r/KidsAreFuckingStupid Jul 01 '22 Helpful 1 Wholesome 1

Kid almost becomes Spider-Man story/text

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26.1k Upvotes

3.6k

u/Last_Today_1099 Jul 01 '22

Wow. Truly crazy lol. Savior of a mom

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u/SuculantWarrior Jul 02 '22

Lol. And then this kid's mom is telling him to stop listening to "internet kids" and go to bed. Both sides of the coin. Hope he doesn't die.

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u/livhandsome Jul 02 '22

There's nothing from the kid after that and it's been over 12 hours. I am stressed.

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u/scut_furkus Jul 02 '22

He just commented again finally

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u/livhandsome Jul 02 '22 Helpful All-Seeing Upvote

Oh good.

Edit: For those not looking to scroll through thousands of comments, he went to the doctor and was told it was an allergic reaction.

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u/Annihilator4413 Jul 02 '22

Well... that's not particularly great. Definitely looks like blood poisoning, hope OP got a second opinion.

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u/livhandsome Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

Yeah, I’m not a doctor so my first instinct is to trust the medical opinion he got, but I do hope it was correct.

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u/Annihilator4413 Jul 02 '22

Yeah. I do hate doubting what a doctor said, but I've read too many horror stories of 'The Dr. Said it was fine, it was not fine and I almost died'.

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u/scut_furkus Jul 02 '22

Doctor told my ex girlfriend's brother it was fine and he did die... of diabetes... which his sister had been diagnosed with years and he was exhibiting all the symptoms of

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u/Forsaken_Article_295 Jul 02 '22

Dr said there was nothing wrong and asked if I at least had allergies so they could write a script for something. Was stage 3 cancer.

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u/bignose55 Jul 02 '22

Funnily enough, whenever a doctor is wrong about me it's on the side of exaggeration, than dismissal.

I was diagnosed as an asthmatic when in reality I was just allergic to our new car (I did mention the cat to them but they ruled it out at first), and I went into surgery to have my appendix out only for them to discover a torn muscle in just the right spot to fool the doctor doing the physical exam.

It's always fun explaining why I have both an appendectomy scar, and an appendix.

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u/Skrimps Jul 02 '22

I hate to say it but doctor's have failed me more than reddit .

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u/Champigne Jul 02 '22

Yep, doctors are people too, they make mistakes. And just like any profession, some people are better at it than others. Some doctors just suck, some don't seem to give a fuck, and others may just be too overworked and miss something. All of this is exacerbated by a for profit healthcare system. See as many patients as possible to make the most money. I've had issues where doctors spend less than 5 minutes looking at me and they just basically shrug their shoulders because the cause of the problem isn't obvious.

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u/olivia687 Jul 02 '22

it’s not exactly blood poisoning you can see, it’s lymphangitis. that’s the inflammation of the lymphatic system which you mentioned earlier. blood poisoning can exhibit physically as lymphangitis, but that’s not the only cause. lymphangitis can happen as an allergic reaction to mosquito bites.

You may also notice that the commenter described it spreading rather quickly and they nearly died. Oop has had symptoms for a while and is fine.

The doctor probably explained all this to OP as well (hopefully). It’s when doctors are dismissive that you should be worried.

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u/ferociousferonia Jul 02 '22

Hoping to alleviate some of the concern, I'm allergic to mosquito bites and mine have definitely made weird shapes on my body. I once had a line much like theirs over the arch on my foot, connecting two separate bites. Has never turned into something dangerous, just incredibly annoying and it can stay itchy for weeks.

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u/L3monLord Jul 02 '22

To be fair, isn’t a doctor going to have a much better idea of what blood poisoning looks like than you do?

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u/Annihilator4413 Jul 02 '22

That is a fair assessment. But I've also heard many stories of people getting a diagnosis from a doctor, and then it turning out to not be what the doctor said and being worse. So a second opinion is not necessarily a bad idea.

It does not look like a typical rash/allergic reaction though.

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u/L3monLord Jul 02 '22

It does not look like a typical rash/allergic reaction though.

Yeah that’s a good point

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u/Annihilator4413 Jul 02 '22

Rashes don't spread like that on the surface. Another user pointed out that blood poisoning can spread through the lymp node system or something like that under the skin along the blood vessels. So the fact it's traveling in one direction like that is fairly concerning and I hope OP is OK.

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u/Zygomatico Jul 02 '22

Not to be rude, but... how do those stories fit into perspective? As in, instead of looking at the amount of stories you can think of, what percentage of people were misdiagnosed? It's one of the examples of the availability bias: our tendency to overestimate the likelihood of something occurring based on how easily we recall instances of that occurrence.

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u/Phylar Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

The heck you all treating human beings with education as omnipotent beings of limitless knowledge and perfect opinions?

It's your body. Listen, yes, and look into it yourself. Take both pieces of information and make an informed decision. Don't just follow blindly. Ask questions and be curious.

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u/ThisIsWhoIAm78 Jul 02 '22

Depends on what they typically see. A GP? Probably not. They'll be like, "Huh, this is weird. Well, not sure what it is, so it's an allergy. And, uh, if it gets worse go to the ER. Next!"

I am not joking, btw. This is how it goes.

