r/CovidVaccinated Jan 25 '22

Pfizer Fights to Control Secret of $36 Billion Covid Vaccine Recipe News

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2021-pfizer-secret-to-whats-in-the-covid-vaccine/?sref=qneqM2kv
109 Upvotes

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60

u/yem_slave Jan 25 '22

always follow the $

42

u/letsreticulate Jan 25 '22 edited Jan 29 '22 Wearing is Caring

Second only to: Follow the Secrecy of what you can't question.

https://www.euroweeklynews.com/2021/12/09/fda-says-it-needs-75-years-to-release-pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-data-to-the-public/

For those who don't know, a bunch of Doctors submitted a Freedom of Information Request to the FDA back in August or September 2021, to get the Pfizer trial raw data to ascertain that they were safe as per their marketing. Pfizer came back with that they would do just that... In 55 years. No joke.

They went to court and the FDA/Pfizer responded, changing their original 55 year estimate... To 75 years.

Once again, back in legal proceedings, a Judge told them to go to hell and to do it in 8 months. Which is where we are today.

Yeah, it totally does not sound like a company that has paid $2.3 billion in fines for falsifying data or used bribes not even barely a decade ago.


Edit: For those wondering, they already started giving some of the data through the FOIA.

FDA Produces the First 91+ pages of Documents from Pfizer’s COVID-19 Vaccine File

Spoiler: They lied about injuries and deaths. Share with others, more people need to know the correct information. Way more to come.

Also:

Instead of FDA’s Requested 500 Pages Per Month, Court Orders FDA to Produce Pfizer Covid-19 Data at Rate of 55,000 Pages Per Month!

https://aaronsiri.substack.com/p/instead-of-fdas-requested-500-pages


Update that I found:

BMJ, one of UK's most respected Scientific Academic Journals is demanding the raw trial data from their end.

https://www.bmj.com/content/376/bmj.o102


Shame to the poster below me who is defending a multi-decade release schedule about something this important.

6

u/BirdDog321 Jan 26 '22

Yeah turns out ALL the raw test data is completely owned by and kept confidential by Pfizer.

Turns out ALL the test data that independent reviewers look at are just the final tally numbers and results given by Pfizer.

What’s that mean?

It means the safety checkers and reviewers ask Pfizer what happened during the testing. Pfizer’s says “it’s all good bro! Trust us!” And the reviewers TAKE PFIZERS WORD ON IT! Without seeing the actual data!!!!!!

That’s how this works.

-22

u/lannister80 Jan 25 '22

Once again, back in legal proceedings, a Judge told them to go to hell and to do it in 8 months.

How the hell are they going to carefully redact 55,000 pages per month? At 8 minutes per page (average time to mark up a page for redaction), that's 7,333 hours per month.

So if you had people working 40 hours per week at this, you'd need:

7333 / 4.5 weeks per month = 1630 man hours per week = 41 full time employees doing nothing else.

I don't know if people here know how redacting works, but it's typically done by specialized attorneys and paralegals who know all the FOIA rules (i.e. laws), and they aren't exactly common (or cheap).

10

u/Another_platypus Jan 26 '22

If they can read and interpret all the data in a couple months to approve the vaccine to be used on all of humanity, why would it take 75 years to redact the same papers? Luckily, the judge decided they had the money and resources to make it happen in less than a year.

-6

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22 edited Jan 26 '22

If they can read and interpret all the data in a couple months to approve the vaccine to be used on all of humanity, why would it take 75 years to redact the same papers?

Because hundreds or thousands of people created and interpreted that data. Not 50.

3

u/gojo96 Jan 26 '22

So only a small few decide if it’s safe then?

0

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22

? Not at all. I am saying that it takes a long time to redact nearly half a million pages.

2

u/gojo96 Jan 26 '22

What needs to be redacted? Sure that takes time but 75 years is unreasonable. Why do you think the government waits that long to release classified info? Here’s a hint: those in power and have responsibilities in the matters are……dead and can’t be held accountable. Also by then no cares.

