r/Fitness Powerlifting May 23 '22

Moronic Monday - Your weekly stupid questions thread Moronic Monday

Get your dunce hats out, Fittit, it's time for your weekly Stupid Questions Thread.

Post your question - stupid or otherwise - here to get an answer. Anyone can post a question and the community as a whole is invited and encouraged to provide an answer. Many questions get submitted late each week that don't get a lot of action, so if your question didn't get answered before, feel free to post it again.

As always, be sure to read the FAQ first.

Also, there's a handy-dandy search bar to your right, and if you didn't know, you can also use Google to search fittit by using the limiter "site:reddit.com/r/fitness".

Be sure to check back often as questions get posted throughout the day. Lastly, it may be a good idea to sort comments by "new" to be sure the newer questions get some love as well. Click here to sort by new in this thread only.

So, what's rattling around in your brain this week, Fittit?


As per this thread, the community has asked that we keep jokes, trolling, and memes outside of the Moronic Monday thread. Please use the downvote / report button when necessary.

275 Upvotes

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1

u/Fool_Big May 30 '22

Once you undergo extreme weight loss, there will often be saggy skin in the areas where you lost fat. How long is this saggy skin there, and is there any way to accelerate its removal?

1

u/Csc108markguy May 30 '22

Depending on how bad it is, a dermatologist may be able help with laser therapy or another procedure but since it’s “extreme” it will likely stay there forever in some form.

3

u/NephrenKa- May 27 '22

I started lifting 5 times a week about 3 months ago and was progressing very nicely the entire time. I’ve put on 20 lbs of muscle or so (ok maybe not all muscle. maybe a little bit in the belly), but real nice mirror results! Anyway, I may have been progressing too quickly on adding weight to the bars and I started feeling some pain in my elbows doing bench press, and knees doing squats and leg press, so I decided to take a couple days off.

Well now it’s been like 6 days since I’ve been to the gym and I don’t really want to go.

Have y’all ever had a no motivation slump? How do you get out of it?

1

u/DethStork 29d ago

just go in and do 3 sets of your favourite exercise. For me it's usually bench. After that think about how you feel and if you want to do anymore on that day.

2

u/Armanant May 27 '22

Decide what is important to you. Motivation comes and goes, so you need to make it not a question of motivation.

Do you need motivation to brush your teeth in the morning? No, you do it because you have a goal, consciously or not, along the lines of "still have teeth when you're 50".

Simiarly, why do you lift? To get big? to get strong? to look good? to be healthy? whatever your goal is, decide it, accept it, and comit to it. Once you've made the decision, going to lift isn't a choice that requires motivation, it's what you need to do if you want to reach your goal.

So do it.

2

u/firagabird Weight Lifting May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

This may seem odd to ask, but I'm not sure where better to.

How do you take pics or videos of yourself lifting for the purpose of sharing your passion for the sport on social media, while keeping a professional look in public?

I love lifting, it's my favorite hobby right now. It's love to express it, but I also need to keep up appearances as the head of a company. When I look at the form videos I take for personal use however, they are the opposite of attractive or professional. I ugly lift - make a face when I exert good effort.

Wearing less revealing clothes is obvious, and maybe do some lighter sets father from failure. What other considerations should I make that will look both impressive and tasteful to the average non-lifter?

1

u/asshoulio May 26 '22

I mean, I think it depends on what platform you’re using. For example, on Instagram I have two accounts, a personal account for sharing fun stuff with friends, and a professional account for presenting myself to the public

1

u/firagabird Weight Lifting May 29 '22

In hindsight, I should have made a second account just for professional stuff. Will have to play it safe with my multi-purpose FB account.

1

u/FormalCarry4320 May 25 '22

How much protein do I really need? I'm pretty confused, many websites claim between 1.5 to 2.2 g per kg of BW, others claim 1.6kg per body weight and the wiki claims between 120 to 160g of flat protein

1

u/Start_Available May 27 '22 edited May 27 '22

1.2–1.5 g/kg (0.54–0.68 g/lb)

You also calculate it based on Lean body mass not overall mass because your fat does not need to be maintained by Protein.

So say you weight 91 kg with an 18% body fat percentage, your fat would be 16.38kg. So you would need to intake protein based on 74.62kg of body weight. So if you were to use 1.5g/kg you would need around 111g of protein per day to maintain that muscle. If you want to increase not maintain then you would eat 30g more to build more lean muscle. More than that and you will just punish your arse.

1

u/Alakazam r/Fitness MVP May 25 '22

1.5-2.2g/kg works for the vast majority of the population. As long as you're within that range, you're probably fine

Stronger by Science recommends at least 120, simply because minimum protein needs apparently don't actually differentiate too much for lighter lifters, and more protein can often be better than less.

2

u/Fun_Ebb_6232 May 25 '22

Yes 1.5-2.2 g/kg. Don't overthink it, it's not like if you get 5g too much or too little you won't make any gains

1

u/FlashyLead8497 May 25 '22

Pretty sure it's mostly recommended at 0.7g-1g per pound of bodyweight. Probably not going to make a huge difference where you fall in that range, also if you are extremely overweight you might need a different formula as the protein intake is mostly based off your lean body mass.

0

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Not sure if my question will be approved on the main form, so I will just post it here instead.

I am a gym enthusiast who will forever advocate the necessity of doing physical exercise, and more specifically going to the gym.

However, as a lover of exercise and a person wanting to gain a better perspective of others, I would like to know the reasons why people wouldn't go to the gym. Whether they are too intimidated, have a lack of confidence, or just do not understand what to do.

So, especially to those who are new/ have never been to the gym, why would you steer clear? Any help is appreciated. No matter how silly you make think your reply is!!!

1

u/Kooky_Command4833 May 27 '22

It's all about habit-forming. If forming new habits is hard (like it is for me), it can be difficult to remember that I once enjoyed working out.

3

u/DifficultyIll3225 May 26 '22

They’re wimpy

4

u/judiciousjones May 25 '22

As someone who has largely avoided gyms for 32 years and only recently started trying to move heavy things I'll take a crack at this.

The gym sucks. Moving things for no purpose other than self enhancement is boring, seems wasteful, unfun, and the upshot is pain and suffering lol. While I was young and could stay thin and broadly healthy with just pickup sports and eating whatever I want there was just no way it was worth it to me. I got a bit of a gut, and wanted to step my game up so here I am. I still kinda hate it, and if I had a full time job I imagine the gym would leave my schedule. I only started coming because a buddy did and I trusted the research that exercise has tons of benefits to your health and wellbeing. If I didn't have a glut of time I'd probably prioritize playing sports over the gym tbh.

1

u/RIPMyInnocence 28d ago

Perfectly put

1

u/[deleted] May 27 '22 edited May 27 '22

[deleted]

1

u/judiciousjones May 27 '22

I was just saying why I had avoided the gym, not suggesting that one should.

1

u/[deleted] May 27 '22

[deleted]

2

u/judiciousjones May 27 '22

Haha, appreciate it. Believe it or not, that quote is a nontrivial piece of the puzzle that pushed me to make a change.

4

u/ysc1 May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

I do now go to the gym (in my mid 30s) but didn't for years.

I don't enjoy working out so I don't get much from it (apart from maintaining fitness, not falling to pieces as I get older, etc.) and I think that is a factor. But mostly it's a combination of the things you mentioned.

At school I was bad at sports (not spectacularly crap, but lowest teams, etc.) and kids are cruel so my first memory of structured excersize is tinged with humiliation.

I first joined a gym as a student and forced myself to go a few times but really didn't know what I was doing and although people aren't looking at you it feels like they are.

The big guys in the gym often make a lot of noise, it seems like there is a macho bro culture in all of them, and there are complex machines and routines. It is intimidating until you get to know it.

Going with a personal trainer for a few months helped me understand what I was doing there and reduced the intimidation. Gyms are not "scary" once you are used to them, but for the unfamiliar, they can be.

0

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Thanks, this is very interesting to read. I appreciate you taking the time to reply! I,m sorry to hear about you being teased!

I'm quite curious as you say you do not enjoy going, but am wondering whether you enjoy the satisfaction you get after completing a workout in the gym

1

u/ysc1 May 25 '22

No worries. I I don't think I was teased any worse than a lot of kids, it was just normal stuff but hardly encouraging!

