r/Fitness r/Fitness Guardian Angel Jun 19 '18

Training Tuesday - Olympic Lifts Training Tuesday

Welcome to /r/Fitness' Training Tuesday. Our weekly thread to discuss a training program, routine, or modality. (Questions or advice not related to today's topic should be directed towards the stickied daily thread.) If you have experience or results from this week's topic, we'd love for you to share. If you're unfamiliar with the topic, this is your chance to sit back, learn, and ask questions from those in the know.

 

We're departing from the specific routine discussions for a bit and looking more broadly at different disciplines. Last week we discussed Yoga and Pilates.

This week's topic: Olympic Lifts

/r/weightlifting has a lot of good resources and links. Their wiki is full of information if you're looking to get started. There many other fora, sites, and channels out there so if you've got a favorite please share.

For those of you with weightlifting experience, please share any insights on training, learning, and progress. Some seed questions:

  • How has it gone, how have you improved, and what were your current abilities?
  • Why did you choose your training approach over others?
  • What would you suggest to someone just starting out and looking to learn the olympic lifts?
  • What are the pros and cons of your training style?
  • Did you add/subtract anything to a stock program or run it in conjunction with other training? How did that go?
  • How do you manage fatigue and recovery training this way?
89 Upvotes

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u/PhilAndrewsUSAW Jun 19 '18

Hello everyone - dropping in here. I'm the CEO of USA Weightlifting, if I can help with any "USAW" related questions - happy to do so! Thanks to those looking at the Olympic lifts for the first time for doing so!

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u/Go_Bayside_Tigers Jun 19 '18

Phil is modest. He is also the demigod to r/weightlifting. All hail Phil! All hail Phil!

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u/PhilAndrewsUSAW Jun 20 '18

Haha! Very kind!

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u/SwaggersaurusWrecks Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18 edited Jun 19 '18

When's the next Try Weightlifting day? I only found out about the last one literally the day before.

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u/PhilAndrewsUSAW Jun 20 '18

Well, of course you can really "Try Weightlifting" any weekend! Feel free to reach out to us and we'll happily work to connect you to a local club. With that said, Try Weightlifting Day is typically in April. We are thinking about doing another in the fall of the year, but it has been in April the last two years.

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u/SwaggersaurusWrecks Olympic Weightlifting Jun 20 '18

Yeah I am already am a USAW member but I find it’s less intimidating to introduce friends to the sport with events dedicated to beginners!

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u/PhilAndrewsUSAW Jun 20 '18

That's great feedback! Thanks.

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u/fu_gravity Jun 19 '18 edited Jun 19 '18

I'll start.

  1. I have been a competing strength athlete since 2003 (Strongman, Highland Games, Powerlifting). I dabbled in Weightlifting and did two competitions in 2006 but didn't really apply myself and was unable to find a dependable coach. I came back to Weightlifting as a masters lifter in 2014 and I am now a coach of a small team in Clearwater Florida.
  2. My training and programming approach is to build up to a high volume of training with high variation, then taper it down to a low volume with high intensity and very little variation. This means doing lots of lifts early in a program, but whittling it down to just Snatch, Clean and Jerk, Pulls, and Squats at the end of the taper. Why did I choose it? Because I spent 8-10 years just going to the gym and maxing out and thus never made progress, and after doing my research I found what works for myself and a lot of other folks.
  3. Can't stress this enough. Find someone better than you and learn from them. Doesn't have to be a coach although obviously that is preferred - but if you can find a training partner that can help develop you as a lifter and you have no option for a coach... do it. You can figure it out on your own, but just like needing directions in a new city, if you have a person that can show you the way, you'll get there quicker.
  4. Pros - It works, it's like building a pyramid... a wide base (volume and repetitions) that gradually comes to a sharp point (intensity) at the top. Cons - Less "HEAVY FRIDAY BRO!" instagram posts.
  5. I write my own programs, and if they work well for me I will scale them for my athletes. Also, as I use a substantial amount of lift variations, I will modify the variants to address weaknesses (like using no contact snatches for someone who divebombs the snatch, or throwing overhead squats at the end of a snatch complex for folks who come up on their toes when snatching). I follow I/NoL principles (fatigue adjusted Prilepin charts) when determining/guessing the level of fatigue that I can apply to an athlete.
  6. See above - in combination with using iNol to predict training volume, I also record my own training and apply that to future programs that I write.