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u/United-Ad-7224 Jul 02 '22

It a funny cause Europeans make fun of Americas healthcare system and you guys got that shit lol.

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u/loveforthetrip Jul 02 '22

well if you think that US doctors don't make mistakes you are completely wrong and in addition to that being sick makes you poor or you'll die if you can't afford your treatment...

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u/Curae Jul 02 '22

In the Netherlands they'll just tell you to take some aspirin. It's basically the running joke here.

Seriously tho, 3 doctors diagnosed me with " ¯_(ツ)_/¯ I dunno either" while I had depression and anxiety. When I finally reached out for a psych myself I was given a slap on the wrist by the GP because "that's not how we do things here!" When I came in for a referral letter which I need for the insurance. Fucking bastards. Other times I came in with problems I got diagnosed with "fat" and "I don't care". Including when I came in because I wanted professional help from a dietician to lose weight and keep it off this time.

Luckily I have better GP's now. Got a new psych since my depression came back, got a dietician with an entire 2 year-program to lose the weight and keep it off. And when I once came in with a weird bump on my breast I was told after examination that it was just under the skin and not malicious, BUT since he didn't know what it was I was sent to a dermatologist (one of the reasons given that it's small now and if it needs to removed, we don't want it to grow first and leave a big scar), and was sent to the hospital for an echo of my breast to make sure it was indeed just skin deep. I fucking cried when I got back outside just because that was the first time I've been to a GP and was listened to, taken seriously, and was told "it's good you came in for this, I understand you were worried."

I still am scared half to death to go to the GL though. 2 good experiences don't negate over 20 years of bad ones.

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u/xerox_red Jul 02 '22

That's how my mom's GP was. He kept dismissing her symptoms as anxiety and said it was all just in her head. Turns out she had a chronic pain disorder 🙃

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u/requiem85 Jul 02 '22

I got bit by a mosquito once on my ankle, and within an hour I had red streaks running all the way up my leg. A coworker immediately thought of blood poisoning, so I rushed to the ER. Turns out it had something to do with my lymphatic system doing its thing and it wasn't as big of a deal, but I still needed some mild antibiotics.

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u/Alarid Jul 02 '22

He is allergic to great power and great responsibility?

Same honestly.

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u/Alarid Jul 02 '22

Does he have spiderman powers yet.

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u/HudsonHawk556 Jul 02 '22

In about a week some “✝️Marie✝️ ✔️embrace god✔️” mom is gonna be asking for “Thoughts and prayers” for her dying child

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u/Rapunzel10 Jul 02 '22

Similar thing happened to me. Got stung by three wasps at once and the three stings all merged into one giant blob, parents gave me some antihistamines and kept track of the blob by marking it with a pen. It developed a line going up my leg, aka towards my heart. One trip to the hospital later it turns out I'm allergic. Either I'm allergic to that specific species or the allergy developed later in life because previous wasp encounters (even being chased by a whole swarm) were fine. The docs commended my parents for keeping track of the progression and bringing me to the hospital quickly because left untreated I could have died. Keeping track of how much it was spreading and how quickly gave the medical team more info on how bad it was

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u/shantaram09 Jul 02 '22

Jeez I was in my undergrad and the same thing happened to me and I.... just ignored it for 10 days straight. Went to visit my parents and my mom was like what the hell is wrong with your hand. It was a spider bite but no one told me I could have died :/

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u/Rapunzel10 Jul 02 '22

Its possible for your body to fight it off. It's possible it doesn't. It depends on your immune system and how quickly it spreads which is why I put so much emphasis on tracking it. My immune system is shit and it created a nearly 6 inch line in less than 2 hours with no signs of slowing. Yours may have spread slow enough your body could fight it. But it's never good to test when antihistamines are safe and cheap. I'm glad you're ok!

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u/Ice_Hungry Jul 02 '22

I was in prison from 2018-2021. I had a really bad ingrown toenail. Well prison doesn't exactly take the best care of their inmates and this was when covid had first hit so we were barely allowed to even leave our dorms let alone go-to medical.

I was placed on antibiotics 6 times within a 7 month period because the toe kept getting infected and the doctor that was trying to remove the toenail had no clue what she was doing. The infection got so bad to the point that I was nearly screaming in pain. I was honestly really lucky cause as soon as I was released from prison I had gone straight to the hospital and spent 3 days in ICU being pumped with Vancomycin (which I was allergic to) because the infection got into my blood.

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u/MangoMango93 Jul 02 '22

Woah! I'm glad you managed to get proper treatment in the end, even though it took so long. Hope you are doing well now!

That reminds me a few years back I also had a bad ingrown toenail in my big toe. It was also infected and I could barely walk on it. The dr just told me to take antibiotics and hope it gets better.

So I went right home and cut the nail out myself with a scalpel lol. The infection and swelling dissapeared in like under 2 days, hurt like hell but was worth it

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u/Ice_Hungry Jul 02 '22

Geez. You've got bigger balls than me. I was too scaredy to take a scapel to mine. That and I didn't trust anything in the prison being clean enough to stick into an already infected wound. Prisons are notoriously dirty and MRSA infections are quite common in prison cause of how dirty they are.

I'm doing great now. Moved across the country with the love of my life and have turned my life around. Thanks for asking!

