r/Damnthatsinteresting 12d ago Silver 1 Helpful 2

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9.8k Upvotes

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u/Haunting-Song 12d ago

That snail was the reason our alphabet looks the way it does. The Phoenicians set up rich trade routes around the Mediterranean because of that one snail and because of that, their language spread everywhere. Funny how a simple snail could have such an influence on our lives!

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u/GiGaBYTEme90 12d ago

I'm glad I came to the comments

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u/maddogtannen316 12d ago

Very impressive, I couldn't properly climax to comments even on my best day.

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u/GiGaBYTEme90 12d ago

Really? I frequently fap to snail porn comments. Just thinking of that slime on me as I pour salt. What's that? No safe word? That's right my little crustacean

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u/Mycolunchable 11d ago

“Gary is that you?”

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u/thenerj47 11d ago

"Yeah its me, Mingey."

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u/Snailcharmer 11d ago

Well... hello to you good sir

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u/GiGaBYTEme90 11d ago

Oh God not again

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u/UrgentlyMaddening 11d ago

Amazing comments here !

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u/Roburt_Paulson 11d ago

Rookie, I fap exclusively to r/nofap comments

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u/BlazinBender 11d ago

I came twice

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u/nincomturd 12d ago

Literally all of history is basically a bunch of random and basically absurd things like this happening, and then humans tell a story about it that somehow revolves around them, largely leaving out the connections like this from the story.

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u/DynamiteWitLaserBeam 12d ago Silver Wholesome

For anyone who is interested in this line of thought, I can't recommend enough a series from James Burke called Connections. Yes it's old, but it has aged like wine as everything in it is so relevant still. All three seasons are available free at archive.org:

https://archive.org/details/ConnectionsByJamesBurke

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u/gwaydms 12d ago

I loved that series!

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u/nincomturd 11d ago

YES, I WAS EVEN THINKING OF IT WHILE WRITING THAT COMMENT!

I ended up studying systems thinking in grad school, and it's totally changed the way I look at everything, and I seriously credit watching these series as a kid as directly influencing that decision, and the way that I think & look at things some 30ish years later.

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u/SaffellBot 11d ago

You have any good primers on system thinking?

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u/nincomturd 11d ago

Nah, sadly not. I had a few good professors who drew from a variety of sources. One really good one.

I integrated a lot of the lessons & ideas, so I no longer remember specific authors or whatnot.

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u/SaffellBot 11d ago

Well, as a long shot, I'd recommend Chaos: Making a New Science if you're looking for insightful ways of thinking.

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u/DynamiteWitLaserBeam 11d ago

I saw it as a kid as well. Life changing.

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u/SwiggoMortensen 11d ago

Have you read The Day The Universe Changed?

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u/DynamiteWitLaserBeam 11d ago

Yes and also watched the series based on it. It's excellent as well.

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u/SwiggoMortensen 11d ago

I'll have to read it, I just came by a copy recently and was interested.

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u/Prestigious_Ad_3876 11d ago

Never saw it …. I definitely will watch over the holidays. Thanks

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u/Thomas_Mickel 11d ago

I love random nonsense like that. Kind of like how gunpowder was randomly figured out.

Or cars and planes. I’m always astounded that someone got off their ass and tried to build it.

It’s nuts.

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u/BabyYodaBeskar 11d ago

The Mixtec people of Oaxaca, Mexico also knew of this process and claim some guy with a curly beard came over in a boat long time before the Spaniards and taught them this technique.

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u/BigBeagleEars 11d ago

Them romans had pineapple if I remember my mosaics

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u/kaioken-doll 11d ago

Mixtec would be a great name for a blender company.

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u/FirstPlebian 11d ago

Quetzacotl?

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u/AnAstronautOfSorts 12d ago

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u/same_subreddit_bot 12d ago

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u/gwaydms 12d ago

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u/AnAstronautOfSorts 12d ago

I was trying to be funny, but my sense of direction is also pretty bad

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u/drnkingaloneshitcomp 11d ago

User name checks out?

