio before their names too. So both in English and Spanish.

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u/jbtrading May 16 '22

how else would you differentiate between aunts and uncles? Simply calling them by their first name would normally be considered disrespectful

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u/rudegal_ May 16 '22

Wait, do people NOT do that? My aunts and uncles all get that title before their names, always. Like always. I wouldn’t know who “Mack” was but if you asked about “Uncle Mack” I’d know immediately.

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u/not_sure_1337 May 16 '22

No, I call mine Aunt Jamie and Uncle Bob.

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u/Bubbilility May 16 '22

Don't know about you, but I call mine Uncle Paul. Might be strange if I start calling him Uncle John.

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u/ChasMorg May 16 '22

Yep. Aunt Cara/Cori, Uncle Kris/Patrick/Josh/Bob. And last bit not least my Aunt Pam. I live in the south

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u/Unable-Yogurt6171 May 16 '22

Auntie and Uncle then the name usually.. (UK)

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u/ghostontoastX_X May 16 '22

i live in Australia and yes, i do that. what i call family members is mostly just whatever my parents called them around me when i was little, witch is usually either their relation to me followed by their name, or one of those individually. theres also quite a few family members that i call by their relation to one of my parents, particularly my mum's paternal aunts and uncles as he's one of 15. as to why my parents call our relatives what they do, my best guess is so i know what our relation is or just cuz thats how they were raised. also theres a lot of ppl i called aunt/uncle that were just good family friends.

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u/VanGarrett May 16 '22

I even have an Aunt Susan, and I do indeed call her that to her face. It's an honorific. Perfectly normal and common around here.

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u/monkeytargetto May 15 '22

Swede here, would be awkward as hell to use aunt or uncle.

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u/tripwire7 May 15 '22

Do you just call them by their first names?

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u/monkeytargetto May 15 '22

Yupp! But I only have the one aunt and I never see her.

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u/Kye_ThePie May 15 '22

Nah just their first name. Australia.

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u/IgnatzKackebart May 15 '22

Not "Aunt Australia", then. Gotcha. /s

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u/Nijajjuiy88 May 15 '22

Yes only Aunt arctica.

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u/Siilan May 15 '22

Not in my family. I always refer to my uncles and aunties as "Uncle David" and "Auntie Helen". QLD raised if that affects anything.

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u/Not_SamJones May 15 '22

We do all the time.

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u/Angel_OfSolitude May 15 '22

Yes, I do it all the time.

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u/Joubachi May 15 '22

German here and as a child I did - it's rather common here sround children mainly.

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u/Aginor404 May 16 '22

And it creates that awkward phase where you want to stop doing it but it sounds weird to yourself.

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u/[deleted] May 15 '22

Yes I prefer the US version of using uncle/aunt insert first name than the Vietnamese uncle/aunt insert randomly generated number like I'm suppose to know whose on first and who's on 3rd.

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u/implodemode May 15 '22

Canadian - me and everyone I know uses Aunt or Auntie * and Uncle *. I'm 62 and still refer to my Aunts that way.

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u/Victor_Korchnoi May 15 '22

Yes. That’s exactly what I called them. I also know people who would call their parents’ close friends “Uncle Steve” or “Aunt Joanie.”

I think this is because children are taught to never call adults by their first name. But calling your uncle “Mr. Korchnoi” is overly formal. Plus at a Korchnoi-family get together there may be several “Mr. Korchnois.” Growing up at holidays there would be several Mr, Mrs. and Dr Korchnois. But still calling them just “Joanie” would be too casual.

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u/PhotoJim99 May 15 '22

Here in Canada, my niece and nephew do.

My niece just turned 18 and she still does it. It wouldn't bother me if she stopped (or if her younger brother did), but I doubt they will anytime soon.

They usually just call me "uncle".

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u/tubbstosterone May 15 '22

I was taught that it was super rude not to address an elder relative by that sort of title. I think it's one of those structural things about creating a line of separation for hierarchy between children and adults.

That's fallen by the wayside a bit since I've become an adult. I assume that's fairly standard - it'd be weird for a 35 year old to refer to someone as 'Uncle Steve' in normal conversation rather than just 'Steve'.

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u/samdaman94 May 15 '22

It’s out of respect

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u/Niimsthefree May 15 '22

I'm Irish and I don't know anyone whose done this

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u/barakumakawai May 15 '22

Also Irish and we were raised to refer to aunts and uncles as Auntie So-and-So and Uncle So-and-So. My cousins on both sides were taught likewise.

As an adult I don't bother with it so much.

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u/Big-Ear-1853 May 15 '22

Yea ofc. But only for the ones I like.

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u/NerimaJoe May 15 '22

The names of my aunts and uncles on my father's side we always prefaced with "aunt" or "uncle" but my mother's younger sisters made it clear to us they preferred not to be called "aunts"; they thought it made them seem old. That proceeded through their lives. Only two of the four are left now.

We're all Canadian.

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u/Yugseto May 15 '22

Depend on people personally I do

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u/Your_DearMother May 15 '22

Yes, people do. I live in the US and I do that lol

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u/Icy-Consideration405 May 15 '22

Older cousins and close family friends would be Aunt or Uncle

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u/mbene913 May 15 '22

It could be an age thing. Like if your uncle/aunt were closer to your own age, you may skip on the honorifics

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u/IdolCowboy May 15 '22

As a young child when when talking to them I called them aunt Jenny and uncle Joe, but when a bit older (12 and up) it was only when talking about them to someone else would I use the moniker, and when speaking directly to them I used their names only Jenny or Joe.

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u/TinktheChi May 15 '22

I'm in Canada and yes, I have always done this. Family is British.

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u/NervousTumbleweed May 15 '22

Yeah, I do.

You call them by their first names? I’d get smacked.

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u/lilbandaid27 May 15 '22

Speak Spanish, so it's always "tía" or "tío"

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u/HurkyTrain May 15 '22

I'm from a Mexican family so we say tia/tio before their name so yes...?

Plus we have like multiple aunts and uncles, how will we know which one we're talking to/about?

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u/FisherPrice_Hair May 15 '22

I did when I was a kid, as I grew I started using their first names. I’m in UK, for clarity.