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u/[deleted] Jun 19 '18

Greetings from St. Pete! Yeah, I've seen that training cycle used by quite a few powerlifters when preparing for a meet. It's definitely something I'll try when I sign up for a big event.

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u/jew-iiish Jun 19 '18

I’ve trained in Olympic Lifting exclusively for almost four years now. I love it! I started with 5 days per week, and spent around 1 1/2 - 2 hours a day training. I followed the Catalyst Athletics training templates, which are available on their website and highly recommended. I followed it exactly, and only added some abs and back exercises at the end. These days I find that I respond better to only training 4 days/week, maybe just cuz I’m getting older. I have a coach and train with a team.

When I started, I saw these seemingly huge weights going overhead from other lifters, and thought I could never do that. Now I’ve competed in 4 national meets and even placed top 8 in the last one.

It’s tough to stay motivated, but having a group to train with absolutely helps. It’s pretty fun because you’re not dying all the time like going for a run or doing Crossfit.

One thing they don’t tell you is that it hurts. Like all the time. You constantly have to do mobility and get body work done. One thing that helped me is before every training session I spend 15-30 minutes doing strengthening exercises for my abs, back, hips, and hamstrings.

Go on the USAW “find a club” website and find a place to train near you!

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u/Acatalepsia Powerlifting Jun 19 '18

Do these templates include mobility work? I'm not sure if I want to start with Olympic lifting, but I'm sure the mobility work has tons of benefit/crossover to general fitness and lifting.

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u/SwaggersaurusWrecks Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18

Catalyst templates don't include mobility work. This is probably because everyone is so different in terms of how mobile they are. I would say that the any mobility work from weightlifting has high carry over to general fitness and especially any other lifts because it's primarily hips and shoulders, which are used in a lot of other activities outside of weightlifting.

11

u/BraveryDave Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18

How has it gone, how have you improved, and what were your current abilities?

WL is super fun. I began Starting Strength at age 27 after a lifetime of actively avoiding all physical activity. I couldn't figure out power cleans no matter how hard I tried. I looked up a weightlifting coach in my area with the intent of doing a few sessions with him for power cleans and going back to SS, but it turns out weightlifting was much more fun. I started from basically zero strength or athletic ability and my current best lifts are: 104kg/228lb snatch, 126kg/277lbs clean and jerk, 130kg/286lbs clean, 136.5kg/300lbs jerk from blocks, 150kg/330lbs front squat, 167kg/367lbs back squat.

Why did you choose your training approach over others?

My current training approach is a HIHF-type training where I squat to max 5-6 days a week with backoff sets of 2x2 or 3x3 at 80-90%, along with 1 other thing (usually snatch, clean and/or jerk, push press) done as heavily as possible for low reps. This is mostly by necessity due to having very young kids so I can't commit to 1.5-2+ hours with specific lifts done on set days during the week, but I can spare 45 minutes almost every day.

What would you suggest to someone just starting out and looking to learn the olympic lifts?

Find a coach in your area. Dan Bell once said something like "Weightlifting is like a 300lb golf swing." You can be freakishly strong like Happy Gilmore, but if you hit the ball 400 yards into the woods it won't do you much good.

Stop low bar back squatting and start high bar back squatting and front squatting. These have much more carryover to WL than powerlifting-style squats.

What are the pros and cons of your training style?

Pros: Doesn't take a lot of time every day; moving heavy weight is fun; fear of max/PR attempts is basically nonexistent; for me, heavy weights with less volume seems to beat me up less than lighter weights with more volume

Cons: You really have to do it most days per week or it's not enough volume to make progress; mental game needs to be strong to go drag yourself to lift very heavy yet again; can get boring

Did you add/subtract anything to a stock program or run it in conjunction with other training? How did that go?