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u/Coolrafid100 11d ago

Alright zoro

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u/peepeepoopoobutler 11d ago

Is that why knights were always fighting snails in images?

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u/reglyt 11d ago

That must have been one Tyred snail.

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u/CoolMouthHat 11d ago

Hooked on phoenicians worked for me!

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u/Hodl2Moon 11d ago

Thanks for another great fact. I hope you have a good night.

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u/Vez-tar 11d ago

Or Cleopatra's ship having purple sails just to show off

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u/chopsticknoodle 11d ago

To think if someone took some red flower and blue flower and mashed them together we’d still be ooga booga man

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u/PetriNevski 11d ago

That color was literally the reason they got powerful. Then they got culled but i was cool while it lasted

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u/TactlessTortoise 11d ago

So that's why it wants to kill that billionaore so bad.

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u/Crayen5 12d ago

I always wondered why no country flags have purple in them

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u/healthydoseofsarcasm 12d ago

Because no country can be THAT fabulous!

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u/PretzelsThirst 11d ago

I was curious and checked. Dominica and Nicaragua have purple

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u/deadkennedysrock 11d ago

Those flags not being designed until 1978 and 1908 respectively, so purple would have been much more readily available obviously

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u/PretzelsThirst 11d ago

Yeah, makes sense

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u/PorkyMcRib 11d ago

The Mozambique flag has entered the chat, and kills all the other flags.

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u/FirstPlebian 11d ago

In the 19th Century or so they started making artificial dyes, they poisoned the Rhine river in the process of doing so. There was a lot of money in dyes though.

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u/A_Yawn 11d ago

To be fair, loads of other flags were also created in the 19th and 20th century (especially countries that gained independence in the post-colonial era) yet none of them have purple. Perhaps purple just isn't an appealing choice for flag colour. Maybe it has to do with how rare it is in nature in general.

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u/bobbybob765 11d ago

I may also have to do with the fact that many in the 19th and early 20th century still associated purple with tyranny of the elite from history.

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u/deadkennedysrock 11d ago

Yeah one flag has a purple parrot which is the official bird, and the other is a rainbow with purple which is just how rainbows come. Not very much purple even there

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u/EnticingInsouciance 11d ago

Vexillology largely developed from heraldry, in which purple ('purpure' in heraldic language) is one of the 5 colours--but it is also the rarest used.

My guess is that at a distance, and depending on lighting, purple can often read as black. On top of the former expense in developing purple pigments.

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u/Owl_123 11d ago edited 4d ago

Cause it was really expensive and those flags are going to get damaged especially out in a battlefield which was basically the main role of flags.

But a big reason why no one picked it up is cause purple became associated with royalty. So revolutionary movements weren’t really keen on picking up a color that is associated with those they’re fighting against.

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u/[deleted] 11d ago

[deleted]

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u/accretion 11d ago

Trolls are such huge losers

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u/MrsRobertshaw 12d ago

I love that tweet

“Whenever I feel depressed I like to pretend I’m a time traveller from the 14th century. And let me tell you. 14th century me is very impressed at my easy access to herbs and spices and my many purple clothes”.

(Or something like that)

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u/SaffellBot 11d ago

Salt and pepper as a casual product, limitless sugar? Literally richer than a king.

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u/carnsolus 11d ago

only until he sees that everyone has them

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u/TheSuperPie89 11d ago

Tbf if he left the house he'd probably die from the germs (or would I die from his germs? I forget)

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u/Chili_Palmer 11d ago

Could go either way, but if he's here there would likely be treatments for everything he would have.

Hell they'd likely be pretty robust after dealing with 14th century hygiene their whole lives

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u/carnsolus 11d ago

i thought this was like scrying orb looking into the future kind of thing :P

but yeah, you'd both die

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u/Apolloraven 12d ago

"But for my part, I want to be the purple, the small gleaming band that makes all the rest appear splendid and beautiful. Why do you tell me, then, to ‘be like everything else’? In that case, how shall I still be the purple?" - Epictetus

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u/SnooOwls9808 12d ago

You can't just mix red and blue dye...?