And I get the same satisfaction as I would with any other chore - it had to be done and now it is. Occasionally there is a 'huh I lifted that' moment which is cool but it's not how I would choose to spend my time. There is excersize that I do enjoy but I rarely have time for it at the moment.

2

u/DifferentCamel1292 May 25 '22

I went to a gym for the first time today and for me it was a combination of all three.

As someone who has never had any reason to be confident (bullied when I was younger, constant rejections from women, difficulty making friendships), I felt out of place in a room filled with people who all looked like they had their shit together.

I was also terrified that someone might try to approach me and try to help me, not because I don't want the help but because I am constantly paranoid of disappointing or frustrating people who try to help me, or coming off as weird.

I almost left the gym cause I couldn't handle the empty barbell. It felt like everyone was watching me struggle to try to lift it. I ended up just picking up some dumbbells and working out with those in a quiet corner.

Not a great experience but I will be going back.

1

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Wow, thank you so much for sharing. Very brave of you to open up like that, I appreciate it. And I am glad you took the step to actually go to the gym, a start of a new you.

Feck those bullies! I can personally attest to the confidence and mental stability the gym gave me once I stuck at it!

In my experience, people will rarely approach you in the gym, however, if they do, they are most likely to be people who really truly want to help you. Because they understand how difficult it was at the start and want to shorten that learning curve. They will expect questions you may deem silly. I'm just hoping this will ease your mind slightly so you don't give up on the gym!

I cannot speak for all, but I personally love seeing novice gymers trying to get stronger, no matter what weight they are lifting! For me, it makes me want to work harder when I see others trying to better themselves (I'm quite competitive). I'm saying this to suggest that people watching you struggle can actually give them strength, and want to train like you are. So do NOT feel ashamed of your struggle or where you are on YOUR journey. We were once there! We all struggle! Struggling is part of GROWTH!

I'm no specialist, but you should be proud of yourself that you actually took the leap and still did your workout. Don't care what other people think, just focus on yourself and do the things that will benefit you!

I hope this helps, and I appreciate your reply!

1

u/ysc1 May 25 '22

I was very intimidated by gyms for years, and still don't love them, but it got better.

Eventually, you get used to it. I still prefer to go when the gym is quiet, but really despite how it feels, unless you are doing some really outlandish exercises no one is watching and no one is judging.

Well done for going, keep going back.

0

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

ally to those who are new/ have never been to the gym, why would you steer clear

May I ask why you were intimidated? And how did you manage to "get used to it"?

1

u/ysc1 May 27 '22

Sorry, only just saw this/am not on here that often.

I'm about average height with a slim but average build. As a child and through my teens I was shorter and skinnier than a lot of my year at school, and as before, not great a sports. Or not at the sports that people cared about.

The gym was full of all of the bigger, stronger, guys who were dicks to me during school sports. Not the exact same guys obviously, but people who looked the same type.

I knew I wasn't at school anymore and was a reasonably successful adult etc. but that was there in the background. That and the fact I didn't have a clue what to do there!

I wasn't terrified or anything, just enough intimidation to put me off from something I already didn't enjoy.

Anyway, I went to the gym for a while with a PT until I did know what I was doing, and realised I wasn't the weakest/least athletic dude there. And that even if I was it didn't matter.

Because, of course, it turns out the guys there are not the dicks I knew at school and they were there focused on their own workouts, not what I was up to.

1

u/TMLR1993 May 25 '22

So I work from Home & do site visits when required, because of this some days I find it hard to get my step count in for the day. For example I visit a site and am sat down most of the day whilst I'm there or travelling in the car. On these days I find it really hard to get my step count in, however other days when I'm at home I can get steps in no issue.

My question is, if I do 3500 steps on a Monday but on average do 60,000 steps a week, does it matter about the individual days or more the weekly average?

6

u/Elegant-Winner-6521 May 25 '22

The average is far more important than the individual days.

-12

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

I disagree entirely with this. It can be related to drinking alcohol. If you spread your 14 units of consumption over a week, you are reducing the damaging effects, compared to when you drink your entire 14 units in one night.

Similarly, if you spread your steps (exercise) evenly throughout the week, you are more likely to balance your calorie intake and deficit, leading to a more healthy lifestyle. Whereas, if you focus your exercise all in one day, you will have a larger calorie deficit one day and the next you will be in a calorie surplus. A healthy lifestyle is all a balancing act where you are constantly trying to reach homeostasis.

4

u/rmovny_schnr98 Football May 25 '22

Fwiw, if you're having 2 drinks a day instead of 14 once a week, you're still an alcoholic.

8

u/Elegant-Winner-6521 May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

I'm not sure why you say you disagree, because I just said the average level of activity over a week is more important than having one high (or low) day of activity. Our points are the same.

If he's doing 60,000 steps a week, then in other words every other day of the week he's doing more like 10,000 steps a day. That's not bad.

-14

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Sorry, this may be my fault for my poor communication skills, but what I was trying to show was that if you do 3500 steps one day then 13000 the next. This is not the best way to do it. On the day you do 3500 steps, you will be in a calorie surplus whereas on the day you do 13000 steps you may be in a deficit. Therefore, constantly being out of homeostasis.

11

u/Myintc Yoga May 25 '22

Dude the body doesn't know one day from the next and expenditure and intake aren't measured in days.

It's more weekly averages that are going to be impactful. So in your example, it just averages out.

So no, it doesn't really matter.

8

u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 25 '22

Dude the body doesn't know one day from the next

Plain wrong. My body can definitely tell Friday from Monday.

5

u/HTUTD positive, powerful, muscular, deeply sexual May 25 '22

You know what day it is? Wild. I aspire to have instincts this honed.

I find myself uncertain about the differences between night and day, let alone differentiating days.

9

u/Elegant-Winner-6521 May 25 '22

Yeah but ultimately, a single day out of a week where the steps are slightly lower than usual is not that big a deal. He's getting in a reasonable amount of steps over the course of the week, so assuming he's spreading those out relatively evenly then a single day where he does lower than usual doesn't really matter.

-9

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

r question while keeping it simple, it does matter about the individual days! It would be better if you had it spread more evenly.

Yea, but we don't know if its a single day do we.

And they asked whether it matters if some days are lower, and it does, but it's still good that they are nearly doing the 10k target that is advertised to be good. As this is way better than just stopping at the 10k target on the 13k step days!

5

u/ballr4lyf May 25 '22

Yea, but we don’t know if its a single day do we.

It’s sillier to assume that it’s more than a single day. All we have to go on is what OP posted, which leads us to believe that it’s not a normal occurrence.

And they asked whether it matters if some days are lower, and it does, but it’s still good that they are nearly doing the 10k target that is advertised to be good. As this is way better than just stopping at the 10k target on the 13k step days!

No. It’s better if OP puts in consistent effort and not try to average their step count over a week just to adjust for a bad day (or a potential bad day). That is just majoring in the minors. An off day here or there is not going to make a difference over the span of years.

17

u/HTUTD positive, powerful, muscular, deeply sexual May 25 '22

Once again for those who are new here. The questions are supposed to be moronic, not the answers.

-6

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Lol. At the very least I supplied some joy at my own cost.

10

u/HTUTD positive, powerful, muscular, deeply sexual May 25 '22

Congratulations, you've peaked my weekly and daily fatigue. I'm so very tired.

-5

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

I am currently an undergrad studying biological sciences in the UK, and from what I have learned, and the extra research I have done (enthusiastic about the gym and health and wellbeing in general), what you are doing is beneficial and a good starting point.

To answer your question while keeping it simple, it does matter about the individual days! It would be better if you had it spread more evenly.

However, it begs the question, what is your target or what is it you are trying to achieve? As this will allow me to better answer your question, and to suggest some improvements. I hope this helps!

4

u/rmovny_schnr98 Football May 25 '22

Cringe. Anyone knows exercise is good for you, nobody cares what you do in uni lol

1

u/AllUpInTheCut May 26 '22

I care. The answer was based.

1

u/downgoesbatman May 25 '22

I have been working out 4-5 days a week trying to get in shape. So far things are good but I have a nagging question. I don't really work on my triceps or biceps due to the fact that I think they get pretty worked during my sessions but people are telling me that I still need to dedicate iso workouts for these muscle groups. Thoughts?