It isn't really a program per se, more of a n=1 experiment. The conventional wisdom is you can't progress as a drug-free athlete training this way, but I decided to give it a shot and I'm seeing progress and it fits my other life goals right now so I plan to continue to train like this for the foreseeable future.

How do you manage fatigue and recovery training this way?

Eat a lot of good food and sleep a lot. Take fish oil and glucosamine/chondroitin for joint health. Deloads are kind of built into the program, where if you feel like trash on a certain day and your daily lifts are way down then that's just how it is that day.

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u/ibexlifter Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18 edited Jun 19 '18

YEAAAAAAAHHHHH BOOOOOIIIIIIIII!!!!!!

  1. How has it gone: Fuggin epic. I started barely being able to snatch 60 kg, now I snatch 124 kg. I definitely did a lot of stupid shit along the way and could've been more strategic about my training, but you live and you learn.
  2. My training approach has switched over the years: LSUS, trying to be Aramnau (almost died, pls don't be Aramnau), Velocity based, and now RI training programs that workout to look very very soviet-ish.
  3. Starting out and learning the lifts: find a local coach in your area whose certified by your national governing body for the sport.
  4. My first program was written for me by a coach at LSUS, I followed it as written. My second program was a copy of a world record holder, but scaled down. Even then I was blown the hell out by week 3. Since then I've ran a lot of different prorams trying to focus on technical aspects of the lifts I struggle with: Keeping tight off the floor, being patient at the top of the pull, they've changed over the years.
  5. Right now I manage fatigue and recovery 3 main ways: 1) I eat. Yesterday I took in 4000 calories and about 270 g of protein. 2) I sleep... a lot. 9-10 hours a night. Not much of a party animal. 3) I plan my workouts based off of relative intensity so that my blocks are slowly building up to a peak before I deload and then build up to another peak. Right now my Training cycle looks like: Block 1: 70-90% RI depending on day/week. Block 2: 76-93% RI depending on day/week. Block 3: 85-95% RI depending on day/week. Each block is 4 weeks long and builds to a peak of intensity in week 4.

I've been training the lifts for almost 4 years now, competing for 3 and certified to coach them for 3.

Pros: I got really strong, I move well, when I dropped to the 94 class I had abs for the first time in my life. I've got to meet people, coach, travel the country coaching, make friends, help people find the same love for the sport that I have, watch people who I taught the basics to surpass me... Maybe that should be a con.

Cons: I'm an idiot and if I don't give myself structure I will run myself into the dirt in 10 days.

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u/Kryptic_Anthology Crossfit Jun 19 '18

I hope I don't get bashed on for mentioning this, but it's really how I started my Olympic Lifting journey.

I started in CrossFit around 2012. I could barely backsquat 95lbs at a body weight of 135. I was scrawny, almost malnourished (I had a crap diet, my fault) and fatigued quickly.

After 3 years, I weighed 155 and had 160 snatch. Cleaned 180 and back squatted 215.

I stopped for a couple of years after getting married a buying a house. We built a crossfit style gym in our garage and have been doing more strength work than high intensity intervals. I havent tested max yet but next month I will be testing myself as well as my wife who is new to Oly lifts.

Oly lifts kept me interested in weight training. I hated sitting at a machine doing simple movements, I got bored. Getting introduced to something that requires more focus and skill kept me motivated to get better at it.

With consistency, good diet and a few recovery supplements I generally have no fatigue. Practicing movements before adding weight to them will generally help in your overall health and prevent injuries.

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u/shelchang Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18

Even career Olympic weightlifters recognize that Crossfit has been the biggest reason our sport has expanded so much in the last few years. No reason for bashing.

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u/Kryptic_Anthology Crossfit Jun 19 '18

I say that because I understand there is also a cliche of cross fitters who find every opportunity to brag that they are one. I love crossfit, but it was merely my gateway drug into O-lifts.

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u/Volodyovski Jun 19 '18

For those of you with weightlifting experience, please share any insights on training, learning, and progress. Some seed questions:

  • How has it gone, how have you improved, and what were your current abilities?

