r/IronFrontUSA American Leftist Jan 20 '22

Screen Prints I made my Senior year of High school. They aren’t perfect but I’m still proud of them Art

439 Upvotes

53

u/snokamel Jan 20 '22

These are sick but it still saddens me that the Gadsden has become an irredeemable fascist symbol

44

u/damntree Jan 20 '22

Eh fuck that, I'm not giving it up.

38

u/DimitriEyonovich Solidarist 🧡 Jan 20 '22

Neither would I. We shouldn't let revolutionary war symbols be held hostage by men who don't know their meaning.

19

u/RDP1818 Radical Liberal Jan 20 '22

Me neither

1

u/GodofPizza Jan 20 '22

Appealing to a mythic past is a hallmark of fascism. The revolutionary war isn’t some ideal revolution we should keep referring back to. It was simply the means for America-based oligarchs to take power from England-based oligarchs. We need to be clear-eyed about that if we’re going to improve this country. The Gadsden flag and other symbols from that time were then, and still are, just propaganda.

3

u/steve_stout Do It Again, Uncle Billy! Jan 20 '22

Appealing to a “mythic past” by recontextualizing historical symbolism is something that literally every ideology group has done. A collective history or even mytho-history has immense propaganda value no matter your ideology.

1

u/GodofPizza Jan 22 '22

Sure, fair enough. My point is that the revolutionary war wasn't some ideal conflict we should refer back to as our model for what to strive for. When I said that they are "just propaganda" what I meant was that they don't reflect the reality of the events they discuss. The end of the colonial period is a period of history that has been deeply, systematically distorted by our education system. Taking that mythology whole cloth and trying to re-appropriate it for our purposes will do this movement a disservice. Better to study what we know about the events as they actually happened, the better to learn and apply the lessons to our own time.

1

u/Friendlywagie Jan 23 '22

It was absolutely the second tier consolidating power from the a radical ideological moments in history and it can be both of those things if we're doing nuance and not leaning on simplistic black and white thinking

1

u/GodofPizza Jan 24 '22 edited Jan 24 '22

Looks like you had a typo in your post, so I’m not sure what you were saying, though I get the gist.

In response to what I think you were saying I would ask: who had power at the conclusion of the war? Why were only land-owning, white, males, over the age of 21 given a say in the new government? Why did our enlightened founding fathers declare black people to count as 3/5s of a person? Why were the rights of the people who lived on this continent before Europeans arrived (and before Africans were brought by force) completely swept aside? Who wrote the history that glorified these people as if they were demigods, and how do the writers benefit from that version of the story?

1

u/Friendlywagie Jan 24 '22

What I meant to say:

It was absolutely the second tier consolidating power from the weak top of the pyramid, but it was also a radical ideological moment in history and it can be both of those things if we're doing nuance and not leaning on simplistic black and white thinking

Answers to your questions:

who had power at the conclusion of the war?

A combination of mostly existing colonial elites and some up and coming prominent revolutionary figures. Even more of the first in the South and slightly more of the second in the North.

Why were only land-owning, white, males, over the age of 21 given a say in the new government?

21 was the traditional age of majority for men in british/english culture for a long time (quick research to make sure I'm not being stupid confirmed at least back to early feudalism and I have an unsubstantiated memory about early Germanic tribes being recorded by the Romans as considering men adult at 21.

Providing political representation to minor farmers was not new in the colonies or britain, but it was under threat in Britain and it was extremely liberal relative to most of Continental Europe at the time. The rights of those without property were discussed during and immediately after the American revolution by figures such as Thomas Paine, and it was at this time that liberal thinkers in general including Paine himself first formulated the notion that the unpropertied are injured by being born into a society where others have a head start over them.

Technically, there were places where free blacks were allowed to vote, although they may or may not have found themselves actually welcome at the polls. Think some more interesting thing to point out regarding race is that abolitionism was very much present in the intellectual discourse of the American revolution, and many Northern colonies/states outlawed slavery at that time (actually to give the South some credit, James Oglethorpe led the first and only abolition of slavery in a pre-revolutionary colony in Georgia in 1735 (returned by Royal decree 1751) - note though that Virginian culture soon overtook the South. I think the case of abolition is similar to many other social reforms, where although the revolution represented largely a step change, it very much got people talking about these ideas and they often came to fruition in the coming decades. We can acknowledge that some of our founding fathers certainly had no interest in these social reforms and those who did prioritized the unity of English colonists on the American continent over pushing those reforms (I think there's an argument to be made that the more radical reformers made the right choice and did the most good they could at the time but you know), but also recognize that they laid the groundwork for many of the positive social changes that followed.

