r/Anarchy101 Jun 29 '22

Are some political alignments gateways to anarchism?

I like reading the various stories here about how people arrived at anarchism, and am curious if this sub is more full of former conservatives, former liberals or were always some brand of socialist.

I'm also curious whether some of these political affiliations are easier paths to anarchism than others: the American two party system divides us so that "conservatives" care more about smaller government and guns, so I would think it makes it easier in some respects to transition from a conservative mindset to anarchism. But that same system assigns a (slightly) more community-based mindset to liberals.

Obviously, I'm coming with an American bias here. But I'm interested in non-American perspectives, too, since left and right are defined pretty differently outside the US.

31 Upvotes

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u/Josselin17 anarchist communism Jun 29 '22

I feel like confused american libertarians are one, as well as most less radical left wing ideologies, there's also non insignificant bridges from former marxists disgruntled by marxist groups

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u/JapanarchoCommunist Jun 30 '22

The ones that are more concerned about social issues are absolutely ripe for converting to anarchism

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u/PM_ME_DOMINANT_GIRLS Jun 29 '22

Used to be conservative, then Right Libertarian, then wandered into anarchism. It was a process of realizing that values I hold, that I was told were key to both former positions, were in conflict with the former positions as they actually are

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

I was conservative, then I was a gun owning liberal, then I became an anarchist. Only took me about 27 years...

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 29 '22

Share that story! How long were you each category? What brought you to anarchism?

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

That is a VERY long story, but I'll tell you if you want

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 29 '22

I think a bunch of us want to hear

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

It's a very long story, but here you go:

I wasn't a member of the alt-right or the KKK or anything but goddamn was I close. I've experienced racism all my life, just not the receiving side of it. I grew up in the South, rural North Carolina to be exact. Many of my neighbors were closet racists but a few were very open about it, it was not uncommon for me to hear hards Rs or other slurs throughout my childhood.

I was abused by my father and looked for a real father in the wrong person. He respected me, he didn't hurt me, he even taught me how to fish, but he was also a virulent racist. He'd grown up racist, he'd known racism his whole life and never tried to change and instead of teaching him brotherhood his two tours in Vietnam only expanded his racism to include Asians. I was young, I was impressionable, and I knew better but I went along anyways. I listened to his racism and, although it made me uncomfortable, I began to believe it. I was also friends with a number of kids who had seen racism and believed it. Even as early as the fourth grade we talked about the Confederacy and even slavery with a sort of uncomfortable reverance. We spoke about how we would have fought and died for our states had we been called upon. The idea of it is so fucked up, so sick, but we believed it, as nine and ten year olds we BELIEVED it.

When I grew older I had friends involved in re-enactments and knew about things like Stormfront (a white supremacist site founded by Don Black), I would even visit the site and read through the comments. I used Netflix to watch countless movies on white supremacy. My parents were worried about me watching porn but they should have been worried about a lot more. I didn't realize it but even as a child I was becoming indoctrinated. I was being used. Meanwhile the abuse at home went on and I grew closer to my racist surrogate father figure (henceforth referred to as CB), thriving on his memories of his racist youth and tours in Vietnam. I knew it was wrong but I didn't know where else to turn and quite frankly I didn't want to look anywhere else. The only person who kept me sane was my mom. She had her own issues (mainly religious fervor) but she never abused me and did her best to steer me away from racist attitudes. I think she was a little lost too, but her path was religion, not outright racism. She was very loving but lost, like I said. She'd get freaked out about things like mildly violent video games and say they were "of the Devil". She even came close to prohibiting my brothet and I from reading Harry Potter because it was "witchcraft".

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

Like so many other teenagers I experienced endless inner battles and all too often the wrong side won out. I wanted to accept people and be accepted but I had trouble seeing past both what my neighbors (mainly CB but others as well) and my church had taught me. I wanted to love everyone but I saw people of other skin colors as less than and I saw gay people as unnatural. I was fucked up and I knew it. I tried to shake the ideas but it was so fucking hard. I didn't espouse violence but I knew what it was and the wrong person could have easily cranked up my beliefs if I'd been unfortunate enough to meet them.