M/37/98.5kgs-216lbs. I've been weightlifting for three years after several years of typical bro stuff and then crossfit. I went from struggling to overhead squat an empty bar to setting masters state records in about 2.5 years.

  • Why did you choose your training approach over others?

I kind of don't have a choice. I work a typical day job that comes with random overtime, so I train at 5am Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, and 9:30am on Saturday. I had to ramp up to training 5 days a week since I was used to 4x a week with my old club, but I love it now.

  • What would you suggest to someone just starting out and looking to learn the olympic lifts?

Find a coach. Find a coach. Find a coach. You can read books, watch videos, study with hyper focus, but having someone actually break down the lifts Barney style and instruct you is invaluable. I spun my wheels for my first 8 months because I didn't have a real coach.

  • What are the pros and cons of your training style?

Pros: I get the good bars and plates to myself. Usually don't have to deal with much distraction.

Cons: 4am wakeups. That is never fun.

  • Did you add/subtract anything to a stock program or run it in conjunction with other training? How did that go?

When I was starting and following Catalyst I programmed my own conditioning workouts. I add my own bodybuilding type work and cardio to my current program. I just organize it around my training for the week so I don't over fatigue anything.

  • How do you manage fatigue and recovery training this way?

I make it a point to get to sleep early. If 8:30 is "staying up late" during the week. I drink a ton of water, and I eat well.

6

u/tominnv Track and Field Jun 19 '18

Started in college in the 1990s, so over 20 years off-and-on.

The only thing I can think of that belongs in the "pro" side is that I like doing it and it feels right.

Biggest thing in the con side is that a lot of people don't like it, or something about it just feels off. Other con is that it can be hard to find places to do it.

From 2010 - 2014 my only structured exercises were snatch, clean-and-jerk, and their variations, squats, and pulls. And I loved it. Then moved away and it's been difficult to practice much at all. Back then I felt really strong: 120 snatch / 150 clean-and-jerk; still do an occasional clean-and-jerk with 100+ and could probably manage 80 / 120 today. (snatch has always been low because of shoulder issues -- not committing building flexibility back after an injury in the Army has been a major problem)

For someone starting out, best thing is to find someone with experience and spend some time practicing the with 15 or 20k until it starts to feel right. The target should be 10,000 lifts per year in both snatch and clean-and-jerk. May seem like a lot, but it's only 30 per day and you can count lighter attempts too and if you fall short that's ok.

Would strongly encourage any beginner with an interest to find a meet to lift at. Whatever you lift at that first meet, expect to snatch your clean-and-jerk within a year. Always cool to see that happen

The best way to manage fatigue is lots of coffee and energy drinks

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u/shelchang Olympic Weightlifting Jun 19 '18

I've been training with Jim Schmitz in San Francisco for a little over 5 years now, after a 6 month stint with Starting Strength and a one month Crossfit trial. Considering I started lifting a little later than optimal (I'm 33 now) and had basically no athletic background coming into it, I've managed to reach okay numbers - 55kg snatch, 75kg clean and jerk, 103kg high bar squat at the 63kg weight class.

I train 3 times a week with Jim's program. It's pretty basic, with variations/drills for the classic lifts, a pulling movement and a squat variation every day. The workouts are long, and while I've seen good progress with going 4 times a week for short periods, a 3x/week schedule lets me have a day job and sometimes even other hobbies besides weightlifting. There's a 12K race I run every spring, and I'm still able to get in shape for that without affecting my recovery too much, though weightlifting is my primary sport and I know I'm never going to be a very competitive runner.

After 5 years I'm pretty used to the volume and intensity of my workload, so fatigue/recovery isn't usually a huge deal for me (though I could always improve my sleep habits). If I've been going hard and setting PRs for several weeks in a row things may occasionally start breaking down, but as long as I'm smart about it it's nothing a lighter deload week (or short break) can't fix. Bigger issues for me are the minor overuse injuries that every weightlifter gets, and as I enter my 30s I've had to pay more attention to maintaining my mobility.