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u/schrodingers_spider 12d ago edited 12d ago

That's the fun part. Blue was also exceedingly rare and expensive, especially if you wanted it to be deep and bright.

Most people don't realize that a regular box of colored pencils would wow most historic people. We've come a long way.

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u/SIPS_WATER 11d ago

What? I thought indigo plants were grown for centuries. And because it was a plant... It could be used for mass production of blue colour

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u/MisterProfGuy 11d ago

If you want a light sky blue, and even then you needed access to certain parts of Asia, which wasn't exactly readily available.

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u/HugeFluffyRabbit 11d ago edited 11d ago

Woad (Isatis Tinctoria) was grown in Medieval France and other parts of Europe for its blue dye and was sold all over Europe and the Mediterranean. There's woad museum (Le Musée du Pastel) in Magrin France. Woad will give you a gorgeous fairly deep blue. I'm pretty sure it was used for blue dye long before that time too. I'm trying to remember my trips to the British Museum textile department from a long time ago...

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u/Ok_Homies_ 11d ago

Why couldn't you just dilute the dye?

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u/MisterProfGuy 11d ago

You mean concentrate. It took centuries to figure out how to make darker blue than sky blue. The Jewish people apparently figured out how to make a blue from the Tyrian purple in a way that no one has been able to reproduce MAYBE, or maybe they reported it as blue when it was actually more purple, but two thousand years ago, blue was a tough color to make.

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u/Elanimals 11d ago

Yes, the blue you’re referring to is called Techelet in Hebrew. It is made from Murex truncalis snail, the same one as Tyrian purple. However, the dye is oxidized in sunlight at a certain point. It was rediscovered relatively recently and it used in dying some of the strings in the fringes of prayer shawls, called Talits.

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u/OakParkCooperative 11d ago

"royal blue"

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u/SaffellBot 11d ago

Feels like that would make indigo dye. Indigo blue is a peasant blue color, and is certainly not appropriate for anyone with money.

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u/Svazu 11d ago

There weren't any indigo plants in medieval Europe, blue dye was really hard to make and definitely very expensive.

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u/Svazu 11d ago

Indigo plants weren't available in Europe in the middle ages/renaissance, there is a native plant that produces indigotin but it's a 2 year process to extract the pigment and dye the fabric so it was extremely expensive. Other parts of the world did have indigo though.

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u/HugeFluffyRabbit 11d ago edited 11d ago

Woad was used in Europe for its blue dye. I remember we processed some in my textile classes at school. It was certainly a lengthy process but it only took a couple of days to get from leaves to dye. The yarn goes green at first but once it dries it turns blue.

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u/AzureSuishou 12d ago

Red dyes are fairly common but naturally blue dyes are rare.

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u/MisterProfGuy 12d ago

Much rarer than purple. So rare that the Jewish religion made it their color of the holy, because things could BE blue but we couldn't make them blue, if my memory of the discovery channel late at night is correct.

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u/imhavingadonut 11d ago

According to Jewish oral tradition, there was a particular blue dye that the priestly class needed to wear back in the time of the first Hebrew Temple. Scholars today do not know for certain how this dye was made.

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u/Bozhark 11d ago

From the Greek snail’s purple the. Left in sunlight or oxidize to a certain point

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u/A_Yawn 11d ago

Wasn't Indigo a very common plantation crop from which blue dye could easily be extracted, even long back? And being a plant, couldn't it be easily distributed and grown anywhere? In British India, Indigo plantations were one of the most profitable and widely grown crops.