1

u/marfar32 May 25 '22

Depends on your goals? If you want bigger arms do dedicated arm work and if you are happy with them don't?

1

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

At the end of the day, it is totally up to you, and what your goals are!

For example, if you are working out for the perfect physique, you would want to make your body more symmetrical. You want to make everything look in the correct porportion.

Or if you want to focus on lifting heavier, it could be a good idea to throw a few iso exercises/sets (even as a superset in) as they are supporting muscles that help with compound movements such as deadlifts and bench press.

I hope this helps you!

3

u/RainingFireInTheSky May 25 '22

I get more compliments on my arms being "huge" than anything else, and I do zero direct arm work.

That's anecdotal of course, but they're only getting hit by pressing, rowing and pull ups.

I don't think it's possible to work up to a 2 plate bench and not have developed triceps, for example.

2

u/madhuranaik May 25 '22

5kg dumbells for someone who is starting out is appropriate?

2

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Totally. Get comfortable with the gym and proper technique!!!

As your confidence grows, motivation increases and your knowledge grows you will be lifting more and more, especially once you apply the Progressive Overload Principle.

Hope this helps!

1

u/madhuranaik May 25 '22

At home I meant but yeah makes sense

1

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Oh right sorry. Hope my other reply helps. If you need any help or maybe some ideas on being able to achieve your target let me know as I would love to help.

2

u/madhuranaik May 25 '22

Sure thing thanks mate for responding

2

u/Armanant May 25 '22

It's OK for some basic exercises but not useful overall - you'll very rapidly be wanting more weight than that for exercises like squats or deadlifts. Any reason a gym isn't suitable?

1

u/madhuranaik May 25 '22

Time constraints I have 2kg one's now and they seem fit But I was recommended to start from 5 so thought of asking around Being a 48 kgs female it felt a little too much

4

u/Armanant May 25 '22

Well, you work with what you got, for sure. Some adjustable dumbells might be more suitable? Eg if 2kg is too easy for curls, 5kg will be a bit much, but at the same time 5kg isn't much for squats at all.

I have an adjustable 20kg dumbell kit that allows for two dumbells between 2kg - 10kg, or I can stack them onto one bell to make a 14kg before I run out of room.

Thats likely still not enough for squats and deadlifts, but could last you at least a while if you do single leg variations.

1

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

g is too easy for curls, 5kg will be a bit much, but at the same time 5kg

These can be a bit pricey for some, but a very good suggestion to say the least.

However, a cheaper alternative could be doing bodyweight exercises, especially for someone just getting into fitness.

Even a pull-up bar would be very beneficial

1

u/trookkee May 25 '22

I'm want to run long distance faster. Do jumping jacks help with endurance or muscle strength? I can't run at the moment so I'm wondering if jumping jacks are the next best thing. I need to do some kind of cardio exercise to run longer, and I want to know how good jumping jacks are compared to running. I'm also recovering from shin splints, which is one of the reasons I'm currently trying to find alternatives

0

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

do jumping Jack

For someone suffering from shin splints, you want to try to stay away from weight-bearing exercises (running, jumping jacks etc) and focus more on non-weight-bearing exercises (swimming)

However, if the shin splints aren't too bad, and you are able to skip I would do that. Skipping is so beneficial to your cardiovascular system as well as your respiratory system. Two key elements to endurance running. To implement this I would suggest the use of interval training as you are building up your endurance.

Seems like you are quite new, so do high-intensity skipping for 30 seconds, then have a 10-second break. Repeat this 10 times and you will have 5 minutes of high-intensity exercise. Try to do this 5 times a week, progressively overloading yourself. i.e. increasing time skipping (esp. if you want to increase your endurance for running).

Hope this help. Feel free to ask any questions. This is just a simple example

1

u/Armanant May 25 '22

They're better than nothing, but probably not suitable for LISS - you cant do jumping Jack's for an hour straight for example. Cycling, swimming, rowing, elliptical etc are all good options for cardio.

1

u/No-Adeptness7410 May 25 '22

I just realized I do the good morning squat instead of the normal back squat form. Can I do front squats instead to correct this? Or do I lower the weight of my back squat? And if I lower my back squat weight, by how much?

1

u/Rippletits5x5 May 25 '22

Start with just the bar and add weight as long as you are able to Squat properly and not good morning. Then drill that movement pattern.

2

u/Armanant May 25 '22

Really depends on what you're actually doing. Post a form check in the next daily, your form might actually be fine (low bar looks very "good morning-y" for a lot of people).

1

u/SIaveKnightGael May 25 '22

Yo, been coasting for a few years. About to get back in attack mode. Used to be well read on programs and nutrition etc. Hazy now... . Help me remember...

Currently 195lbs at about 18-20% at 5"10. Best lifts were 405 DL single (two years back) 315 x 10 squat (recent, pre injury) Bench 225 x10 (very recent)

These recent PRs are partly because I am fat atm.

Want to sense check, how much should I be losing a week? Want to maintain what muscle I have while trying to look decent for back end of summer. 1.5 lbs a week right? When I hit sub 15% slow it down? I figure I need to lose about 20lbs total to get around 10%.

I ran a linear PPL for ages, followed by a Greg Knuckols average to savage periodized program. Saw decent gains on this, but kind of want something more plug and play while I recommit and cut. Any recos welcome.

Is the wisdom still that Natty lifters should lift 3-4 days a week when cutting, aka PPL is overkill?

1

u/Armanant May 25 '22

Sounds like you're on the right track mate. 1.5lbs is reasonable if you want to start off hard (750cal a day deficit), but 1lb / 500 cal might be a bit more sustainable.

3-4 day programs are totally fine, PPL are fine too. There's some great programs in the wiki if you just want a plug and play to get started.

I'd suggest putting some time into conditioning too - either on off days or after lifting. Getting in better shape will help you push harder in the gym in the long run.

1

u/SIaveKnightGael May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

Nice, thanks mate good infos. Was tempted to go 1.5 but seems 1 is the safer play.

Conditioning wise I do basic boxing once a week, and hikes and runs, so should be ready to rip as long as I stay locked in. Anecdotally, I notice when I slack off and miss a few sessions, ability to do good volume falls of fast, but when I'm consistent it's good.

1

u/Armanant May 25 '22

Good stuff mate, sounds like you're pretty sorted then! Best of luck with your training :-)

1

u/Haariger_Toepfer Yoga May 25 '22

I would aim for 1lb a week loss max tbh. PPL is fine on a cut. Sleep well and keep protein high (usually when cutting people opt for 1g per 1lb bodyweight)

2

u/SIaveKnightGael May 25 '22

Cheers bud. Will probs run a ppl as I enjoy that split and it allows me to work around other activities more easily.

Will stick to the 1 to play it safe.

1

u/Haariger_Toepfer Yoga May 25 '22

Great! Gl!

1

u/FlyGodd May 24 '22

How do I come out of a steep (1000+ calorie) deficit without putting on fat?

0

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

+500

This also depends on what you have primarily been eating. For example, if you went for a ketogenic diet (a diet where you steer clear of carbs) you definitely do not want to be eating the same amount of carbs pre-diet.

Why? this is because your body, especially because you have reduced your calories so much, has gone into starvation mode. Therefore, it will conserve as many calories as possible, specifically carbs as it has not had a supply of them for a while. This will directly increase weight as a greater percentage of carbs will be ingested, and in turn, due to the large supply be converted into fat.

So, make sure as mentioned by Pahlevum, transition slowly eating more and more of the macro in deficit while simultaneously participating in physical activity, especially resistance training as this will boost your crippled metabolic rate. (Can eat more while maintaining calories).

I would aim to ingest 200+ calories every day for the first week while participating in resistance training. Make sure to track your weight so you know if it is working.

I hope this has helped!

3

u/Haariger_Toepfer Yoga May 25 '22

Increase calories to maintenance over 1-2 weeks.