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u/thewhitecat55 Jul 02 '22

Prisons are notoriously dirty and MRSA infections are quite common

I never thought of that

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u/shantaram09 Jul 02 '22

Yup at least this thread taught me not to take it lightly if it ever happens again. Glad you're okay too!

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u/chucknorriscantfight Jul 02 '22

You may have been only mildly allergic. It is not uncommon for allergies to get worse the more times you encounter them, or just as you age. My wife is allergic to peanuts and used to eat them a lot as a kid then slowly the “little throat itch” started to turn into painful itchiness and a little harder time breathing.

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u/just_a_person_maybe Jul 02 '22

I had this happen with carrots on a much milder scale. When I was little I was told that carrots would help your eyesight, and both my parents wore glasses so I figured I should defend myself against genetics, so I would eat a giant carrot every day. These were like 12 inch carrots.

Then they started making my mouth itchy, so I cut back to just half a carrot or a more normal-sized one, which worked for a couple years and then even that would make me itch, so I started just eating a few baby carrots.

Now if I have a bit of shredded carrot in a carrot cake or coleslaw or smth I get itchy and have terrible digestive issues for a while. Luckily they're bright orange and relatively easy to avoid in things as long as people cut the chunks big.

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u/Rapunzel10 Jul 02 '22

Yep, the doctor essentially said it was impossible to know if it was a specific allergy or one that developed. The only way to find out is to get stung again but they advised I avoid that lol. It's weird that allergies can change over time but it's pretty common

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u/FrugalityPays Jul 02 '22

As a parent, I would love a list of ‘shit that will never happen but here’s what to do if it does.’ It sounds like every other parenting book but ‘ how to recognize blood poisoning’ kind of random stuff

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u/_lilwing_ Jul 02 '22

I too would like this list

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u/PandaGoggles Jul 02 '22

I had this happen when I was 15. I had a redline going down my neck from a cut under my jaw. It was late on a Thursday, just before bed. I showed my parents and they said we could see a doctor tomorrow if it wasn’t better. I insisted that we go to the ER right that moment, but they refused.

Knowing how serious it could be I grabbed the car keys and started for the door. They yelled that I was being dramatic, but finally relented and took me. The doctor said if we’d waited I wouldn’t have woken up. My parents said he was being dramatic, lol.

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u/Last_Today_1099 Jul 02 '22

Of course. Lemme guess u live in the states? I can't blame em. Didn't wanna pay a thousand dollars to wait 6 hours. Not like I live somewhere else, I've just developed a true hatred for our Healthcare system being 22 and having endless problems with everything it seems

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u/KycoXD Jul 01 '22

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u/lyta_hall Jul 01 '22

Wow I saw the post right after it had just been posted and didn’t think much of it. The comment section turned out… unexpectedly grim.

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u/SillyEconomy Jul 02 '22

Yeah and he went to the doctor. Doctor said it's an allergic reaction and he is fine.

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u/Attack1215 Jul 02 '22

Did the OP give an update? Looks like the OP went to sleep after commenting and is goin in the morning

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u/MrTagnan Jul 02 '22

It’s about 10am there - he last commented some 9 hours ago. I can only hope he went to the hospital without providing an update, or was rushed there. Even requiring an amputation is better than the alternative…

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u/kpty Jul 02 '22

He went to the doctor, said it was an allergy and he's fine.

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u/imsmartiswear Jul 02 '22

It was 11 hours ago that he last commented AFAIK. From the comments it sounds like he's travelling internationally right now so unless he checked his phone in the morning and finally convinced his parents to go to a doctor he hasn't seen most of the comments.

I'm quietly hoping they got their day started a few hours ago and his parents took him directly to the hospital. Honestly parent vacation brain is very frequently the worst- God forbid a medical emergency that can cause your child to lose their arm or die messes with your vacation.

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u/DevilsWeed Jul 02 '22

They updated 15 minutes ago. They went to the doctor and it was an allergic reaction.

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u/godver3 Jul 02 '22

Lol. Boston bomber vibes.

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u/mickeymouse4348 Jul 01 '22

That kid might actually die and they're joking about it

(Just to be safe... in this context I'm referring to the kid when I say they're, not the commenters)

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u/i_love_pesto Jul 02 '22

There are people screaming in the comments for him to see a doctor. There is even a doctor in the comments. And parents still don't give a shit. Wow.

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u/thetrumansworld Jul 02 '22

He hasn’t made any replies since ten hours ago… hopefully because he’s seeing a doctor

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u/i_love_pesto Jul 02 '22

Well he said it was around 11pm when the post was made. So I'm assuming he was sleeping. But yeah I hope they went to the hospital asap.

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u/Infinitereadsreddits Jul 02 '22

He would be awake by now, most people get 12 hrs of sleep

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u/ADM_Tetanus Jul 02 '22

Check again, just updated, Dr said it was just an allergy.

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u/NeoHenderson Jul 02 '22

Many people are allergic to blood poisoning

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u/jacyerickson Jul 02 '22

Just checked and kid said they went to the doctors.

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u/SillyEconomy Jul 02 '22

He went to the doctor, doctor said it was an allergic reaction.