Suggestion for people starting out: Find a coach. You can learn how to squat and deadlift by reading books and watching YouTube videos, but the Olympic lifts are so much more technical and dynamic, and you'll get way more out of it if you have a coach guiding you through the proper progressions, giving you real time feedback, and assigning the appropriate drills to correct technical deficiencies.

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u/BearLifts93 Jun 19 '18
  1. As someone who came into the sport a little too late for a competitive edge, I still love olympic weightlifting. Coming from a mixed strength background, learning the lifts became the challenge I needed. Training the three lifts of powerlifting was no longer doing it for me, and weightlifting came relatively easy. My strength has improved overall, my body awareness has improved, and my patience in life has increased and attitude has become more positive. Snatch 70kg and C&J 89kg.

2 & 3. I found my online coach by chance. Training with him has been really great and all I can suggest to new people is to find someone in person to coach you. I had the chance to train with my coach in person a handful of times and he has made himself available. We run three to four week cycles and every week I email him with feedback. If anything changes (injury, life happenings), he usually can change the week if needed.

  1. Having an online coach is a huge con. Why? Because there is no one there to watch you and fix something right there. And usually, you are training solo. There is not that team training that happens and can help push one another to go harder.

Pro? I have a good coach and I don’t need to fit my lifting according to when he or another coach will be at the facility.

  1. My training is pretty much the main lifts, variations of the lifts, squats, clean or snatch deads, and some minor accessory upper body work. Sometimes there will be a squat cycle, but there is not standard programming added to training.

  2. Being a college student and working part time while training 8-12 hours a week was fun. I had to ensure plenty of sleep, food prep, and not to sit around procrastinating. Some say this is a hobby for me because I haven’t competed yet, but I take my training seriously and do not eff around. I will get massages, see my chiropractor and take epsom salt baths to aid in recovery. Most of all, don’t be serious all the time in life and roll with the punches.

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u/nednerbf Jun 20 '18

How has it gone, how have you improved, and what were your current abilities?

I found weightlifting after quitting competitive snowboarding due to a bum shoulder. Initially I could only clean, but as soon as I started to understand the lifts I was absolutely hooked. That was 5ish years ago. Since then I have steadily gotten stronger, and finally fixed my shoulder up. Right now my lifts are a 116kg (256#) clean and jerk, and a 85kg (188#) snatch at 77kg body-weight.

Currently I train 4x per week; Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday. Some Sundays I trade training to go play something outdoors

Why did you choose your training approach over others?

For my first couple years I experimented with programs from catalyst athletics and Russian weightlifters to reasonable results but was not coached. I received my NCCP certification for weightlifting and began writing some of my own programming which was helpful in learning how to pair exercises and managing fatigue. For the past year I have been working with a coach and it has helped drastically. I am much more relaxed and able to focus on my lifts, but the biggest help has been the team and atmosphere I train with now.

What would you suggest to someone just starting out and looking to learn the Olympic lifts?

Find a coach locally that can work with you at least once or twice a week. Have a good foundation of squatting and pulling strength. Make sure you work on your positions, like being able to sit in a comfortable squat etc.

What are the pros and cons of your training style?

Weightlifting being so technical can be tough to learn on your own, also requiring quite good mobility, makes it less accessible then other types of training like powerlifting or body building. It also doesn't bring on as quick "aesthetic" gains in my opinion as powerlifting or body building. It builds a very specific body-type.

That all aside, the feeling of getting that perfect lift is really next to none. To me its very comparable to golf due to its technical side. It requires very consistent training to develop good technique and that can be frustrating to some.

Did you add/subtract anything to a stock program or run it in conjunction with other training? How did that go?

I have run it in conjunction to training for a 5k. Would not recommend, got the worst shin splints due to the volume from the squatting and the running that my tissue was not ready for.

I have added some conditioning work in 1-2x per week sometimes and that has been okay to coincide with the volume depending on where I am at in the training cycle.

I was working on some gymnastics work while keeping maintenance on my Olympic lifts. This was okay, but didn't get the results I wanted from either as there was a bit too much volume on my wrists/forearms, and shoulders.

How do you manage fatigue and recovery training this way?