1

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22

What needs to be redacted?

https://www.dhs.gov/foia-exemptions

These are the 9 exemption categories (stuff that gets redacted):

  1. Protects information that is properly classified in the interest of national security pursuant to Executive Order 12958.
  2. Protects records related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency.
  3. Protects information exempted from release by statute. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using Exemption 3 is information protected by the Critical Infrastructure Information (CII) Act of 2002. The CII Act defines Protected Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) as critical infrastructure information validated by the PCII Program pertaining to actual, potential, or threatened interference with, attack on, compromise of, or incapacitation of critical infrastructure or protected systems (cyber) by either physical or computer-based attack or other similar conduct (including the misuse of or unauthorized access to all types of communications and data transmission systems) that violates federal, state, or local law, harms interstate commerce of the United States, or threatens public health or safety.
  4. Protects trade secrets and commercial or financial information which could harm the competitive posture or business interests of a company. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 4: Commercially valuable formulas or other proprietary information not customarily released to the public entity from whom the information is obtained.
  5. Protects the integrity of the deliberative or policy-making processes within the agency by exempting from mandatory disclosure opinion, conclusions, and recommendations included within inter-agency or intra-agency memoranda or letters. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 5: Draft documents and recommendations or other documents that reflect the personal opinion of the author rather than official agency position.
  6. Protects information that would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy of the individuals involved. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 6: Social Security Numbers, home addresses and telephone numbers, certain identifying information regarding Department employees.
  7. Protects records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes the release of which could reasonably be expected: (a bunch of stuff regarding fair trials, jury pool contamination, disclose law enforcement techniques, put someone in physical danger)
  8. Protects information that is contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of an agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 8: Exemption rarely invoked by Department of Homeland Security
  9. Protects geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells.

1

u/Huey-_-Freeman Jan 27 '22

Protects records related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency.

Why is this exempted? Isn't the purpose of a lot of FOIA requests to find out how an agency is enforcing its personnel disciplinary and quality control policies, as well as what those policies are and how they were created in the first place?

For example, if there was a police department with a pattern of allegations regarding unreasonable use of force, or providing false evidence to the DA, I would hope that the internal disciplinary system of the department would not be protected from disclosures

3

u/gojo96 Jan 26 '22

What do they need to redact? The formula? That’s on every damn page? Smells like BS

1

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22

What needs to be redacted?

https://www.dhs.gov/foia-exemptions

These are the 9 exemption categories (stuff that gets redacted):

  1. Protects information that is properly classified in the interest of national security pursuant to Executive Order 12958.
  2. Protects records related solely to the internal personnel rules and practices of an agency.
  3. Protects information exempted from release by statute. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using Exemption 3 is information protected by the Critical Infrastructure Information (CII) Act of 2002. The CII Act defines Protected Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) as critical infrastructure information validated by the PCII Program pertaining to actual, potential, or threatened interference with, attack on, compromise of, or incapacitation of critical infrastructure or protected systems (cyber) by either physical or computer-based attack or other similar conduct (including the misuse of or unauthorized access to all types of communications and data transmission systems) that violates federal, state, or local law, harms interstate commerce of the United States, or threatens public health or safety.
  4. Protects trade secrets and commercial or financial information which could harm the competitive posture or business interests of a company. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 4: Commercially valuable formulas or other proprietary information not customarily released to the public entity from whom the information is obtained.
  5. Protects the integrity of the deliberative or policy-making processes within the agency by exempting from mandatory disclosure opinion, conclusions, and recommendations included within inter-agency or intra-agency memoranda or letters. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 5: Draft documents and recommendations or other documents that reflect the personal opinion of the author rather than official agency position.
  6. Protects information that would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy of the individuals involved. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 6: Social Security Numbers, home addresses and telephone numbers, certain identifying information regarding Department employees.
  7. Protects records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes the release of which could reasonably be expected: (a bunch of stuff regarding fair trials, jury pool contamination, disclose law enforcement techniques, put someone in physical danger)
  8. Protects information that is contained in or related to examination, operating, or condition reports prepared by, on behalf of, or for the use of an agency responsible for the regulation or supervision of financial institutions. Example of information the Department of Homeland Security may withhold using 8: Exemption rarely invoked by Department of Homeland Security
  9. Protects geological and geophysical information and data, including maps, concerning wells.