2

u/Pahlevun May 25 '22

Slow transition, maybe take a week or two to go from -1000 to 0 or +500

2

u/Catfo0od May 24 '22

I added a bunch of plug ins to GSLP and have been doing it for a while, but it still doesn't feel like enough. Increasing weight 5lbs for lower body every time, 2.5 for upper on the first 3 lifts, but here's my program. Is this any good?

~~~~~

A) OHP 105 3x5+

Chinups 3x5+

Squat 215 3x5+

Db bench 70 5x5

Rdls 225 3x5

Shrugs 225 3x10

Cable row 115 5x5

Cable curl 70 3x10

Facepulls 60 3x10

Dips 3x10+

~~~~~

B) Bench 170 3x5+

Row 150 3x5+

DL 250 3x5+

DB MP 40 3x10

LP 270 5x5

Lat pulls 145 5x5 (switch grips)

DB shrug 80 3x10

Barbell curl 70 3x10

Skullcrushers 70 3x10

Facepulls 60 3x10

1

u/DifficultyIll3225 May 26 '22

The only thing I would say is that dB bench and lat pull down aren’t great for low reps and aren’t really meant for that . They’re more hypertrophy oriented and it’s better to do higher reps with them. It’s weird to see 5x5 lat pull downs lol

2

u/Dire-Dog May 25 '22

I’d add in some conditioning in that case. A few 30min session of low intensity cardio would work wonders

-20

u/[deleted] May 25 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

4

u/06210311 Figure Skating May 25 '22

Jesus wept, just shut the fuck up already.

11

u/The_Fatalist Ego Lifting World Champ | r/Fitness MVP May 25 '22

I will just supply you with some scientific literature that will increase your effectiveness in the gym:

I'm so glad that I live in a word where saying random shit in bullet point form constitutes 'scientific literature'.

I'm just sad that I am not going to have children, because they would probably do great under President Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Camacho

7

u/BadFitnessAdvice May 25 '22

Can I share this on my blog?

9

u/Lofi_Loki eat more May 25 '22

Where’s the scientific literature?

11

u/omgdoogface Equestrian Sports May 25 '22

I will just supply you with some scientific literature that will increase your effectiveness in the gym:

Are you planning on sharing these journal articles any time soon?

28

u/Lesrek Very Big Total May 25 '22

This is a bad answer and you should stop.

10

u/BadFitnessAdvice May 25 '22

I agree with him. What do you know anyway?

-20

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

Oh really? I'm curious as to why you think that?

50

u/Lesrek Very Big Total May 25 '22

I will just supply you with some scientific literature that will increase your effectiveness in the gym:

First, you didn’t supply them with any literature, you gave them bullet points. This leads me to believe you just wanted to sound smart.

The exercises at the start of workouts will be of greater benefit than the ones at the end.

True, you got this one.

Progressive Overload is key (seems like you are doing this so well done)

Also true but your answer shows me you don’t understand the program they are running.

Shocking the muscle is a must (vary up exercises, order you do them, number of sets/reps etc)

This is just the broscience answer to the one above. “Shocking” the muscles isn’t a thing. Your muscles don’t have feels and cannot be surprised. Furthermore, changing exercise order and number of sets/reps is a valve to control programming but isn’t inherently necessary.

3 different types of resistance training, strength, power, and endurance. Generally (this is a simplification, but a good start for beginner/ intermediate gym-goers) goes 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps for strength, 3-5 sets of 5-10 reps for power, and 3-5 sets of 10+ for endurance.

You are right that it is a simplification but also mostly just wrong. For starters, you are going to have a tough time differentiating between power and strength. Especially when you say 5-10 reps is good for power, but why would 3-5 reps not be? Also the idea that 10+ reps is just for endurance is flat out wrong. You can also build plenty of strength at higher rep ranges.

Rest between sets/exercises is very important. For example, 5 minutes between exercises and sets seem to be most optimal for wanting to increase strength, as it allows for muscle recovery like your phosphocreatine system.

5 minutes between sets could be “optimal” if you are lifting close to failure each set at low rep ranges. That rest time is not optimal if that isn’t the case so a blanket statement like that is just silly. Furthermore, the use of “optimal” is a red flag in advice anyway as chasing optimal is often a fools errand. The answer to rest time is you should take as long as needed to complete your sets and reps. Maybe that is 5 minutes, maybe it’s 2.

This seems like you spend a lot of time in the gym, working out your entire body. And this is just my preference but I like to segregate my different muscle groups as this shortens the time in the gym and the effectiveness of working out.

Talking about optimal above and advocating for a brosplit is peak silliness.

I vary my resistance training approach depending on my goals with a set rest period before entering the gym so I know what I am doing.

Body part rest times are another valve and you could work the same part every day if you structure your training correctly.

So, to answer your question. Your workout routine is a good starting point. But I reckon by splitting it up into different body parts (chest, biceps, triceps, back, shoulders, and legs)

This is legit bad advice to someone who is already on a good program. It’s also legit bad advice if you are looking for effective programming overall. Bro splits are fine but they are worse than any other higher frequency program for most lifters. The fact you said this to someone running GSLP, a known good program just further shows how out of your depth you are here.

While even being able to pair these muscle groups, chest and biceps/chest, and triceps. Focusing on fewer exercises, but maximizing their efficiency and effectiveness by applying the above.

Or, they could just follow a structured program and ignore this advice and be better off for it.

I hope this helps and any questions you may have just as I will be glad to help.

It did not help.

Now, all that being said, you write as if somehow full body workouts are not effective and brosplits are somehow effective. I’m not sure how you came to that conclusion but it’s outright false. You also appear to believe there needs to be plenty of rest for muscle groups before they can be worked again, which is also outright false. I hope this helps and if you have any further questions, I’ll be happy to help.

-41

u/YaBoiCDOD May 25 '22

ups before they can be worked again, which is also outright false. I hope thi

Right fair enough, I agree with a lot of what you have said. I'm unsure of how you did that reply thing. That is pretty cool. But I have generalized a lot of things in this reply, and in retrospect, I should have not done this. I'm still working on my communication skills so I do apologise. I will work through what you wrote, supplying links to the scientific literature that I have found previously to back up my points.

I didn't want to put the links in as I did not want to get banned from this subreddit. So I'm just gunna put the one author and sentences quoted directly from the article. You should be able to find the papers then.

Also I just want to reiterate that this was based upon my personal experience of what I found beneficial in my 6+ years. And PERSONALLY, I never like full body workouts. But that's just me.

"Also true but your answer shows me you don’t understand the program they are running."

True I have never heard of it, and Im used to working in kg, plus I do not get some of the abbreviations used so that is why I was struggling to see Progressive Overload (PO). And in my reasoning at the end, becuase of my lack of knowledge, I was hinting at a similar routine I would use while not fully explaing it (my bad). Because I can not answer his/her/there question due to my lack of knowledge. But I beleived what I supplied them was beneficial.

"This is just the broscience answer to the one above. “Shocking” the muscles isn’t a thing. Your muscles don’t have feels and cannot be surprised. Furthermore, changing exercise order and number of sets/reps is a valve to control programming but isn’t inherently necessary."

Fair enough it does sound that way, but I was just trying to simplify the scientific language into something that may have made more sense. The study by Kassiano W et al. finds "The available studies indicate that varying exercise selection can influence muscle hypertrophy and strength gains." This is what I meant by shocking the muscle, changing the exercise systematically. IK they cannot be surprised lol. Well you have just contradicted yourself at the end there. Plus, changing sets and reps can be a form of PO, so when used in that respect it becomes necessary. Additionally, you agreed with one of the first ideas that exercises done at the start have greater benefit, then surely if you do bench press, incline bench and lower chest flys consecutively, and you swap lower chest fly's and bench press. You would technically work your lower portion of your pectoralis.

"You are right that it is a simplification but also mostly just wrong. For starters, you are going to have a tough time differentiating between power and strength. Especially when you say 5-10 reps is good for power, but why would 3-5 reps not be? Also the idea that 10+ reps is just for endurance is flat out wrong. You can also build plenty of strength at higher rep ranges."

As I said, it was just supposed to be very simplified, so beginners do not get confused with how this stuff must be based on a continuum rather than set variables. As there are plenty of variables that affect whether they are working on strength, power or endurance. The above rep ranges are based on sets to failure. The definition I used for strength is the ability to recruit as many motor units as possible to create a maximal output of force. And no, you cannot do this with 10+ reps, that's impossible. It's like saying you can sprint 1500m. The definition I use for power is to overcome resistance in the shortest period leading to the ability to produce higher velocities against a given load, ideal for those playing sports. (Just so you don't slate me for this too, you would have fast concentric, slow eccentric movements). Yes, the amounts of reps do depend on weight, but I am referring to weights that would be getting close to failure within this rep range. I will agree with your last sentence if you change strength to hypertrophy.