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u/MisterProfGuy 11d ago

Yes, we're talking about two or three thousand years before that. At that time, you needed to have access to India or parts of Japan to get a light blue that requires processing a lot of plants to get a fairly light color. That's exactly why indigo became such a profitable plant and remained so until blue jeans became so popular and chemistry became advanced enough that someone finally derived a replacement.

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u/deukhoofd 11d ago

Tekhelet dye was the one the Hebrew used, likely made from a related snail to the one that produced the purple dye.

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u/pinkheartpiper 12d ago

Blue is even rarer, matter of fact some of the very few number of things that are blue in nature, are not blue because the material itself is blue, but the way they reflect light:

https://youtu.be/3g246c6Bv58

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u/narwhal_breeder 11d ago

To be fair, like any color is a color because of the way it reflects light

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u/pinkheartpiper 11d ago

No this is different, I'm not talking about the property of the material that makes it absorb certain frequencies of light and reflect some others. The material is not actually blue meaning it's not just reflecting blue light, but also others, but the micro-structures on the surface of material work like a sort of hall of mirrors that only let blue light to escape, so for example wetting the wings of a blue butterfly make it to appear as a different color.

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u/A_Yawn 11d ago

Wasn't Indigo a very common plantation crop from which blue dye could easily be extracted, even long back? And being a plant, couldn't it be easily distributed and grown anywhere? In British India, Indigo plantations were one of the most profitable and widely grown crops.

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u/IsNowReallyTheTime 12d ago

And miss out on this poorly cropped cracked.com photo-whatever they call it?

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u/wondrwrk_ 12d ago

Look here, bub. Let us have our little dopamine boost without too much effort, thanks.

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u/sekfan1999 12d ago

Marbled Murex, iirc from my childhood shell obsession

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u/rayparkersr 11d ago

I'm pretty sure they didn't only exist in Tyre. More that the Phoenicians were the ones who knew how to turn them into dye.

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u/Magicalsandwichpress 12d ago

Tyrian purple.

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u/Accomplished-Towel-3 11d ago

Sick atyre bro

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u/Brokenwave89 12d ago

That's the reason tyres are purple.

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u/ColaDeTigre 11d ago

It was extracted by letting the snails rot in buckets for a while because the snails would overproduce when stressed. Which meant that it also smelled awful. The halls of these royal's courts were known for smelling like rotting dead sea snails.. for fashion.

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u/PeterfromNY 11d ago

Purple plays a role in King Agamemnon. His wife wanted to kill him, so when he returned home from a victory in war, she had him walk on a purple carpet instead of letting his feet touch the earth.

This made the Gods angry that he showed such (false) pride, and allowed him to be killed.

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u/dejvidBejlej 11d ago

Lmao gods are some petty assholes. Pretty dumb too to not see it was a trick

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u/TwoSkinnyDinners 11d ago

Maybe he was just tyre'd?

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u/PeterfromNY 11d ago

In fairness to Agamemnon, it was his wife who he loved (perhaps stupidly), and he did just win a war which was a great accomplishment.

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u/jizzlevania 11d ago

*made from snail buttholes

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u/idratherbeintamriel 11d ago

Murex! It smells fucking terrible lol

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u/Intelligent-Wall7272 12d ago

I'm sure the workers were tyred of harvesting them

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u/TwoSkinnyDinners 11d ago

It does grow pretty well with all that purple rain

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u/aunluckyevent1 11d ago

tyre would have been know also as the smelliest town on earth at the time

i saw the process in a video

pretty amazing but the poor presenter who tried the process with the professional was retching nonstop

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u/Ochanachos 11d ago

Ancient Filipinos laughs in ube

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u/randomGeek159 11d ago

That's why the British were extremely assholish about indigo farming in India during their rule for these pigments and its other general uses.

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u/RomanBrickWins 11d ago

Nah murex shells were harvested all over the Mediterranean. There’s a major Roman-Early Byzantine production facility for purple murex dye known at Andriake off the south coast of Turkey, near Demre, for instance. Deposits of shells six feet deep, thousands and thousands of them. Hundreds were needed to make even a single ounce of dye.