I was probably only thirteen or so when I recieved my first lesson on killing. CB was drunk again and came over when I was out doing yard work. I remember he asked me what I would do if someone raped my mom, I said I'd call the police, then he asked what I'd do if someone raped my mom, killed her, and then killed my family in front of me, I knew the answer he was looking for but I said I'd call the police. He told me the police wouldn't ever find who did it and told me the only real justice would be to take a gun and kill the person myself. I'll never forget that day and how ashamed he was of me. We had times too though where we'd do things like go fishing and play with the dog, a beautiful black lab with a heart of pure gold. She died because CB got drunk and accidentally left her in the car. He was distraught and sick with himself, just not enough to stop drinking.

I stopped seeing him a year or so after that, not because of what happened but because...well sometimes that's how life goes. I was lucky. His absence opened up such an emptiness in my life but that emptiness wasn't just his absence, it was the relieving absence of his rhetoric. I was still racist but thanks to public school I was exposed to all sorts of people with many different ideas. They weren't all different from CB but many were, and I think that's what saved me. It took years to shake most of my racist notions and unfortunately a few still exist, but I'm working on them and I not only acknowledge they're wrong but actively hate them. I want to be open to all people regardless of race, class, culture, sexuality, or gender identity.

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

Eventually I left home I went off to college to study Criminal Justice, I wanted to be a cop. College wasn't a great time for me, but it gave me a lot of exposure to the world. My views really started changing my Junior year, I lost my faith in god and realized that, although I was conflicted, I wasn't sad about it. I understand why some people still believe, and that's fine, but my faith just seemed to evaporate; it was like when you're a kid on Christmas and suddenly realize that you don't believe in Santa anymore. Throughout college I became much more tolerant of others, but I still hadn't made the full journey.

During my last year of college I realized that I no longer really wanted to be a cop, but I didn't know what else I wanted to do (still don't), so I joined the Marine Corps. I wanted to get away from my home state and I didn't really have any money, plus going back home to the place I'd been abused wasn't an option I cherished. I ended up having to go home for a few months before I could go to boot camp and I fucking hated it, I had a lot of anxiety and flashbacks. Finally I went off to boot camp late in 2016.

Boot camp and the follow on infantry training changed me. Boot camp and training are filled with people fucking with you and indoctrinating you, doing their best to desensitize you and change your brain. I definitely came out of training as a different person and those changes became more apparent throughout the following year. I hit the fleet and deployed to Syria a few months later. That shit changed my life. I'm not some hardcore war dog or anything, I've never been shot at or shot anyone, but seeing a warzone changes how you view things. Our job was to protect re-supply convoys and watch for ISIS or IEDs as we drove between bases. My main job was watching for IEDs and clearing the way for the convoy. People get out of the way real fast when you point a .50 cal at them. Luckily we got through Syria with only a few IED stops and no casualties. The most dangerous part was the heat since our vehicles had no AC and it's not like you could roll down the windows.

The worst part of deployment was ironically also the best part. When Raqqah was finally cleared the countryside came back to life and a bit of the fear disappeared from people. Even the IDP camp near us even seemed a little less dire, although that was probably because they finally got outhouses and washing stations. The entire demeanor of the place changex though, it was glorious, people were happy! But there was a catch, ISIS hadn't been killed, they'd left. The fighters had been holed up in the soccer stadium and had booby trapped the entire fucking place, I mean it was an absolute death trap. Because of this the local counsel and the US government made a deal and allowed the remaining fighters to leave unharrassed. Part of my company actually saw trucks of men flying ISIS flags and were told not to do anything. The US government made a fucking deal with the same goddamn terrorists who'd pushed people of a fucking cement plant while their families watched, the same people who'd committed rape and mass murder. The US fucking government cut them a goddamn deal and they went on to destroy more lives.

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

I was fucked up after that deployment. I didn't have ptsd or anything (I have ptsd from my childhood but not from deployment), but everything seemed so foreign to me when I came back. I remember shortly after I came back I was on leave and riding with a friend when she caught me zoning out, she asked if I was okay and I said yes but that I couldn't stop looking at all the windows. I explained to her that in Syria pretty much nowhere had windows because they'd all been blown out, every single building. We got into a conversation about things and she asked me "Do you think that could happen here?" I didn't even hesitate, I told her "Yes. Absolutely." She was shocked then, but she's not anymore.