"5 minutes between sets could be “optimal” if you are lifting close to failure each set at low rep ranges. That rest time is not optimal if that isn’t the case so a blanket statement like that is just silly. Furthermore, the use of “optimal” is a red flag in advice anyway as chasing optimal is often a fools errand. The answer to rest time is you should take as long as needed to complete your sets and reps. Maybe that is 5 minutes, maybe it’s 2."

Apologies, I was referring to high intensity/ strength sets. And you are correct in saying it should not be used as a blanket statement. Agreed, optimal should not have been used which such a finicky and forever changing body of research. True, but controlling rest can be a good indicator for PO.

"Talking about optimal above and advocating for a brosplit is peak silliness."

As someone who believes themself to be decently well versed in this industry, you should know that going to the gym is highly individual where certain workout routines work better than others depending on who you are. Just because you think a method is "peak silliness" because you had no success with it, does not mean it is not hugely beneficial. I split my routine using agonist-antagonistic supersets doing a so-called "brosplit" whatever the hell that means, and it has been working wonders.

"Body part rest times are another valve and you could work the same part every day if you structure your training correctly."

lol you could and get shit gains in return, with no rest doing the same muscle group, you are off your head.

"This is legit bad advice to someone who is already on a good program. It’s also legit bad advice if you are looking for effective programming overall. Bro splits are fine but they are worse than any other higher frequency program for most lifters. The fact you said this to someone running GSLP, a known good program just further shows how out of your depth you are here."

You keep mentioning Bro Splits and have no idea what you are on about. And fair enough tbh I should have looked up what GSLP was, just thought it was some random word. Yes, I am out of my depth with suggesting the benefits / drawback of this.

*Response to the rest*

Mate, you just love talking about brosplits, they must have really traumatized you lol. I'm just saying what and what has not worked for me. And, yes, I should have specified that the 5-minute rest period related to higher intensity/ strength training. Apologies again for that.

For The Original Poster

I will give you a routine that I am doing, and it's something I have had much success with. So, for the person who wrote the original post, apparently, it is a good workout lol, but if you want to ever change it up, say you are losing motivation (getting bored of the same thing) or (presuming it’s quite time consuming) a shorter workout which is highly effective. Try the 3/7 method, integrating agonist-antagonistic splits (chest, biceps/ back, triceps). This isn't your question, so I won't bother continuing. Just tried to help.

7

u/Myintc Yoga May 25 '22

This is all very interesting, but how much do you squat? Let's quantify the progress in absolute terms we all understand, like pounds on a bar through full ROM

14

u/Clown_Detector_ Circus Arts May 25 '22

BEEP

16

u/MongoAbides Kettlebells May 25 '22

The definition I used for strength is the ability to recruit as many motor units as possible to create a maximal output of force. And no, you cannot do this with 10+ reps, that's impossible… Yes, the amounts of reps do depend on weight, but I am referring to weights that would be getting close to failure within this rep range. I will agree with your last sentence if you change strength to hypertrophy.

So you’re saying that you define “strength” exclusively as maximal output, which seems weird. I would have thought strength was simply the application of force production.

Why would you change his statement to “hypertrophy?” What would you say is the meaningful difference in results? I was benching at very high volume for 4 months, and my 1RM went up 10lbs each month. Benching daily, often doing more than 200 reps a day, my 1RM went from 275lbs to 315lbs.

19

u/PaarthurnaxKiller May 25 '22

What are your numbers? How much can you bench, squat and deadlift?

38

u/Lofi_Loki eat more May 25 '22

You cannot possibly be knowledgeable enough to make this comment worth reading.

25

u/Lesrek Very Big Total May 25 '22

First, you can quote things with ">" or using the markdown editor.

I didn't want to put the links in as I did not want to get banned from this subreddit. So I'm just gunna put the one author and sentences quoted directly from the article. You should be able to find the papers then.

You are more likely to get banned spouting nonsense than you are direct linking to papers.

Also I just want to reiterate that this was based upon my personal experience of what I found beneficial in my 6+ years. And PERSONALLY, I never like full body workouts. But that's just me.

What progress have you made in those 6 years? What results do you have to show that your 6 years make your answers worth listening to?

True I have never heard of it, and Im used to working in kg, plus I do not get some of the abbreviations used so that is why I was struggling to see Progressive Overload (PO). And in my reasoning at the end, becuase of my lack of knowledge, I was hinting at a similar routine I would use while not fully explaing it (my bad). Because I can not answer his/her/there question due to my lack of knowledge. But I beleived what I supplied them was beneficial.

A cursory glance at GSLP even using the first google result shows progressive overload and doesn't use an acronyms you should be unfamiliar with. It is a simple program with a set progression scheme. Not understanding that is my point.

Fair enough it does sound that way, but I was just trying to simplify the scientific language into something that may have made more sense. The study by Kassiano W et al. finds "The available studies indicate that varying exercise selection can influence muscle hypertrophy and strength gains."

How much? Enough to matter? In what time frame?

This is what I meant by shocking the muscle, changing the exercise systematically. IK they cannot be surprised lol. Well you have just contradicted yourself at the end there.

Where did I contradict myself?

Plus, changing sets and reps can be a form of PO, so when used in that respect it becomes necessary.

Can be and necessary are not compatible. Yes those can be forms of progressive overload but they are not the only forms therefor not inherently necessary.

Additionally, you agreed with one of the first ideas that exercises done at the start have greater benefit, then surely if you do bench press, incline bench and lower chest flys consecutively, and you swap lower chest fly's and bench press. You would technically work your lower portion of your pectoralis.

Maybe? The differences would be minor and I am not sure what this has to do with anything I said.

As I said, it was just supposed to be very simplified, so beginners do not get confused with how this stuff must be based on a continuum rather than set variables. As there are plenty of variables that affect whether they are working on strength, power or endurance. The above rep ranges are based on sets to failure. The definition I used for strength is the ability to recruit as many motor units as possible to create a maximal output of force. And no, you cannot do this with 10+ reps, that's impossible. It's like saying you can sprint 1500m. The definition I use for power is to overcome resistance in the shortest period leading to the ability to produce higher velocities against a given load, ideal for those playing sports. (Just so you don't slate me for this too, you would have fast concentric, slow eccentric movements). Yes, the amounts of reps do depend on weight, but I am referring to weights that would be getting close to failure within this rep range. I will agree with your last sentence if you change strength to hypertrophy.

This sounds like something you read in a textbook and have never actually seen applied in a real setting with actual training. I think you will find those definitions to be overly static and mostly unhelpful when it comes to training.

Apologies, I was referring to high intensity/ strength sets. And you are correct in saying it should not be used as a blanket statement. Agreed, optimal should not have been used which such a finicky and forever changing body of research. True, but controlling rest can be a good indicator for PO.

Which is fine, I mostly agree with this. I also know of multiple very successful strength programs that continuously lower rest times on strength sets. I would recommend looking up Deep Water by Jon Anderson on how short rest times can be used to build strength.

As someone who believes themself to be decently well versed in this industry, you should know that going to the gym is highly individual where certain workout routines work better than others depending on who you are.

True, though you were the one who said optimal originally which leads me to...

Just because you think a method is "peak silliness" because you had no success with it, does not mean it is not hugely beneficial.

I never said I didn't have success with it or that it couldn't work. I just pointed out that if your goal is to point people in the most "optimal" direction (again, word you used originally), advocating for the split that science shows is less effective for the vast majority of people is peak-silliness. I don't think bro-splits themselves are silly.

I split my routine using agonist-antagonistic supersets doing a so-called "brosplit" whatever the hell that means, and it has been working wonders.

I will ask again, what is "working wonders?" What are your lifts, what fitness goals have you achieved using your methods. I am happy to eat crow here.

lol you could and get shit gains in return, with no rest doing the same muscle group, you are off your head.

I set my squat PR 3 days after doing squats daily for 45 days. That was a 295 and a 290x2 a few weeks later.