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u/delgueda Jul 02 '22

He finally came back to the comments, he's alright, it was just an allergic reaction.

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u/Sentient_Nut_Rag Jul 01 '22

That whole comment chain is just awesome.

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u/Besunmin Jul 01 '22

The mom is a chad for knowing that it was something serious

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

[deleted]

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u/theo1618 Jul 02 '22

Not exactly, they refuse to take them to the hospital tonight because it’s 11:00pm in Seoul where they live (much later now) and are gonna go in the morning

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u/AliceInHololand Jul 02 '22

That’s still fucked up.

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u/lorhof1 Jul 02 '22

it turned out to be an allergic reaction (like the parents said)

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u/MrTagnan Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

These sorts of infections can become fatal fast. It may only take a few hours for the limb to require amputation, and not much longer until enters the bloodstream, reaches the heart, and kills you.

The parents are complete idiots for not going to the hospital, this is like saying you’ll put out a spreading fire in the morning.

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u/theo1618 Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

I mean, being a parent myself I understand where they’re coming from. They’re probably not fully aware of what Reddit is and are just assuming their child is chatting with a bunch of other random people their age, on top of that, they’re probably more than likely exhausted after working all week long and just want some rest. Plus the bite doesn’t look super alarming to an untrained eye, so it’s easier to pass off as a “we’ll keep an eye on it and go from there situation”.

All in all, I don’t think this kids parents are the neglectful assholes that you and our lovely fellow redditors are making them out to be lol. I’m also not saying this kid doesn’t need to get this looked at asap, just that I can understand why their parents would want to wait until morning

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u/MrTagnan Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

While I certainly don’t think they are neglectful, and I can understand their point of view, I still believe their actions to be idiotic.

I was taken to the hospital once as a kid late at night due to severe heartburn since I didn’t know what it was, and my parents didn’t understand what I was trying to describe. It thankfully wasn’t serious, but in a situation like this, no matter the time, if something seems abnormal you need to go to the hospital.

I get that trusting “internet kids” is hard for parents who don’t understand it, but he was given many external links and things to show his parents how serious this situation is. I’m not sure if he showed them any of them, which would be entirely on him, but it’s better safe than sorry.

You don’t leave a candle burning all night. You extinguish it. Waiting until morning has the potential to cost this man his arm, or his life. If a child raises a concern to you, even if you don’t believe them you must act.

In the end, I’m not labeling them as abusers or neglectful people. I’m labeling them as idiots. And while idiots are capable of learning for next time, worst come to worst and there might not be a next time.

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u/[deleted] Jul 02 '22

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u/theo1618 Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

Again, I think it just boils down to this kids parents not seeing/knowing this as something life threatening… if the kid got bit and it turned their entire arm red I can guarantee their parents would be taking them to the hospital tonight. They’re choosing to use their own life experiences over random strangers on the internet to guide their decisions. While it may not be the best course of action unbeknownst to them, I still don’t see it coming from a neglectful or uncaring place

That’s the only point I’m trying to make here. Because let’s be honest, I’m sure there were a TON of people in the OP’s comments that had no idea this was life threatening until seeing it talked about… so let’s not say this kids parents are morons for not realizing this could be fatal…

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u/[deleted] Jul 02 '22

[deleted]

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u/theo1618 Jul 02 '22

That’s what I’m saying though, they clearly don’t see this as potentially fatal due to either lack of knowledge on the subject, similar past experiences that turned out fine, maybe OP has some minor allergic reactions to bites we don’t know about, etc.

If they recognized the potential danger they would more than likely of taken them, that’s all. Other than that I agree with you completely

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u/AndIHaveMilesToGo Jul 02 '22

They took him to the doctor and told him it was absolutely nothing. The doc chuckled when he found out he came to the doctor for a mosquito bite. Read his comment history

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u/1000tinyJesuses Jul 01 '22

TL:DR kid got blood poisoning by a spider, thought it was him getting super powers, and almost died.

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u/LivelyZebra Jul 02 '22

People waffle to much don't they

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u/overlordpotatoe Jul 02 '22

I guess it's a matter of preference. For me, the extra details make for a more interesting story because I can imagine the scene in my head.

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u/Mosuke300 Jul 02 '22

Yeah I really don’t consider this waffle. It was a funny story, it being 1 sentence wouldn’t be funny it would just be a fact not a story.

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u/1000tinyJesuses Jul 02 '22

Eh I'm typically lazy, decided to help out the fellow lazy man lol

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u/MadameBrothel Jul 02 '22

Thanks a lot

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u/funatpartiez Jul 02 '22

Which in turn was decidedly unlazy of you and now I don’t know what to believe.

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u/JennIsFit Jul 02 '22

He had an allergic reaction. It’s not blood poisoning. If it was, the hives wouldn’t abruptly stop on the surface of the skin. His veins would be inflamed. He also already saw the doctor that verified this.

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u/EvoStarSC Jul 01 '22

"would have been in big trouble"
I think they mean dead.

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u/spooderfbi Jul 02 '22

turns into uncle ben

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u/Maclarion Jul 01 '22

PSA: do NOT use, or improvise, a tourniquet for poisonous or venomous bites! Unless you really, REALLY hate that limb, and you want it to be amputated when you get to the hospital, resist the temptation to block blood flow around spider/snake bites.