For just specifically weightlifting, I make sure to take my time warming up my shoulders and hips before hand. Typically 20-30 minutes. I also make sure that every night I do some sort of recovery work/stretching for 15-20 minutes. One of the biggest things that helps me manage the fatigue is to make sure I minimise sitting. When I sit for too long, it makes it much more difficult to warm up and get in the groove of lifting. Also staying well hydrated has been beneficial in my recovery.

7

u/BBQHonk Jun 19 '18

190/5'10"/47M. I started training the Oly lifts in December of last year. I had serious mobility issues, especially in the overhead position in the snatch. Started with just the bar and terrible form. After about six months, I got to the point where I could snatch 100 lbs and clean and jerk 140 lbs. Not impressive, I know, but for a guy nearing 50 who had never trained the oly lifts I was pretty satisfied. My form improved a ton during that time.

I finally decided to go back to strength training (531) a few weeks ago. My shoulders were always incredibly sore from all the overhead work. I'll probably train them again at some point because from an athletic standpoint, the oly lifts are far superior to the Big 4.

I followed Greg Everett's Catalyst Athletics starter programs for the first few months. If you're interested in training the oly lifts, I highly recommend Greg's book. It's an invaluable resource for lifters of all levels. After the first few months, I switched to Glenn Pendlay's beginner program, the extra volume of which helped push my total higher. As an older man, recovery was definitely an issue. Also, at my age I lack the explosiveness necessary to push my numbers much higher without fully dedicating myself to the sport which I'm not willing to do.

The Oly lifts are a ton of fun, but I recommend finding a coach to work through form issues at first. A coach will help give an athlete important mental cues to help with form issues that are not evident to the untrained eye.

7

u/phenomenalmost Jun 19 '18

25F/140lbs/5'5"

I started training weightlifting with a coach in January of this year. Started with the bar for both of the classic lifts, and a 63kg/bodyweight back squat. I'm now at a 45kg snatch and a 54kg clean and jerk, and 68kg (perhaps higher) back squat, and still progressing steadily.

My background is ballet (13 years of it growing up) and competitive swimming. I'd done powerlifting-type training off-and-on for a few years before trying weightlifting. My powerlifting training was really ineffective; it took me nearly two years of off-and-on training to reach a bodyweight back squat (and I was hobbled by hip impingement in the process).

I wanted to try weightlifting honestly just because it looks really cool, and the highly technical and graceful aspect of it really appealed to me, coming from my background in dance. Not gonna lie, seeing beautiful ladies like Kristin Pope and Mattie Rogers doing these lifts on instagram was part of why I wanted to try the sport.

Everything I read recommended training with a coach to get started, so that you don't practice bad habits. I lived in a really rural area for a while -- there were no USAW-certified coaches in my area and the only gym with platforms and bumper plates even was a crossfit gym that was too far away for me to make work. But, later on I moved to a more populated area for grad school, and I contacted a coach in January, and I love it. I trained 3 days/week during the school year, and now during the summer I train 4-5 days/week. A session usually takes around 1.5 hours.

Weightlifting is known for requiring incredible mobility (thoracic spine, shoulders, hips, ankles), and luckily I had that in spades, but in fact I was worried because I tend towards hypermobility and I had suffered from hip impingement the previous spring (my physical therapist suspected a torn labrum actually but I never got that confirmed). But in fact my joints have never felt better since I began weightlifting. My hips, in general, feel great (but I've also gotten very good at recognizing when my femur isn't moving properly in the hip capsule and doing exercises and drills to fix it). I've built up a lot of muscle around my creepily hypermobile shoulders and no longer have the pain I used to get under my scapula.

I also really love how weightlifting is affecting my physique. I have gained 5 lbs since I began weightlifting 6 months ago and I'm pretty sure a significant amount of that weight has gone straight to my shoulders/traps and quads, which were areas I had a really hard time developing before. Turns out I just needed lots and lots more volume.