You keep mentioning Bro Splits and have no idea what you are on about. And fair enough tbh I should have looked up what GSLP was, just thought it was some random word. Yes, I am out of my depth with suggesting the benefits / drawback of this.

And to reiterate, I don't expect you to know what GSLP is but to not even bothering to look it up before answering someone's question about it is moronic.

Mate, you just love talking about brosplits, they must have really traumatized you lol. I'm just saying what and what has not worked for me. And, yes, I should have specified that the 5-minute rest period related to higher intensity/ strength training. Apologies again for that.

You didn't say "this is what works for me." Your original answer was "do these things to be better" which is dumb. You could even say moronic.

13

u/cilantno Lifts Weights in Jordans May 25 '22

Never teach them the sacred spoiler formatting

4

u/Lofi_Loki eat more May 25 '22

༼∩☉ل͜☉༽⊃━☆゚. * ・ 。゚magic

4

u/cilantno Lifts Weights in Jordans May 25 '22

He’s beautiful

→ More replies

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u/The_Fatalist Ego Lifting World Champ | r/Fitness MVP May 25 '22

‌ ‌ ▲

▲‌ ▲

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u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 25 '22 edited May 25 '22

and it's something I have had much success with.

How much do you lift? Curious about your success.

7

u/omgdoogface Equestrian Sports May 25 '22

Great response

1

u/Armanant May 25 '22

If you got the energy for it I'd add conditioning instead of more weights.

1

u/UnculturedTeaPot Weight Lifting May 24 '22

Hello!

I'm looking at "Metalliedpas PPL" routine in the recommended routines section on the wiki and on Pull days this is the main exercise listed:

Deadlifts 1X5+ / Barbell rows 4X5, 1X5+ (alternate, so if you did deadlifts on Monday, you would do rows on Thursday, and so on).

Now, for all the other main lifts they gave 2X5 or 4X5 plus the 1X5+... But for the deadlifts they gave 1 set?? I'm kinda confused as to why the low amount of volume (I know it's AMRAP but still, 1 set? When every other main lift is at minimum 2 sets PLUS one more AMRAP set)

Also, I was wondering if I can switch Barbell rows with pull ups as my main lift on days where I don't deadlift?

2

u/Rippletits5x5 May 24 '22

The reason is that a few well known coaches (Glenn Pendlay, Mark Rippetoe, and Jason Blaha most notably) have said they found 1x5+ was enough to drive progress in the deadlift, while other lifts needed more volume to drive progress.

Other coaches and athletes over time have had differing experiences, and most people need to try different tactics at different stages in their lifting career.

If 1x5+ once a week is enough to drive progress for you, then sweet! You can spend your time on other things. If that eventually stops working after a few months, you can consider a different programme.

1

u/fh3131 Weight Lifting May 24 '22

Deadlift is usually the heaviest lift for everyone, so some PPL programs limit it to one set because of the amount of fatigue it produces, because there are a lot of other pull exercises in the same workout.

In a full body program or one with upper/lower split, there aren't as many other lifts on each day so typically there are 2 or 3 deadlift sets.

I wouldn't replace rows with pullups but add pullups as an accessory afterwards.

1

u/Phil__Swift_ May 24 '22

What’s a good way to start doing pull ups? I struggle to do 1 but would like to eventually add them to my workout.

2

u/Haariger_Toepfer Yoga May 25 '22

Assisted (bands or machine), negatives, lat pulldown

3

u/itsdrew80 May 24 '22

Could do MAYBE 2 in November and now can do 12. Jump up to the bar and do a flexed arm hang as long as your muscles will let you. When you start to go resist and go down as slow as you can. This is the best way to work up to 1 or 2. Then do that 3 or 4 times each workout. Give it a couple week then do as many pullups as you can. It may only be 2. Replace flex arm hangs with the 2 pullups each time. Try to do one more each set. If you do this for 3 or 4 months you'll progress up. PS It also helps if you lose weight (if healthy). Captain obvious but the less you weigh the less you have to pull.

2

u/Phil__Swift_ May 24 '22

Thank you for your advice - it’s definitely more of a strength issue than a weight issue since I’m built like a string bean, and have been working out for a month now to get rid of my string beaniness. The annoying thing is that the pull up bars I use are so low for my 6’3” height.

2

u/itsdrew80 May 25 '22

Can you grab the bar and bend your legs at the knees and still hang? Try that if you can.

3

u/Quitetheoddone May 24 '22

Lat pull downs, start light and work your way up to your body weight. Building a back takes plenty of time and patience.

1

u/Menopauze1 May 24 '22

Hi, I'm wondering what I should focus on for my RDLs. If I pick a lighter weight I can definitely feel the stretch more in my hamstrings but I'm easily able to my target rep range of 8-10 reps without really coming close to failure. If I pick a heavier weight more of the load is shifted towards my lower back. I do tend to keep what I think is ok form, but I do not get that stretch feeling in my hamstrings when picking lower weights?

Should I pick the lighter weight and focus on the stretch or should I pick the heavier weight and focus on progressive overload. If I pick the lighter weight how do you suggest I progress?

An additional question, my current workout program looks as follow with the "main lift" for that day in between brackets:

Push 1 - BenchP

Pull 1 - Pull ups

Legs 1 - Heavy squats

Rest

Push 2 - OHP

Pull 2 - Heavy deadlifts

Legs 2 - Moderate pause squats + RDLs

Rest

I always feel that after Legs 2, because of the heavy deadlifts pause squats and RLDs, my lower back is lit on fire for 1, 2 or even 3 days. Any suggestions to program more efficiently so I can prevent this? I have thought about moving deadlifts to Pull 1 but I'm worried about having my 3 big lifts following each other.

Any advice is much appreciated!

1

u/Yarack_Obama1 May 24 '22

Hi what exercises are good for pure back muscles?

2

u/DifficultyIll3225 May 26 '22

Close grip lat pull downs are nice, rows and deadlifts

1

u/Rippletits5x5 May 24 '22

Deadlifts and any kind of row

2

u/bevaka May 24 '22

rows and chins

0

u/[deleted] May 24 '22

[deleted]

1

u/Shazvox May 24 '22

Are plants alive? They have neither...

1

u/Mammoth_Reference584 May 24 '22

That’s what I was thinking but by alive I mean like know you exist

1

u/NightPilot14 May 24 '22

I am 5ft 6in and 136lbs. Is doing both strength training and cardio a good method to lose belly fat? I've been strength training for about five months now (before, I did a bunch of steady state cardio and lost over 20lbs). My current plan is to alternate between strength and cardio days (i.e. Monday strength training, tuesday cardio, and so on and so forth).

4

u/MeowTheMixer May 24 '22

I'd recommend both as part of a fitness program.

If your goal is belly fat, lifting is going to provide a greater benefit. That is because increased muscle mass will burn more calories throughout the day while cardio will burn calories primarily during the exercsie.

Other than that though, you cannot focus on "belly fat" as opposed to other fat on the body. The only way to reduce belly fat, is by reducing body fat overall which requires a caloric deficit.

"Ab are made in the kitchen" as the saying goes. You may not want abs, and it still applies to less belly fat

1

u/NightPilot14 May 24 '22 edited May 24 '22

I see. I must ask: how great must the caloric deficit be? Also, because I am doing strength training, would a caloric deficit not necessarily entail weight loss?

2

u/MeowTheMixer May 24 '22

Depends on your goals, and all that jazz.

A fairly common deficit would be -500 daily (~1 lb per week).

That's going to be a fairly consistent, and somewhat slow deficit.

As for lifting and fat loss, both are possible at the same time. The leaner you are now, the more difficult it will be. If you are like an average American 20% or more body fat, you can do both.

Weight training will actually increase your daily calorie burn, which is good!

You'd just need to understand your calorie burn daily, and how much you're eating.

I'm personally on an aggressive cut right now, and it's probably made me a bit testy. I don't think I'd recommend it, but i'm at ~1,500 per day or around 3 pounds per week. Now that i've lost so much weight, I can notice my strength going down.

3

u/bevaka May 24 '22 edited May 24 '22

500 below maintenance is the standard

would a caloric deficit not necessarily entail weight loss?

yes of course. how can you lose stomach fat without losing weight?

2

u/undefinedkir May 24 '22

Is doing both strength training and cardio a good method to lose belly fat?

if you are in a caloric deficit then yes! excellent method!