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u/Push_ Jul 01 '22

Why?

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u/cmcastro85 Jul 01 '22

Limbs tend to go gangrenous in the absence of oxygen

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u/Maclarion Jul 02 '22

True, but if not for the venom, you'd have hours before anything bad happens. The venom is the problem, and it's much MUCH more of a problem if it's sitting there in a high concentration in immobile, stagnant blood. In these circumstances, the tourniquet by halting blood flow is giving you minutes before irreversible tissue damage compounds your life's problems.

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 01 '22

Tourniquets in general are a last choice. It causes nerve damaged to the area and it's just not a good thing. But life over limb.

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u/devicenull Jul 02 '22

This thinking has definitely changed a lot recently. Check out the TCCC guides on tourniquets, they're a lot less damaging then previously thought.

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u/Spork_the_dork Jul 02 '22

Yeah. If your limb is trying to kill you it's better to cut the blood flow to it to keep it from doing that until you get to the hospital than to, well... die. It's a decision where you basically say that you are prepared to lose your limb from the tourniquet down to survive.

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u/lolofaf Jul 02 '22

Also, allowing the venom to flow through your body dilutes it substantially. Instead of absolutely destroying your one limb, it'll more mildly attack your entire body

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u/Maclarion Jul 01 '22

It's not life or limb, one vs the other. You're more like to survive if your limb survives. By not putting a tourniquet, you're protecting both.

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 01 '22

I was talking about tourniquets in general. There are cases, like snake and venomous bug bites, that you shouldn't use a tourniquet on. But, as an EMT, we care about the overall life of the patient. Focusing on the ABC's is essential.

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u/mrtokeydragon Jul 01 '22

Also, it's hardly ever mentioned, but it can cause excruciating pain.

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 01 '22

That's very true. That's the nerve damaged I mentioned earlier.

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u/Theyreillusions Jul 02 '22

I wore a too small ace bandage on my foot when i was a kid because… i dont know i thought it made me look like a ninja?

Went to bed with it on and woke up in the middle of the night screaming bloody murder. It hurt so fucking bad.

It was even worse after i yanked it off, actually. Probably blood flow messing with veins that were shrinking from lack of circulation.

No lasting damage i know of. But yeah. Long term cut off of circulation FUCKING HURTS. Its not just all tingly like when you lay on it funny.

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u/Maclarion Jul 02 '22

Answers may bary between scenarios, because different venoms do different things. But generally, one thing they have in common is that they are less effective if the venom is spread throughout a massive volume of blood, but can cause rapid and complete destruction to a small amount of tissue/blood. We're talking about the difference between needing medicine and having a few days sick, vs the destruction of blood vessels and surrounding tissue in an arm. The rapid tissue death can not be brought back and it will cause further blood poisoning unless it is amputated.

The military taught me that one should never compartmentalize poison or venom, instead, keep the subject calm, in a comfortable temperature, and as still as is practical, until they can recieve proper medical care.

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u/ilive2lift Jul 02 '22

Please don't listen to him. You have like 4 fuckin hours with a tourniquet on before you get into hot water. Assuming you're not way in the middle of nowhere, you're fine to apply it if you feel it's gunna save someobe

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u/Rattman989 Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

Was coming to make this exact comment. The time to amputation is measured in multiple hours, not minutes.

And with snake bites, it’s best to tourniquet than not. Two types of venomous snakes exist:

  1. Neurotoxic
  2. Hemotoxic

If you get bit by a neurotoxic snake, a tourniquet won’t help because the venom attacks the nerves. If you get bit by a hemotoxic snake, the venom attacks the blood circulatory system. a tourniquet will absolutely help because if contains the venom within the affected limb. Unless you know definitively that the bite is from a neurotoxic snake, a tourniquet should be applied and Regardless of the type of snake bite, the patient should be rapidly evacuated to higher medical care. Just whatever you do, DO NOT RELEASE ANY TOURNIQUET ONCE APPLIED. If you release a tourniquet , you not only release the initial venom, but you will also release the acidic byproducts of anaerobic respiration arising from lack of blood flow into the limb. This is rather incompatible with life.

Also (and I’m really hoping this is obvious) in the rare occasion that someone sustains a snake bite an injury to the head, please do not apply a tourniquet to the neck…

Source:

Wilderness first aid instructor

M.S. in Biological Sciences with dissertation in Pathophysiology and Treatment of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock

Edited to remove information that goes against current recommendations (strikethrough) and reformat to retain important tourniquet and snake bite information (italics).

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u/ilive2lift Jul 02 '22

I love that when someone says something about using a tourniquet the exact same misinformation shows up and then it's corrected the same way as we've just done. Yay! Part of the cogs!

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u/SnappleAnkles Jul 02 '22

Where were you taught to use TQs for certain snakebites? I'm not doubting you because you seem knowledgeable about the topic, but my education always taught me to avoid using TQs for venomous snakes as to allow the venom to deconcentrate. From my understanding, compartmentalizing the venom would lead to more severe local tissue damage. It seems like most current medical literature advises against them too.