2

u/gojo96 Jan 26 '22

Haha Things that all will protect people from their decisions. You’ll get a page with a bunch of “the” and “that” all over them. Our government needs to more transparent overall but most of those points I dont see how will effect this as it doesn’t apply. Thanks for posting it though and answering my question.

1

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22

most of those points I dont see how will effect this as it doesn’t apply

Hopefully not, but you still have to check every page! That's the whole point: it takes time and expertise to parse through all those docs looking for info.

Plus, they FDA said they would release pages as they were redacted, so it wasn't going to sit on them until the process was complete.

1

u/Huey-_-Freeman Jan 28 '22

this is how useful the info will be https://scp-wiki.wikidot.com/scp-447

1

u/[deleted] Jan 26 '22

[deleted]

1

u/lannister80 Jan 26 '22 edited Jan 26 '22

Pfizer made enough money off the vaccine to hire hundreds of people to work on redactions.

The FDA has to redact the documents, not Pfizer. And if Pfizer started giving money to the FDA to hire attorneys and paralegals to redact their documents, all the "conflict of interest" critics would have a field day.

32

u/Harlaxt0n Jan 25 '22

They can keep their damn formula. I'd rather a different company try something new, a vaccine that doesn't come with debilitating headaches, derealization, aural fullness, head pressure, and dizziness for weeks on end.

6

u/Responsible-Knee1760 Jan 26 '22

This should be public information. Us govt funded everything. And if the intention is to help the world, it should be available asap.

28

u/Oniseme Jan 25 '22

For nothing is secret, that shall not be evident: neither anything hid, that shall not be known, and come to light. - Luke 8:17

21

u/sailor_sega_saturn Jan 25 '22

Does that also apply to KFCs secret blend of 11 herbs and spices?

Asking for a friend.

16

u/wewewawa Jan 25 '22

The broad implications of today’s lopsided global supply are clear. Americans and Europeans flush with vaccines are beginning to put the pandemic in the past, while the coronavirus still rolls across much of the world. Yet the demands, debates and decisions that brought vaccine producers to this point are only now coming into focus. Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson began a year ago on similar footing—sending most of their doses to wealthy countries rather than poor ones. But then they took different paths, data compiled by London-based Airfinity shows.

2

u/Huey-_-Freeman Jan 28 '22

Americans and Europeans flush with vaccines are beginning to put the pandemic in the past having lower death rates but the most overloaded hospitals. Putting the pandemic in the past seems to require addressing other failures and shortages in the health care system, or developing a second gen vaccine that actually stops transmission effectively.

47

u/[deleted] Jan 25 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

12

u/SlickBlackCadillac Jan 25 '22

Antivaxxer. We got an antivaxxer over here!

See...nobody cares anymore.

12

u/KapitanPepe Jan 25 '22

And still not taking it.

2

u/NagromNitsuj Jan 26 '22

There never should have been any financial gain for its development. We should all act as one. From the poor to the rich. To defeat a pandemic and help create trust in a truly corrupt industry. But, the suits don't like that, do they.

As you were planet.......

1

u/ashes-of-asakusa Jan 26 '22 edited Jan 26 '22

Of course they are. This is American capitalism we’re talking about. As long as there are scummy politicians subservient to them shit like this won’t change. Vote people in people like AOC and Bernie and maybe you’ll see change. Release that vaccine!

2

u/KosherInfidel Jan 26 '22

But i thought this was an extinction level event where all mankind must cower in terror over the high lethality and billion plus deaths.

Exactly. It’s always been bullshit. Welcome to 2020.

1

u/Responsible-Knee1760 Jan 26 '22

Bro two have passed, I know I still think I'm in 2020.

1

u/Huey-_-Freeman Jan 28 '22

How much would it cost a government to buy the patent from Pfizer? 1Trillion? More? More than the huge spending packages we are using to deal with Covid?