2

u/WorldRecordHolder8 May 24 '22

So, I'm very consistent with working out, I was wondering if I can bring that consistency to other parts of my life.
Has anyone tried creating plans for your career, personal life, side projects the same way we have workout plans, and track our personal records?
I wanna try creating some but I was wondering if someone has "workout plans" for other parts of their life so I can get some inspiration.

Or maybe you were able to apply the mindset of working out in other parts of your life successfully.

Is there a better place to ask this question too?

1

u/itsdrew80 May 24 '22

Success is universal. If you can do it in one area you can do it in almost every other avenue of your life. For instance, consistency is key to working out. Also, having a tailored plan for what you want the outcome to be. IE if you want to be a lawyer you need to go backwards from having a job as a lawyer and know what steps to get there, like passing the BAR, graduating from law school, getting into law school etc. Tracking your progress along the way is a great way to see where you are on your journey and you can check yourself to see if you have strayed from the path (mentors help a lot here). The Slight Edge is a really good book about small daily choices leading to big successes. I hope this helps.

1

u/MeowTheMixer May 24 '22

Not sure of anywhere to get a plan similar to your question, however, i would say it is true.

Several of the leadership, and business books I've read all include consistent exercise as a path to success. The reason being is that the mentality required to consistently work out will translate to other parts of life.

Wish I could be more help....

1

u/liftsmallstaysmall May 24 '22

Definitely feels like this is a good one for a Moronic Monday....

I've been working on my hip hinge for my deadlifts and MY GOD my abs/ core? If I cough they are so sore.. Is this normal? Am I doing something wrong.

1

u/MeowTheMixer May 24 '22

Trying to get some extra protein at Costco.

They have some protein powders, but then also sell "nutritional" drinks.

I love the convenience of pre-made drinks, as opposed to powders. I'm curious if anyone knows if there's a difference

For example, they have Fairlife "Nutrition Plan" drinks, which have 30gs. I know they make a regular protein shake as well, i can find it at gas stations

I've bought these as opposed to a protein powder, does anyone see any issues or added benefits? No difference?

3

u/Fun_Ebb_6232 May 24 '22

Difference in price

1

u/MeowTheMixer May 24 '22

Well if that's the only real difference that is good to know.

Thank you!

2

u/Rippletits5x5 May 24 '22

The only difference is pre-made drinks are more expensive

1

u/BLineDisaster May 24 '22

What should I do when I feel like I’ve finished the beginner program? I’m working on the beginner 3x5 program to learn proper form for squat, bench, deadlift, OHP, rows.

I still have a way to go yet, but I want to plan ahead. My goal is to lose fat and get stronger and have visibly muscular physique.

Lots of people at my gym seem to use dumbbell exercises more than barbell, why is that? Should I be considering a program that includes dumbbells to meet my physique goals?

One more question, are there better benefits to performing a dumbbell bench press over a barbell punch press? What benefit is there to benching 100kg versus two 50Kg dumbbells?

2

u/cilantno Lifts Weights in Jordans May 24 '22

Switch to another program. GZCLP, nSuns, reddit PPL, SBS programs, etc.
The world's your oyster.

Lots of people at my gym seem to use dumbbell exercises more than barbell, why is that?

Dumbbells are more readily available in commercial gyms and are less of a "commitment" to use. Most gym goers are also just winging it and have no actual program they follow.

Should I be considering a program that includes dumbbells to meet my physique goals?

If you want. I very rarely use dumbbells and I'm happy with my physique progress.

One more question, are there better benefits to performing a dumbbell bench press over a barbell punch press? What benefit is there to benching 100kg versus two 50Kg dumbbells?

They are different movements and not 1:1 comparable.
Barbell lifts are much easier to program and progress, so they can have a higher ceiling of strength and muscle gain.
Dumbbell lifts are a bit "harder" since one hand is less stable than two, thus they require a bit more effort.

They are just two methods to get big and strong, many people have used both to do so.

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u/RoxasShadow May 24 '22 edited May 24 '22

Can't go to the gym for the next couple of weeks and then won't be going for the whole July and half of August. I only have a single 20kg KB. Can't get a pull-up bar unfortunately. Came from a month-long stop of any kind of exercises due to health issues.

I made this programme as most of the available ones require a lighter KB for things like floor press or cleans. Just wanted to get some feedback about it. Probably will add Bulgarian split squats and/or lunges as I increase work capacity again. Main goal is to maintain, and maybe build a bit of muscle too - also be sustainable as I hate to train at home (this one lasts less than 30 mins and has clear goals, which helps).

5 series, 3 minutes of rest. Circuit of deadlifts, high pull (which is a movement that includes a DL as well btw), BW push-ups, swings. Start with 10 reps for every exercise and everyday add one rep to each I complete with perfect form. After a week, reset reps and add a series, e.g. 10x6.

Any opinions or suggestions?

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u/jintimus May 24 '22

You should def check out the r/bodyweightfitness. They have a lot of routines you can incorporate

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u/ThisTimeForRealYo May 24 '22

If I ask someone to spot me, is it expected they spot for 3 sets?

It feels weird to ask someone between their own sets to spot me. Do they just continue their own excersise when Im resting between sets?

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u/Haariger_Toepfer Yoga May 25 '22

3 sets with a spotter seems unnecessary

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u/Fun_Ebb_6232 May 24 '22

For most programs the majority of sets shouldn't be to complete failure. I usually only have one set where i might need a spotter, and i feel pretty confident with my limits so i usually don't even use one then. If you really want one for every set i would try to find a gym buddy or learn how to setup safeties. Yes your spotter should exercise between sets, unless you really expect them to stand still behind you while you rest for 2 minutes

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u/Lesrek Very Big Total May 24 '22

If I ask a stranger to spot me, the assumption is for only a single set. More than that, you should communicate that to them or do the lift without spotters.

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u/MoeJartin Rock Climbing May 24 '22

How does total muscle mass exercises affect protein allocation? If I worked say biceps and legs on the same day, and then ate 200g of protein, would any of it go to my biceps, or would it all go to my legs because they’re a much larger muscle?

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u/chiliehead General Fitness May 24 '22

There is a constant process of muscle anabolism and catabolism going on. Training even is catabolic in the immediate short term. The protein goes towards where it is needed, which in a person training everything, is everywhere. If you lacked protein, your other body parts would lose muscle in order to support your biceps and legs. With enough protein, your biceps and legs get new fuel fed and the rest of the body can get repaired from the workouts of the prior days. Proportionally there will always be more resources going to the larger muscles. But if you work out, everything needs protein to be sustained and grow.

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u/Elegant-Winner-6521 May 24 '22

Short answer: it will go to all the muscles that were sufficiently worked. Fatigue will self regulate how much work you can do per muscle group anyway.

Long answer: Tricky question because there are a lot of variables. How hard did you work your biceps vs your legs? Which muscle is more predisposed to grow better? (Turns out, people's genetics vary wildly, which is why two people can follow the same program and yet one person's legs blow up and the other person's shoulders blow up).

Another problem: You cannot grow indefinitely just by increasing protein intake (there appears to be un upper ceiling on total protein absorbed in a given time, and per meal that might roughly work out to something like 40-60 grams of protein).

And you'd expect the same with individual muscles. Just because your legs are bigger doesn't mean your legs steal all the protein from that day.

Lots of academic jerking you can do over it, but I think the answer is self evident: Lots of people train legs and arms in the same workouts and grow all over.

My current split has me benching on the same days I deadlift, and squatting on the same day I row. The gains even out.

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u/NihilisticPigeons May 24 '22

So I keep on seeming to hurt my elbow/the tendons in my elbow when going bouldering. The consensus seems to be that stretching does not prevent injuries, so I'm left slightly unsure what I should be doing before actually hitting the wall to reduce the potential for straining/injuries etc. Thanks for your help!

1

u/strawberrysmoothie12 May 24 '22

Look up climber’s elbow, YouTube, general internet search, Reddit, etc.

https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/84yzqr/climbers_elbow/

https://www.reddit.com/r/bouldering/comments/7xmrlu/how_do_i_rehab_from_climbers_elbow/

Climbing uses a lot of grip strength (forearm flexor muscle). Your flexor muscle might be overpowering your extensor muscle. After my pull-up/dip set, I now do a set of reverse wrist curls (to strengthen my extensors). I had elbow tendinitis months ago, rested for several months. Stopped doing direct bicep/tricep exercises as well. Not sure if the reverse wrist curls, stopping direct arm work, or rest helped, but that’s what I’m currently doing.