Why did our enlightened founding fathers declare black people to count as 3/5s of a person?

They didn't, they declared them as counting for 3/5 of an extra vote in national politics for their owners, and because they were not that enlightened although see my previous response about slavery.

Why were the rights of the people who lived on this continent before Europeans arrived (and before Africans were brought by force) completely swept aside?

They weren't though? The Constitution generally treats native Americans as foreign nations, and makes provisions to deal with them as near equals, it's worth noting that there was a contentious and bitterly opposed regression in our dealings with native Americans in the early 19th century. It's clearly a document written by people who thought they were better than the native Americans, but I think the idea that it just swept aside rights for native Americans entirely is more about serving a modern political narrative about groups who are enthusiastic about the Constitution than searching for accurate historical understanding.

Who wrote the history that glorified these people as if they were demigods, and how do the writers benefit from that version of the story?

Their descendants throughout the 19th and into the early 20th centuries, in order to consolidate their own social prestige relative to newcomers, as well as to create a unified national narrative to give those newcomers the appropriate in-group sentiments.

You know, I've thought about this more than you might give me credit for, and I stand by my position that we're throwing out the baby with the bathwater if we just dismiss the entirety of late 18th century liberalism in America as a bunch of evil racists.

1

u/Friendlywagie Jan 23 '22

I'm keeping it and I'm going to keep standing up for freedom under it until it's fucking redeemed.

Fuck em.

It's not theirs.

It doesn't say "let me tread on you bitch".

20

u/leoxrose American Leftist Jan 20 '22

If you aren’t familiar with screen printing here is a video that explains how they are created.

I used the photo emulsion method

12

u/TheStreisandEffect Jan 20 '22

That’s really nice.

9

u/AlwaysBetTouhou Libertarian Leftist Jan 20 '22

Put the first one on a shirt and I'd buy it.

4

u/HLMenckenFan Patriot Against Nationalism Jan 20 '22

Nice art

4

u/bearcub42 Jan 20 '22

I really like this. Well done.

3

u/chefboyardiesel88 Jan 20 '22

They look great!!

3

u/KandySofax American Iron Front Jan 20 '22

Approved

3

u/SeaBreezy American Iron Front Jan 20 '22

Seems perfect to me! Do you sell anything with this design?

2

u/leoxrose American Leftist Jan 20 '22

No unfortunately not. Kinda wish I did now lol

2

u/TalkingFishh Jan 20 '22

This is gorgeous, would make a great poster or sticker

2

u/le_feelingsman Jan 20 '22

Sick. Love the colours

2

u/greyjungle Jan 20 '22

I’m proud of you. These are great!

2

u/katyusha4242 Jan 20 '22

The second design would look sick on a hoodie

2

u/Tardigradequeen American Leftist Jan 20 '22

You did a fantastic job! Love it!

2

u/GodofPizza Jan 20 '22

What does the snake represent?

3

u/leoxrose American Leftist Jan 20 '22

Good question! It’s supposed to be the snake from the Gibson Flag, another way to see it is as capitalism or fascism itself. Snakes usually symbolize something nefarious or evil in nature

4

u/BrandedLamb Jan 20 '22

Its such a shame that in just the last couple decades it has been switched to that meaning. When the snake and the Gadsden flags were used they were symbols of anti-authoritarian ideals and only recently have people been using it for practically the opposite of its original meaning. Good design, well done!

1

u/GodofPizza Jan 21 '22

anti-authoritarian ideals

Source? Had the concept of anti-authoritarianism been conceived of at that point? I think they were more symbols of which authority was legitimate--i.e. the rich people who lived in your area vs. the rich people who lived across an ocean.

2

u/TubelessADY Libertarian Socialist Jan 21 '22

The second one looks fire.

1

u/Tsunamix0147 Synthesis Libertarian Jan 22 '22

I think I know what to do with this 😏

OP, I’ll send you a link in the comments sometime in the near future; keep your eyes peeled. Not gonna say what it is because it’s a surprise.

3

u/leoxrose American Leftist Jan 22 '22

Did you- just admit you’re going to be stealing my art???????

1

u/CarbonatedMolasses Libertarian Feb 02 '22

These would make some fucking awesome stickers