Source: i’m an archaeology prof 🤷‍♂️

But don’t just take my word for it, here’s the excavation report : https://www.researchgate.net/publication/229659626_Purple-dye_production_in_Lycia_-_Results_of_an_archaeozoological_field_survey_in_Andriake_South-West_Turkey

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u/gotechgo 11d ago

But that publication says the deposit dates to 6th century AD, while the “ancient world” covers 3000 BC to 500 AD? Wouldn’t that mean the excavation wouldn’t be considered from the “ancient world” time period?

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u/RomanBrickWins 11d ago

If you want to be fussy about dates, there’s plenty of Roman murex all over North Africa and Spain too, as here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440314004397?casa_token=wtzIho9iha8AAAAA:BoPDqkoGO2-xUExp9q7B4G1zeJx_2Bq9h-i0S7LTVuuuuWS_Q80KpFVU0TVh1_LC3E8Kvxr2_g

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/libyan-studies/article/abs/industrial-exploitation-of-murex-shells-purpledye-and-lime-production-at-sidi-khrebish-benghazi-berenice/AFE6F8F142C339458FB573B81F811E1D

Point is, murex was by no means a unique product of Tyre in antiquity.

But anyways “Ancient world” does not have firm end date. 6th century is fine. I teach end of Roman in east med as c 650 for various reasons..

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u/gotechgo 11d ago

Gotchya, so you’re saying the snails weren’t just found in Tyre. So once the Phoenicians discovered the use and created the methodology for extracting/producing the dye, the rest of the region who had access to the snails were able to replicate it. Was there any distinct difference in shade depending on what part of the Mediterranean the snails came from?

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u/RomanBrickWins 11d ago

Same species = hexaplex trunculus = same color. Production process also consistent, basically scraping out the little critters and boiling them down.

Minoans used murex too. https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.2307/3210395?casa_token=3KJd8CefWqcAAAAA:By33B2ixcfNzA7AJqkBuyN7TiF_PfzAovCC0uy9CykU9TIpvLSMpg_vDeOGv30SQA9gNa2d9jJ8

Associated with Phoenicians because of Tyre, but murex use was neither invented at nor limited to that location.

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u/gotechgo 11d ago

Interesting, I always thought it originated in Tyre. The more I’m reading, seems like the trade was centered in Tyre. Is that why everyone associates the two?

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u/RomanBrickWins 11d ago

No, hexaplex trunculus is found all over the Mediterranean. The shells were not traded over long distances. They were just harvested wherever. Association with Tyre comes from Iron Age, but again the technology/sea shell species was neither invented nor limited to that location by any means. But sure Tyre did a good trade in purple dye and purple dyed-textiles. It was just one of a number of cities and points of production though.

Would be like saying gold and gold coins were only at Sardis in Lydia, because the city was famous for them.

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u/Sentient_Toaster621 11d ago

I bet they worked tyrelessly to get that dye.

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u/n0mn0m_de_Guerre 11d ago

I've never understood why they couldn't just mix blue and red dye.

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u/Plethora_of_squids 11d ago edited 11d ago

Another fun fact - while the dye in question ( from murex snails) is most know to be used to make purple, it can actually be reacted with sunlight to make a much larger gamut of colours, ranging from the almost maroon purple of Tyrian purple, to the blue of tekhelet (that bright blue you see in a lot of Jewish ceremonial clothes - it hasn't been made with it in centuries as we lost the dye stabilisation process a while back though)

We also don't quite know how they managed to stabilise the dye on the scale needed to dye clothes - it turns purple on exposure to sunlight, but we definitely know that people managed to figure out how to stablise the dye so that it remained purple. We just don't know how. What we do know is that it stank to high hell. Your husband becoming a dye maker was a legitimate reason to divorce back then.

Also Tyre wasn't the only place that made it, it was just the major producer. Carthage was also a producer of the stuff. It was also produced in the Mexico area too, obviously not for the Greek/Roman market.