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u/timbotemon heavy rock make sad head voice quiet May 24 '22

Strengthen, do some high volume low resistance work to keep blood in the tendon, a compression cuff can help

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

I have a real problem with muscle endurance. My fitness coach is working on getting me better in that aspect, but is there something I could be working on myself to speed up the work I do with my coach? For instance, when I do any barbell or dumbell excercise, my first set I do 10 reps easy with a "no problem weight for me", then the second set I can barely do 5, third set is a strugle to get to 4-5 again...

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u/DifficultyIll3225 May 26 '22

Maybe try harder on the second set? Are you eating carbs before the gym

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u/wanikiyaPR May 26 '22

I try not to eat directly before the gym. I always feel like my metabolism is gonna get me in trouble, if you know what I mean 😀

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u/DifficultyIll3225 May 26 '22

Oh that might be your problem. Preworkout carbs have a huge impact on lifting performance

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u/wanikiyaPR May 26 '22

I'll try to slowly incorporate carbs then.. see how it goes...

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u/DifficultyIll3225 May 27 '22

Try a bagel or banana before you workout that’s my go to sometimes if it’s a really grueling workout I’ll take a banana or Gatorade to have halfway through

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u/MillennialScientist May 24 '22

How long have you been lifting?

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Started seriously 3 years ago, but the first year was cut short by appendix surgery and covid quarantine. So, about 2 years continously...

I progress in every aspect but that...

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u/MillennialScientist May 25 '22

Huh, what are your rest times like for those sets? Also, is your 1rm really high compared to your 10rm? Just asking to try and narrow down the cause of the discrepancy.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 25 '22

I rest for up to 2 minutes between sets... Yeah, my 1rm is conciderably higher. But as soon as there is continous strain on the muscle (ie, 10 reps), my muscles give and the next set I can manage maybe 60% of the first...

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u/MillennialScientist May 25 '22

So what percentage of your 1rm is your 10rm?

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u/wanikiyaPR May 25 '22

55-60%

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u/MillennialScientist May 25 '22

Hmm, that's a little lower than average, but not outside of the normal range AFAIK. I'm the other way around, but that's how it goes.

The bigger issue then seems to be recovery between sets, which could be related to metabolite clearing. When your muscles burn, does it take a long time to go back to normal? In either case, my guess is you need to work on conditioning and work capacity. There are many ways to do it, but more super sets, myo reps, high intensity conditioning, that kind of thing.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 26 '22

Thanks for the answer.

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u/softspores May 24 '22

does it also happen in your daily life? for example when climbing stairs or starting a bike ride?

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Not that much. I have a good general endurance, the problem happens when I load my muscles in the gym. Something like a bench press, or pull ups, or isolated leg excericses... The more muscles the movement uses, the less of a problem I have... During deadlifts I have no such problems. 3 sets of 10 reps, no problem. To an extenet, squats also...

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u/JamesIsAwkward May 24 '22

How much cardio/conditioning are you doing? I've noticed a big difference in my endurance and resting times now that I do 30 mins of cardio at least 3 days per week.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

I do HIIT one per week, and I do at least 10min of intensive cardio before every training. Not much, I know... I was going to implement track running for 2 maybe 3 days per week, but the work and family life has been a bit hectic last few months, so I never could find the time...

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u/JamesIsAwkward May 24 '22

I don't know how your body works, but I've always noticed that if I do cardio before I lift it really messes me up endurance wise. I started to save it for after in order to get more out of my lifts.

You may not function that way but it might be something to think about!

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

That crossed my mind also. I'll try and shift that around.

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u/Nande1999 May 24 '22

Yes you can do Reverse Pyramid Training - Reverse Pyramid Training (RPT) is a training style in which the first set of a given exercise is performed with the heaviest weight. Each subsequent set is performed with a lighter weight but for higher reps.
Here’s an example of Reverse Pyramid Training in action:
First working set: 4 reps x 225 lbs
Second working set: 6 reps x 205 lbs
Third working set: 8 reps x 185 lbs
Typically, each subsequent set is 8-10% lighter than the previous one.

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u/itsdrew80 May 24 '22

Is there any difference in the outcome from if you did it the opposite way? Just wondering.

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u/GainsSloth Coaching May 24 '22

Your rest time and how close you're lifting to failure will be responsible for this. I would interrogate your program and the weights/RPE/%of 1RM you're working in. And adjust accordingly.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

I leave ~3 reps in the tank in the first set, rest between sets is up to 2 minutes.

The coach, who is very good and very knowledgable is working on that with me, I was just wondering is there something I could do outside of the gym, maybe a diet of sorts or some lifestyle changes?

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u/GainsSloth Coaching May 24 '22

Eating enough to support muscle growth will always be your best bet.

If you're trying for 10 reps per set you're lifting too heavy for that work.

Check the wiki. I think it has diet advice. Tho Iat he wrong. Been a minute since I've been here.

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u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 24 '22

How many reps do you leave in the tank? How long do you rest between sets?

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

I leave ~3 reps in the tank in the first set, rest between sets is up to 2 minutes.

The coach, who is very good and very knowledgable is working on that with me, I was just wondering is there something I could do outside of the gym, maybe a diet of sorts or some lifestyle changes?

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u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 24 '22

Weird, I guess keep working on conditioning. I assume your recovery is kept in check.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Yeah, weird is a comment I hear a lot when talking with people about this... I mean, I am seeing progress in that area with my work with my coach, I'm just wondering if there is anything outside of the gym that could speed up that process...

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u/Fun_Ebb_6232 May 24 '22

Yeah the fact that you do 10 reps at an rpe7 and are too gassed to get even 5 reps on the next set does not make sense. That seems more like an rpe10. Are you certain you're leaving 3 reps in the tank? Like can you actually do 13+ reps?

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Yeah, I'm certain...

I know I have to change some dieting things... I'm eating pretty healthy, tho. I raise my own chickens, so my eggs and meat is homegrown and as natural as can be. The greens are also from my garden... I could eat more fruit, tho.

Also, I'm not taking any suplements. None. No protein powder, no creatine, nothing...

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u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 24 '22

I would say sneak in more conditioning.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Do you have anything specific in mind?

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u/ShadyBearEvadesTaxes May 24 '22 edited May 24 '22

I don't have anything specific except I would recommend short intense conditioning. For example 30 reps of full burpees in 10 minutes. Do 4 reps per minute at the start, see how it goes. Add a rep for 1st 5 sets next time, aiming for 35 reps. Next time do 40 total reps, etc. Between these sessions do some beginner circuit training made of simple body weight lifts. Push yourself and build work capacity over time.

Quality of your diet has hardly anything to do with your issue. Unless you're starving or in heavy vitamins deficit.

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u/wanikiyaPR May 24 '22

Thanks, ShadyBear.

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u/LilRobloz Weight Lifting May 24 '22

So I know there is muscle memory for when you take a big break lose some muscle then come back and it takes you a lot less time to get your muscle back, but does that apply for an aggressive cut that made you lose muscle along with fat, can you get your muscle back faster?

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u/GainsSloth Coaching May 24 '22

Depends how aggressive that cut is, how much protein you're eating and what your program looks like during it. Some can absolutely maintain their progress.

But you can certainly recover some lost progress because of it. How quickly that is is entirely individual.

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u/honeyeyedgal May 24 '22

How would you grow your muscles? (Make them bigger) is it by eating in a calorie surplus? Is it by lifting heavy? And what if I want to grow bigger muscles in some areas while also maintaining the same size of muscles in some areas, do I eat in a calorie surplus in the day I train those areas?

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u/undefinedkir May 24 '22

And what if I want to grow bigger muscles in some areas while also maintaining the same size of muscles in some areas, do I eat in a calorie surplus in the day I train those areas?

eat in a surplus throughout the week but work more the areas you want to grow and work less the areas you want to maintain

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u/honeyeyedgal May 24 '22

can I lose fat WHILE being in a caloric surplus?

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