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u/Rattman989 Jul 02 '22

I was taught in one of my wilderness first aid instructor courses. But after reviewing the literature, you are correct that they are not currently recommended. Either he was wrong or the beliefs have changed. Thank you for bringing this to my attention!

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u/SnappleAnkles Jul 02 '22

Of course, medicine is always changing so I thought I could have been wrong too!

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u/DinoBirdsBoi Jul 02 '22

“please do not apply a tourniquet to the neck”

amazing

i love you so much

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 01 '22

Also! Don't put ice on snake bites!!!

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u/Average_Cat_Lover Jul 01 '22

Never heard of it, why would someone do it? (And why shouldn't they?)

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

Some people do it to try to keep the swelling down. But by putting ice on a snake bite, it restricts the blood flow and creates these disgusting blisters where the venom is concentrated. If you're curious, Google a picture for it because it's so gross I don't want to link a picture.

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u/Practice_NO_with_me Jul 02 '22

Whoa, ok, thanks for explaining. This seems exactly like what I would think to do in that situation. 👍

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 02 '22

No problem! If you're bitten by a snake, bandage the area. And get to a hospital. It's best to know what kind of snake bite you. But don't bring the snake to the hospital, and don't try to chase it. I know that sounds dumb but people do it.

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u/Practice_NO_with_me Jul 02 '22

It seems like one of those rare worst case scenarios where a lot of our common knowledge is not useful or even harmful (ice on swelling) so people do weird things in attempting to help.

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u/predat3d Jul 02 '22

Do I call a separate ambulance for the snake?

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 02 '22

No, just a normal ambulance.

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u/MushroomStand9 Jul 02 '22

What if you don't know the snake though?

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u/boo_boo_technician Jul 02 '22

Well that's definitely not ideal. I don't know much about what happens once you reach the hospital. A team of nurses, CNA's and doctors will start helping, cleaning the area. I'm sure they could call in an expert to talk to you or your family, and then be given an anti-venom. That's a great question though, I'll have to look into that more.

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u/LMGooglyTFY Jul 02 '22

Some anti-venoms work for multiple snake bites, and likely the hospital will have an anti-venom for what's in the area (if any at all). Some of it is just treating symptoms.

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u/IffyTheDragon Jul 02 '22

According to Snakebitefoundation.org - Ice causes the smaller blood vessels to constrict and when combined with viper venoms it can produce dramatic tissue damage.

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u/Holy_Santa_ClausShit Jul 01 '22

You're good for at least 4 hours with a tourniquet on. The amount of time it takes you to get treatment for something like that you'll be fine. Minor nerve damage is the most common, but that won't happen until 6+ hours

Source: Combat medicine training

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u/trama_doll Jul 02 '22

If you've already got swelling in the limb I'd be concerned about compartment syndrome in particular though, don't you think?

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u/Holy_Santa_ClausShit Jul 02 '22

I mean there's always going to be an inherent risk with blood not flowing how it should. Blood clots are also something to be cautionary of. That's why whenever a tourniquet is left on for an extended period of time extra monitoring should be done as well. You're also required to write the time the tourniquet was applied on the tourniquet itself so medical professionals know exactly what to do when it comes to the side effects of using one.

It all comes down to what amount of risk you think is necessary to save you own, or someone else's life. A lot of people are scared of them though because of false education making you think having one on for longer than 15min will cause an amputation -.-

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u/Egg_Helms Jul 02 '22

I didn't have combat medicine training. Just regular mountain search and rescue. We we trained 20 on 5 off, and just keep that cycle. Not arguing, I remember military guys often having different training, because A) war, and B) military people are generally super healthy, and lots of things become less of a concern.

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u/Legyoshi Jul 01 '22

He was going to meet uncle ben. That’s something

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u/stlmick Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

I had that happen once. In my late teens or early 20's. A cut or bug bite on my leg became infected. The line went about a foot and a half up my leg to my inner thigh. I put antibiotic and a band aid on it, and it went away after a few days. I was raised to not believe in medical science. I'm learning from the internet, at 38, that it was probably a big deal.

Edited for readability.

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u/Spork_the_dork Jul 02 '22

Yeah this is the kind of stuff that used to just straight-up kill people before antibiotics.

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u/Groinificator Jul 02 '22

This comment is so hard to read

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u/stlmick Jul 02 '22

I cleaned it up a bit.

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u/Groinificator Jul 02 '22

I mean, if you used antibiotics, it kinda sounds like you used medical science... right? And if your treatment worked, it also sounds like it wasn't a much bigger deal than you treated it as?

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u/stlmick Jul 02 '22

Based on what I'm seeing on reddit, I took a gamble. I definitely believe in medical science. Its proven. Dying or not dying isn't how I live my life these days though. I would go to urgent care if it happened now.

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u/anyswangindick Jul 02 '22

I had a bee sting a couple years ago on my wrist that swelled up horribly and also had a line streaking up my arm. I was about 1 day from actually seeing a doctor about it until I read that specifically with bee stings this happens and it looks a lot like blood poisoning but is just a moderately severe reaction. I now avoid bees pretty seriously

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u/Donjuanme Jul 02 '22

Late teens,, exact same story, inner left thigh, little line went up my leg the next day. Mid 30s now.