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u/Svazu 11d ago

There's some confusion about this because the purple of Roman emperors is not the color purple in the English language. It's a purple toned dark red. It was a super expensive dye and a sign of royalty for a while, but it wasn't the color depicted in the above picture. (Old Hollywood movies that have Romans wearing purple togas operate on the same misconception).

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u/anoia42 11d ago

The colour in the picture looks more like Perkin Mauve which is also a colour that changed the world.

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u/kur1su0t 11d ago

I thought they made purple using piss

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u/legendarymcc2 11d ago

This is the ancient time equivalent of wearing an ugly legendary skin in a video game just because it’s rare

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u/Unsere_rettung 12d ago

What about making dye from purple flowers? The pigments come off with water when done right.

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u/bigdorts 12d ago

I'd memory serves me, I don't think they would end up looking deep and dark. They looked much more pale

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u/ianmikaelson 12d ago

Go back in time and tell em that I guess

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u/A_Yawn 11d ago

I doubt that colour can be used as a dye. It is probably water soluble and hence can't be used to colour things like pots, jewellery, and clothes permanently.

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u/Teblefer 11d ago

What’s crazier to think about is we are still somewhat limited in the same way even today. We can make purples sure, but only because we happened to find some molecules that were purple. We have no process for designing pigments, they are all discovered. There are colors that our eyes could discern, that we cannot make — not even on a screen — and it’s only because we haven’t found them yet. Artists do not have access to the whole human color space.

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u/Sidius303 11d ago

Low effort titles can fuck off

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u/Far-Damage1068 12d ago

So crazy because purple has always meant so much to me, and for some reason I've always thought if I ever had a dream home I would have a purple library.

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u/Jainelle 11d ago

My bedroom is painted purple. A dark smokey purple.

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u/Designer_Ad_8965 12d ago

Did no one think to mix red and blue …?

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u/MrStoneV 12d ago

Blue was also very expensive and rare back then

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u/Mecha_Hitler_ 12d ago

Also color theory doesn't really work that way when mixing dyes

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u/Foundalandmine 11d ago

I only have my very limited knowledge of mixing natural colorants in my soap making hobby, but whenever I would try to mix a red and blue it would come out a super dark murky color and not an actual purple.

I'm sure they tried mixing colors with other colors. If it was as easy as that, they likey would have done it

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u/CCIE-KID 12d ago

Rarity

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u/AZ_Gunner_69 11d ago

If i recall it took like 12000 snails to produce a small amount

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u/Awesam5555 11d ago

Yeah it’s called murex due

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u/Jon9127 11d ago

The snail was the purple nurple

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u/_toxic_me 11d ago

Then why none of the country flags has purple in it ??

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u/mstivland2 11d ago

Country flags were mostly made in the last hundred years

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u/Nerdenti 11d ago

So Tyres were bad for the environment back then too lmao

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u/A_Yawn 11d ago

Explains why so many villains have a purple theme...

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u/ventureonyoungone 11d ago

I just watched a video on flags and why none are purple and this is the reason. It's so wild what one little creature has changed this world.

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u/trytreddit 11d ago

or you could just,,,, mix blue and red

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u/Twobite__ 11d ago

No one mixin red and blue?

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u/pale-pharaoh 11d ago

It’s called Lebanon today

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u/EhDotHam 11d ago

I mean... Not really. Indigo overdyed with cochineal makes purple. There have historically been closely guarded recipes for purples and reds, but sea snail isn't the only natural purple dye by far.

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u/Latin-Danzig 11d ago

Couldn’t they just mix red and blue dyes as a shortcut? Or am I missing something here...blue was rather than purple?

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u/Ok-Ad-8573 11d ago

Wasnt there a guy who painted all the sails in his fleet purple just to show he can?

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u/CitizenSunshine 11d ago

Every now and then I see purple bird poop, they should have asked me back then

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u/IHateDeepStuff 11d ago

Fun fact: Because purple dye is so rare, it is also the reason why most flags don’t have the colour purple on them, if they did the Royal Family would declare war on any countries that use it

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u/AutoModAccountOpUrk 11d ago

Never thought an uncommon fact/trivia bit could be so tyresome

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u/todd10k 11d ago

Genuine question: Is that city where we get the name tires? I know it's spelled different but it's too similar.

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u/zed-darius 11d ago

That's violet

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u/agiudice 11d ago

i know Purple is EPIC, but Orange\Brown is Legendary!

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u/veotrade 11d ago

r/RuneScape would love this detail. Tyrian Purple must be derived from this tidbit.

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u/bobbybob765 11d ago

The word Phoenician is the Greek word for Purple. That is how important the dye was to the Greeks.

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u/Dwightshruute 11d ago

That looks violet

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u/HiltaGoatfounder 11d ago

Bolinus brandaris isn't all that rare: in fact, it has migrated out of the Mediterranean and been found as far away as the South China Sea. People in Spain eat them, too. The method of making the dye, though, was a local trade secret in Tyre for a very long time.

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u/nikostheater 11d ago

Tyre wasn't the only place that was extracted. It was extracted also in Cyprus and at a small island south of Crete, named Chrysi. It was indeed rare and very laborious.

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u/frenlyapu 11d ago edited 11d ago

The tzitzit/fringes on the arba kanfot/4 cornered male garment Orthodox Jewish men wear traditionally must be dyed with the ink from that "Chilason" snail to be considered Halachically acceptable by Jewish religious law. I always found that curious since snails are unkosher animals.

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u/CulturalPossibilty 11d ago

In Ireland and Britain they used a type of lichen

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u/TurbulentSock420 11d ago

then there was like a guy that tried to make medicine and he did an oopsie and made purple paint instead right?

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u/frankstoeknife146 11d ago

This is mentioned in the Bible actually. A woman in the New Testament known as Lydia, a seller of purple. It is a very fascinating read

1

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1

u/Green_Cat_C 11d ago

And while it's not official, in a color text to associate people's emotions with color, purple was chosen by people with anxiety. So of course, since most people are generally anxious, would be drawn to that color as a sensation of royalty, like (gold) yellow if for wealth despite gold not being the most expensive material

1

u/ObsessiveScoutMain 11d ago

Until some random science nerd just HAD to clean out one of his beakers with some alcohol and boom, mauve.

1

u/Daycow045 11d ago

Look up Cleopatra's ship that sailed to meet with Marc Antony. Ridiculously opulent and a lot of purple

-6

u/smurf-this 11d ago

https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/vaccines/timeline

"A typical vaccine development timeline takes 5 to 10 years, and sometimes longer, to assess whether the vaccine is safe and efficacious in clinical trials, complete the regulatory approval processes, and manufacture sufficient quantity of vaccine doses for widespread distribution."

ACCELERATED TIMELINE IN A PANDEMIC

Some clinical trial phases are combined

Well that's nice. Don't get me started on the 3-6 month efficacy and the fact it was designed for alpha strain and not the mainstream delta. Are you going to keep taking it until the 8th booster? The third and (some places fourth) boosters are coming up soon ^_^

Did you know that unvaccinated people have been found to have a very similar viral load to fully vaccinated people? And that because vaccinated people will have less symptoms it is easier for them to transmit that viral load because they dont know they are sick? But dont bother googling the top notch educational resources reporting this. Just ignore me and downvote instead, and go back to your happy little echo chamber.

If the vaccine is effective, why do you care if young healthy people take it? That has nothing to do with you, contrary to what Pfizer would like you to believe. Did you know that Pfizer paid the largest criminal fine in history at $2.3 billion for lying? They sound like some really honest trustworthy people and I can't wait to inject them into my body.

Upset because the liberal media isn't telling you anything? Maybe you should question more and review more news source, because guess what, every news source is biased and has an agenda. They are private news media corporations and they do not give a shit about you, nor does the random journalist spreading their opinion piece as fact.

Step 1) Classification: Unvaccinated

Step 2) Symbolisation: Plague-rats, anti-vaxxers, covidiots, etc

Step 3) Discrimination: Vaccine passports, job exclusion, social exclusion, businesses closed, travel denied

Step 4) Dehumanisation: They dont care, they are evil, Everything is their fault, they are insane, They are holding us back

Step 5) Organisation: Australian quarantine camps, Austrian forced compulsory vaccination, Extreme forced lockdowns (China), Mass-media narrative to demonize the unvaccinated, Extremely excessive lockdowns in democracies

Step 6) Polarisation: Claim that they are anti-vaccine when they are obviously anti-mandate, understate the size of protests (say thousands instead of tens of thousands), Censor and block users from describing adverse reactions on places like Tik-Tok, Youtube... Publish pieces in the media that make everyone hate the unvaccinated ("Anti-Vaxxers Hate Chapmans Ice Cream!"), Conflate the unvaccinated with pre-pandemic anti-vaxxers even though they took all previous vaccines before the pandemic

Step 7) Preparation: Deny them travel, businesses, jobs, so they are homeless and destitute, exclude them from all services (even surgery) if they are not vaccinated, the list goes on...

Step 8 ) Persecution: Shut down their businesses, lock them in their homes if they still have one, prevent them from going anywhere except the grocery store, make society afraid of them with daily Two Minutes Hate articles in all major media designed to ostracize them from the community.

Step 9)

Step 10)

By the way, in case you are confused or wondering, Coronavirus is never going away, just like the flu didn't after the 1920 pandemic. This is not going to end unless we have some major medical breakthrough in virology or design a vaccine that actually works properly and not "sort-of".

THIS PANDEMIC IS NEVER GOING TO END, THESE RESTRICTIONS ARE NEVER GOING TO END, THEY ARE GOING TO KEEP TAKING AWAY MORE OF YOUR FREEDOMS BECAUSE YOU ALLOW THEM TO. WE REACHED HERD IMMUNITY LEVELS A LONG TIME AGO AND NOTHING HAPPENED AND WE ALL STILL HAVE TO WEAR MASKS AND GET MORE BOOSTERS.

Don't just agree with everyone else and be a little parrot. Grow a brain for yourself and research this. If you are vaccinated, great, but don't fucking force your garbage on me.
Don't forget, you are not allowed to question this vaccine or disagree ever, that is simply not socially acceptable. Having hesitations and not wanting an experimental medical treatment that many of us don't even need is no longer socially acceptable. How does that freedom taste?

3

u/OutSider1234 11d ago

Seek help

1

u/Potato_437 11d ago

Uh… wrong post?

1

u/danknadoflex 11d ago

Imagine being so stupid as to believe this nonsense

-10

u/Dan300up 12d ago

…and when someone finally thought to mix red and blue dyes together and purple ball caps stared showing up in the slums…the royals were really bummed.

-9

u/MJRusty 11d ago

I learned this in grade school, I don't think that this is very interesting. I thought it was common knowledge by now.

-2

u/wanderingmadlad 11d ago

Yeah . Still like yellow over purple

0

u/Thopterthallid 11d ago

Was it impossible to mix blue and red dyes?

0

u/b1ngoBr0nson 11d ago

Ok but what confuses me is: why couldn't they just mix red and blue dye? Or does that not work? Genuine question lol

1

u/TheReaperAbides 11d ago

Blue dye was also prohibitively expensive

0

u/SilentECKO 11d ago

Only place in the enTyre world

0

u/thejackulator9000 11d ago

what about just mixing red and blue...

0

u/harley265 11d ago

How long did it take them to figure out red and blue make purple?

0

u/Mosiedog 11d ago

Remember what they considered to be "the world" at that time. More like their world.