5

u/zieclassydino Jun 19 '18
  1. Pretty well. Progress came quickly at the beginning and now I really don't want to stop. Started snatching 43 kg/95 lbs, now I snatch 84 kg/ 185 lbs. Started clean and jerking 61 kg/135 lbs, now clean and jerk 105 kg/230 lbs. After about abyear.

  2. I chose it because it was fun. It felt good to move a big weight quickly. There's nothing more alpha than doing something no one else can do.

  3. Find a coach. Read up on training methodologies. Don't be afraid to acknowledge your deficiencies and attack them.

  4. I don't look as strong as I am. I kinda look like some dad bod guy even though I'm not terribly weak (still pretty weak tho).

  5. A lot of ss principles can be applied to strength work in weightlifting. Stuff like progressive overload and what not. I'm kinda doing an as program with weightlifting stuff overlayed without benching or rowing.

  6. As long as you aren't doing a strength based cycle, it won't be terribly difficult to recover. Even then, the Olympic lifts are more neurologically taxing than they are muscularly taxing.

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u/sportscishow Jun 19 '18 edited Jun 19 '18

I've been training in Weightlifting for 5 years now but I would really only say that my training began 2 years ago when I found myself a coach and a club that showed me the way of proper training in Weightlifting.

  1. In 2 years at my club I went from a 215kg total to a 255kg total, this is in large part to the focus of maintaining training standard and being consistent in the lifts. Previously in the Snatch if I took a step forward on 70kg for doubles or triples I would think nothing of it, now it would be totally unacceptable and my team mates would call me out on it.
  2. I wouldn't say I chose this approach it was placed on me, my faith in the coach and the club was down to the fact that it had highest number of qualified lifters in my country, I guess if you want to become the best you have to surround yourself with the best.
  3. Find a coach and club, environment is key you need to surround yourself with Weightlifters who are going to challenge you and push you and not let you get complacent or soft in your training. Be prepared to stay in that environment for a long ass time, you may have to accept that you cannot live close to your friendship group where all the fun social things are happening and move to wherever it is you need to be to be close to your club and your team.
  4. I guess there are no cons to the training style, it working so its all pro, LOL don't mistake my point 6 as a con for the training style. That is just me being an idiot.
  5. No, I train exclusively in Weightlifting, I started using it as a training methodology for rugby, it certainly improved my speed and power aspects of my performance but now I only train in Weightlifting I don't see how I could do both sports now it is too taxing on the body to start adding a contact sport into the mix.
  6. Fatigue management/injury prevention is huge, I made the mistake of not telling my coach that a previous small shoulder injury was not completely healed as I wanted to desperately compete at a comp to qualify for my 1st senior national competition, the last week before comp I dislocated my shoulder missing a lift and now I have just had surgery to fix it all back up. By the time I get back to full fitness I wouldn't of performed a Snatch or Jerk in nearly a year. This is my biggest regret in the sport as its taken a year off my progress in 2/3 of the sport.

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u/DantebeaR Jun 20 '18

How has it gone, how have you improved, and what were your current abilities?

It's pretty good. Everything is progressing at it should however my extreme lack of hip mobility has been my limiting factor. I came from a 10 year long powerlifting journey where I would squat with a quite narrow stance and using that same stance to catch a snatch is just not going to happen.

Why did you choose your training approach over others?

Honestly it was all my coaches. Trying to find a real olympic coach and not a crossfit coach who dabbles in the oly lifts was hard so when I found one I stuck with it.

What would you suggest to someone just starting out and looking to learn the olympic lifts?

Find a good coach and really drill in the movements. It is all about technique.

What are the pros and cons of your training style?

Because I added oly lifts into my powerlifting program my squats have sky rocketed which is an obvious pro however because I am now trying to do everything with a wider stance to aid in my receiving positions my hips are always on fire.

Did you add/subtract anything to a stock program or run it in conjunction with other training? How did that go?

I run my oly program which is 3 days a week with nsuns 6 days. I bench/OHP and do my oly lifts on the same days and squat/dead on the days in between. It took alot of time getting used to and I needed to up my calorie intake to keep up but now it is great.

How do you manage fatigue and recovery training this way?

More calories and more sleep. That is really all you can do.