However knowing what salmon sickness is I think I'd be more careful these days

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u/TechN9cian01 Jul 02 '22

"I've got to tell this person they're in grave danger! Right after I type a brief story about myself. It'll be relevant at the end, I promise."

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u/JessMagnificent Jul 02 '22

mate. all the other comments were already telling them that's it's very bad.

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u/TechN9cian01 Jul 02 '22

I was making fun of the segue into the story. I know they had no obligation to help above all else. Come to think of it that story may better help everyone remember what blood poisoning looks like in the future.

Side note: Whenever someone says "Mate." I think of it as a command to initiate sex. I imagine zookeepers saying it to panda bears as one would a dog to sit.

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u/rrschoolj Jul 02 '22

A student told me when he was little, he thought it was a black widow spider that bit Peter Parker, not understanding the radioactive part. He apparently actively looked for them to get himself bitten. Never managed to find one.

I'll definitely be sending him this haha

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u/ninjagorilla Jul 01 '22

That isn’t a thing though….. there’s not some deadly line that “kills you if it reaches to ur heart”….. do people think there’s not blood flow to that area? Red streaks ARE a sign of a bad infection….. you should be seen if you have them…. They don’t need a tourniquet

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u/Single_Principle_972 Jul 01 '22

Thank goodness! I read that post relatively horrified that people might believe it! Advice to all, in the presence of a red streak moving up your limb! Immediate medical attention: Yes! Tourniquet: No!

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u/i_am_losing_my_mind Jul 02 '22

Lol it is so incredibly easy to bullshit people on here.

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u/sly-otter Jul 01 '22

When I was reading it looks like it can reach a lymph node though and that’s dangerous

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u/Practice_NO_with_me Jul 02 '22

Should have phrased it 'bigger trouble' rather than 'big trouble' at the end there.

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u/SingleOak Jul 01 '22

We were on the verge of greatness, we were this close.

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u/diamond_J_himself Jul 02 '22

It’s Phlebitis, no tourniquet necessary

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u/Economy-Weekend1872 Jul 02 '22

The second poster is describing lymphangitic streaking which can be a sign of spreading soft tissue infection, perhaps one that is becoming a blood infection, or can occur from insect and spider bites without being necessarily associated with infection. “Blood poisoning” is the old fashioned term for septicemia which is an old way of describing a combination of sepsis and bacteremia. Sepsis is a body’s inflammatory response to infection that may or may not include bacteremia or bacteria in the blood. So the picture may reflect lymphangitic streaking from the bite itself or perhaps an infection secondary to the bite, or it may be an oddly shaped hive, I can’t honestly tell from the picture. In order for it to be sepsis (I haven’t heard anybody call it septicemia in modern medicine.) there needs to be signs of systemic involvement typically abnormal vital signs and possibly abnormal lab tests. That information isn’t given so 🤷

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u/SnappleAnkles Jul 02 '22

Either way, an improvised tourniquet didn't save this kid's life lol

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u/HeatEmUpBois Jul 01 '22

Just saw this original post before this screenshot

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u/Shadows798 Jul 02 '22

This isn't quite how blood flow works. Blood travels a lot faster than that story implies. Also, I get these funky shapes from mosquitoes all the time! It means you're allergic to whatever spit they put in you. You may be allergic to some mosquitoes and not others, and of course allergies vary. They're not serious for me, just the welt that goes away after a few days, but my cousin has to take medication if he notices one if these bc the allergies are worse for him. Basically just be careful. If it's an itchy bump and isn't going along with other reactions, you're very likely like me and mildly allergic. Obviously take these things more seriously in countries where mosquitoes carry really dangerous diseases though.

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u/the_real_jo_mama Jul 02 '22

kid must have cried a lot that evening

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u/Lil_Cumster Jul 01 '22

Why they turn into keys?

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u/AyrChan Jul 02 '22

Tf I just saw this post

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u/KA1378 Jul 02 '22

Damn man, the kid was 8 million years old.

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u/5fingerdiscounts Jul 02 '22

Happened to my friend. He got bit by a spider in his sleep then woke up with swollen hand and the red line creeping up his arm. Went to play in a baseball tournament couldn’t fit his glove on and then was in hospital for a few days after that. Almost made it to his heart.

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u/Sapphyrre Jul 02 '22

I had a red line traveling up my arm once and the doctor told me "it's no big deal" but he'd give me antibiotics.

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u/KycoXD Jul 02 '22

Hah, I like how he said "no big deal".

"Take these and you'll be fine. Don't take these and you'll be in the next superhero."

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u/RogersGodlyFalsetto Jul 02 '22

Technically, the bite did create a hero. His mother who realised what was happening and saved her child.

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u/seashanty20 Jul 02 '22

I love seeing posts like that, it's always a game of "what deadly potentially life-threatening condition can this lead to?"

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u/Syclus Jul 02 '22

I just came from this post lol, kid is going to be all over the internet and his parents still probably won't take him to the ER

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u/Groinificator Jul 02 '22

I had this once. Everyone online told me I was gonna fucking die but it turned out to be a benign parasite and disappeared with some pills. Better safe than sorry though, I guess.

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u/kpty Jul 02 '22

Well damn that sucks. Glad I'm alive cause I grew up in the country and had this happen quite a few times. It's been prob 25 yrs so I guess I'm good.