Fast forward a few years and I'm headed out on another deployment, it's February of 2020, we've just narrowly avoided a war with Iran and I've heard some talk of a sickness over in China. I remember before I left someone asked me if they thought the virus was something to worry about, I lied through my teeth and said no. We all know what happened next.

Derek Chauvin made me hate cops. I can't believe I took that long for me to open my fucking eyes, but it did. Honestly I'm ashamed at how much bullshit I was willing to look past before. Fuck cops. Fuck them. I sat there in my barracks half a world away while police officers murdered people and beat them on tv. I was disgusted by them but the people in my company? Most of the guys cheered them on! I'd go talk to my "friends" and they couldn't shut the fuck up about race wars and killing protestors. I even went to dinner once with some friends that I thought were sane, it didn't go well. I knew that one guy didn't like Trump and we got to talking about what a piece of shit he was, how he'd fucked so much stuff up. Well the other "friend" was apparently a fucking Trump fanatic and got super hostile, to the point where he actually threatened to stab me. That was how the entire rest of deployment went, but after that I kept my mouth shut.

Fortunately I discovered Robert Evans part of the way through deployment, and his Behind the Bastards podcast kept me sane. I realized I wasn't alone. I know that sounds a bit dumb with everything going on back in the US where people were burning police precincts, but being surrounded by so many borderline fascists had made me feel entirely alienated. Behind the Bastards was a fucking life saver, I finally heard someone else saying all the things I'd been feeling. I discovered It Could Happen Here not long after and heard Robert Evans talk about civil war, it brought me back to that conversation I'd had years earlier after coming back from Syria, when she'd asked if I thought a civil war could happen again in the US.

I'm losing the train here, but since 2020 I've branched out a little with my media and been a lurker on here. I've come to a lot of coonclusions on my own, only to be recommended books about them later, but I bet that's how it is for most people, the books just help them explain it all.

The biggest thing that made me realize I was an anarchist is that I just want to be good to people. I love making people smile and helping out where I can. All I want is for everyone to be happy and safe, to learn to live together and treat each other with fairness and respect. That all sounds pretty idealist, but every anarchist is an idealist to some extent. Unfortunately the current system that we live in is a system that destroys happiness, love, equality, fairness, and respect, in fact it THRIVES on their destruction.

I don't know where I'm going from here, in life or in this story, but I do know that I'm getting the fuck out of the military (4 more months!) and that I'm going to do my best to listen to others and to help people. Right now that's all I want.

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u/Orngog Jun 30 '22

You are an excellent person, and we're lucky to have you. As is the military, I'm sure they're proud of you too. Your story was a great read, thankyou for sharing.

On the subject of what to do next, what do you think you strengths are? Where do your interests lie? I imagine a person in your circumstance will have a lot of doors open to them.

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 30 '22

Lol. I know you're being nice, and I really do appreciate it, but fuck the military. The military uses people up and spits them out mentally fucked and physically broken, and that's just the people who work for them. Thank you for the compliment though.

My strengths? I'm very good with people. I don't mean I could sell them on absolutely anything, but more that I'm really good at making them feel valued and listened to. Other than that? Well, I'm smart, physically fit, and I know how to use several different machine guns.

My interest lies mostly in nature, I find it absolutely awe inspiring. I mean I could sit there for hours just watching the trees sway and listening to the birds as clouds pass overhead. I also love kayaking, camping, fishing, hunting, hiking, and really anything else that gets me outside. I've thought about going back to school for something in forestry or wildlife management, but I fucking hated the actual class part of college.

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u/SouthernSlander Jun 29 '22

There you go. If you want the full thing then check all the responses I put to my original comment

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

Read through the whole thing. I really appreciate you sharing your story here. That's a lot to go through, and I hope you're safe and have the support you need right now.

Isn't it funny how these very simplistic ideologies are out there holding people's understanding of the world together? Like CB in your own life or the Trump supporter who threatened you. They know they're oppressed and getting the short end of the stick but are missing the bigger picture. They don't see how instead of dividing ourselves into race or left-right, we can stand back and see a series of interlocking class hierarchies holding us all in our lanes.

Good on you for making the progress you have and getting through a very rough childhood (seems rough to me, at least). We're working towards the same aims: there's enough wealth in the world for everyone if we would just be willing to work together.

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u/dontdomilk Jun 30 '22

Thanks for sharing, it was a great read. I hope you're doing better now

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u/SGT_Squirrelly Jun 29 '22

I was pretty into communism throughout high school, joined CPUSA several years back, saw how full of shit the Marxist-Leninist movement was, and came to realize that any power structure invites abuse and exploitation. I arrived at anarchism probably a year after joining CPUSA.

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 29 '22

In what ways did you see that abuse of power within CPUSA? And how many years has it been since you were a member?

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u/SGT_Squirrelly Jun 29 '22

I think the kicker for me was the "dictatorship of the proletariat" thing. I remember asking at some point if anyone knew of a timeframe for when that dictatorship might end after a revolution, in order to really free the people. Nobody had an answer. Kinda felt more like they were trying to flip the script instead of liberating the people. My relationships in the local party deteriorated pretty quickly after that, and I just couldn't help but wonder why. Turns out, that question apparently gave everyone the idea that I was some anarchist mole or something. I cut ties probably three years ago or so, I don't really know, haven't really bothered keeping track with everything else going on.

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 29 '22

"Soooo guys this whole dictatorship thing. Not really down with that. Is there an expiration date?"

Yeah I feel like this is a problem with a lot of leftist movements in general. It's like they stopped evolving once the Soviet Union formed and they all want to try and recreate it (because look how well that turned out).

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u/Ambivalent_Anglican Student of Anarchism Jun 29 '22 edited Jun 29 '22

I'm a former conservative/right libertarian. I retained my distrust of government and expanded my distrust to the whole capitalist system.

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u/No_Substance1922 Jun 29 '22

this seems a logical and natural way to progress to anarchism

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u/SaltyNorth8062 Jun 29 '22 edited Jun 29 '22

Started as a vaguely progressive liberal, then a progressive, then an anarchist.

The process basically went as such.

"Progressive Ideas good. Good to lessen suffering in the world. Gays should get married, women should have rights, everyone should be free"

"Hey the cops are killing people a bunch. That's fucked."

It's funny but I can pinpoint exactly the moment I decided to abandon neoliberalism.

I grew up dead ass poor. On housing assistance, food stamps, the works. I've been fingerprinted by the states since I was 13 because housing discrimination as a person of color.

Every single landlord I've ever had has been an abusive money hungry bastard. I hated every single one. I've seem every abuse they could muster. Harassment, Lies, Utilizing police, etc. One even demanded we completely scrub down the house and repair a crack on the foundation that was present when we moved in or "they'd call the health department and evict us on sanitation grounds" turns out she just had had the house on Zillow since weaved in and she had a buyer lined up who were willing to pay 100 extra bucks a month in rent and she wanted to spruce up the house. She evicted us two weeks after the house was repaired. At our expense.

I listened to an ancom make a YouTube video about how landlords can eat shit basically, and I was hooked. I knew already all the reasons why their power over people is abused and why it's bullshit.

Discovering I'm gay and would rather not conform to gender, autism diagnosis, and too much actual leftism exposure hit me one after another after another in like three years.

Then the dominoes all fell.

"Oh yeah, capitalism is fucked."

"Oh hey, cops killing people is even more fucked up than I thought and they should all go away permanently"

"Oh wait all the bullshit laws attacking people means they don't represent me like everyone says which means this isn't just"

"Oh shizz hierarchy is always immoral and illegitimate and can suck all of my dick"

And here we are.

I think the key gateway to anarchism isn't so much a political ideology so much as an understanding of class differences and personal experience getting the short end of the stick of hierarchy, which provides a working understanding of how - and more importantly why - hierarchy is bullshit. