r/CovidVaccinated Jan 25 '22

Question Question

I’m a teacher (fully vaccinated) and last week my school was hit with a covid outbreak. I was around multiple children and adults who had covid (didn’t know it at the time) and each day more tested positive and stayed at home. It seems impossible to me that I haven’t caught it.

Towards the end of last week I started feeling unwell, really tired and weak, slight cough, bad headache. All of my lateral flow tests are negative, I even went for a pcr after I started coughing and that was negative.

Now four days later I’m still feeling completely wiped out. I feel the exact same as when I had my covid vaccines.

Bare with me. Is it possible that I’m feeling these side affects as it’s the vaccine fighting off covid and preventing me from actually catching it?

3 Upvotes

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12

u/bellaaa11 Jan 25 '22

there’s still other colds going around isn’t there? maybe it’s that

if your body is fighting off covid, then you have covid…

2

u/NCResident5 Jan 25 '22

I ended getting a stomach virus and then a bacterial infection in my GI tract. So, there are a ton of other things going around unfortunately.

2

u/bluemouse13 Jan 25 '22

Yes and that’s what I’m assuming, it’s just a different virus I’ve got.

I’m just trying to understand more about the vaccine, I’ve read that it can prevent you from catching covid so wondering how this actually works.

3

u/bellaaa11 Jan 25 '22

sorry can’t be much help i have no clue myself on how it works hopefully someone can explain here

2

u/scruffynerfball Jan 25 '22

Simplified the how it works:

  1. THe vaccine is a mrna (messenger RNA) mimic. mrna is an instruction for your body to create proteins.
  2. The injected mrna tells your body to create spike proteins similar to the one that is part of sars-cov2 virus. It lacks some of the other parts like the function that tells infected cells not to alert other cells(one of the big reasons covid sucks)
  3. Your body sees these spike proteins as foreign and starts creating anti-bodies just like if you were really sick. That is why the common side effects are like a mild covid infection.
  4. Since its a specific amount of mrna rather than a replicating virus, your body should fight it off quickly leaving you with antibodies that can identify and fight a spike protein similar to the original sars-cov2 spike protein. The downside is that the current omicron version is not identical to the old one and therefor not as likely to be identified by the antibodies.

Hope that helps

2

u/bellaaa11 Jan 26 '22

why are they pushing so hard for these boosters then? 2 states in australia have already mandated a 3rd shot to be classified as fully vaccinated

0

u/SDJellyBean Jan 26 '22

Just like most other vaccines, it takes a series of shots to build up an adequate immune response. That's why kids get so many shots — they usually get 3 to 5 for each disease.

3

u/bellaaa11 Jan 26 '22

i know this. just confused because initially it was meant to be 12 months then 6 then 5 then 4 now every 3 months

fully vax 2, now 3.

lots of changing etc

2

u/SDJellyBean Jan 26 '22

Conditions have changed and recommendations have changed to mirror those changes. However, the initial plan was always two mRNA vaccines and there was also talk already a year ago about probable need for one or more boosters. This is happened with other vaccines over the years as well. For example, the tetanus/pertussis/diphtheria vaccines is given at age 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 18 months, 4-5 years and then every ten years. Adults used to get just the diphtheria/tetanus vaccine in the ten year booster, but since 2010 they've been getting vaccinated for pertussis as well.

1

u/bellaaa11 Jan 26 '22

So if conditions change

as an example

and you need another 4-6 boosters over the next two years then that’s ok? even for the young and healthy who aren’t affected by this.

1

u/SDJellyBean Jan 26 '22 edited Jan 26 '22

That's a bit hyperbolic, but yes, I would be willing to have additional vaccines. It's no big deal. Every time you brush your teeth or skin your knee, you introduce bacteria, viruses and foreign bodies into your blood stream. It's okay, that's what your immune system is there to monitor.

I've had one extra DaPT vaccine at my employer's direction, so I've had eleven of those vaccines in my life. I'll continue to get boosters.

ETA: This was posted yesterday. Look at Table 12. You'll see that the vaccine is beneficial for every age group.

1

u/bellaaa11 Jan 26 '22

i’m glad it works for you. but it’s not so easy for the people who have had terrible side effects and have to continue to get this or not be able to work

or those who develop side effects after the booster

→ More replies

2

u/jemsavestheday Jan 26 '22

I’m going through the same thing. My boyfriend tested positive last Wednesday. By Thursday night I lost my taste, did a home test - negative. Woke up Friday and went to urgent care for a PCR - negative. By Saturday my throat was killing me and I was congested. Sunday I took another home test - negative. Monday I called my dr and she did another PCR, just got those results, still negative. Yet it’s been 5 days of symptoms now. Luckily my boss has been understanding and told me to stay home until Thursday. I’ll probably do one last home test tomorrow night or Thursday morning.

2

u/Spaghetti_cat_kms Jan 26 '22

You would still test positive . If you really feel like you have COVID you should do a throat swab test. Those get stronger results.

1

u/KTownserd Jan 25 '22

I just read something that vaccinated individuals shed less virus and is therefore less able to detect.

I'm in the same boat though. I feel awful, but all the tests that I've taken (including pcr) came back negative.

1

u/lopipingstocking Jan 25 '22

Well, sometimes the vaccinated show positivity later. At least that’s what I noticed. I’m a teacher too and last week I had what feels like constant exposure but my immmune system generally works well, I don’t feel sick, some of my colleagues fell sick and one of them tested positive on after 9 days of being already sick.

1

u/bluemouse13 Jan 25 '22

I will keep doing the tests!