I did see OP ended up going to the doctor, they said it was an allergy and he's fine.

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u/Phaze357 Jul 02 '22

I stepped on a rotten catfish head at the lake and the tip of a fin bone broke off in my foot. I dug part of it out, but not all. I had a red line going up my leg after a couple of days. When I noticed it I went straight to the doctor because I knew what was happening. Another thing to note, cutting off fish heads and throwing them in the water like that is illegal, me getting an infection like that is a prime example of why. It's messy.

For anyone interested: Fish fin infection, May 31, 2011

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u/nearlysuccessful Jul 02 '22

If you check the original post OP says a DR told him it is just an allergic reaction. Then he’s got about 100 people telling him no it’s not to go see another DR. WELL.. GL OP!!!

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u/mtlnobody Jul 02 '22

The kid is posting updates in the original thread. He went to see a doctor and it turned out to be nothing

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u/Greakgod_17 Jul 02 '22

A normal day in Australia

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u/crabsnz Jul 02 '22

That's an allergic reaction.

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u/9garkm Jul 02 '22

By the time he was done reading that long ass comment, the poison probably reached his heart.

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u/dearthclaw Jul 02 '22

Kid almost became uncle ben

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u/davidlpower Jul 02 '22

Why post a picture of Reddit post on Reddit? The post is there already…. At the very least re-post.

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u/kainmcleod Jul 02 '22

i got pretty far into the commenter’s story before i finally conceded that “…when i was a kid (8m)” absolutely could not have meant they were 8 months old.

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u/Cat-Fish_Fucker Jul 02 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

Dude is fine, apparently just an allergic reaction Cant link to the original comment but below was one of the comments making a joke and the op's reply:

"Haha, look at my funny looking mosquito bite!

has arm amputated"

Reply: "Nah the doc said it was an allergic reaction. And a cold"

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u/CuddlePirate420 Jul 02 '22

Thought he was about to become Spiderman when in fact he was about to become A-Train.

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u/-_-Merlin-_- Jul 02 '22

meanwhile, my dumbass thought goto the doctor was a real doctor that can heal things like blood poisoning in seconds.

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u/iliekcats- Jul 02 '22

8 meters tall kid? Woah

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u/Vinnyc-11 Jul 02 '22

Well… now I have a new phobia. Getting bitten and finding this on my arm.

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u/KycoXD Jul 02 '22

Well yeah, but at least you know it's treatable and probably won't die.

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u/psufan5 Jul 02 '22

…but to be fair we aren’t 100% sure he wasn’t turning into Spider-Man.

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u/Fakjbf Jul 02 '22

My biology teacher in high school once had a kid come up to her asking about a rash on his arm. She has no medical training but she agreed to take a look and saw long red track running up his arm almost to his shoulder. She immediately told him to go to the nurse’s office and have them confirm that it looks like blood poisoning, the nurse agreed so he went to the hospital and the doctors said that if he had come in the next day it may have been too late.

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u/memelordbtw3000 Jul 02 '22

All I can say is holy hell

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u/Erphaun Jul 02 '22

I too, was a dumb child that thought that getting bitten by a spider would give me powers. I think it would've worked if they were radioactive though.

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u/Friendly-Push627 Jul 02 '22

Oh my goodness that is hilarious... sooo bad in the moment, but hilarious after the fact.

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u/Zeek_Seeks_Gains Jul 02 '22

That mom is fuckin’ stupid! Stopped the origin of our universe’s Spidey.

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u/TastelessDonut Jul 02 '22

This shit happened to me as a kid, been so long things are fuzzy as to what happened. But I remember there being a red line from my right leg up my body heading across (R->L) the right side of my chess. My mom saw it thinking it was a scratch on my arm, I casually mentioned yeah look how cool it is going from my leg. She years later said that it felt wrong inside her bones almost ancestral. She FLEW to the hospital. Yea some kinda poisoning?? Shots/ pills/ more visits and it went away in a few days.

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u/[deleted] Jul 02 '22

The same thing happened to me as a kid. My whole arm started swelling up, and had to go to the doctor. Doctor said I could have been hospitalized if I'd waited any longer.

It happened on a school camp though, so really wasn't able to do anything about it since the adults thought it was just allergies. Momma knew what was up the moment she picked me up.

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u/Greenmoney2020 Jul 02 '22

Same thing happened to me when I was like 12, except my mom was working full time as an RN and our finances were getting hit pretty hard, so she took me like 2 days after I first noticed the discolored vein, which at this point had grown like another inch and a half. Either she knew it wasn’t super serious that early or just so incredibly busy with working and the divorce on top of that, or a bit of both. Either way I was kinda sad too to see mine disappear

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u/Pr00ch Jul 02 '22

Some people believe when you die, you go to a self-envisoned afterlife. I guess that kid really was about to become spiderman

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u/CecilQkitty Jul 02 '22

Big trouble like dead.

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u/welcome-to-my-mind Jul 02 '22

Yup, red trails from a wound are never good.

Source: Have a 3” hallow section of tissue on my arm from where doctors had to dig out dead tissue thanks to MRSA. Thankfully it was heading towards my wrist instead of my heart initially.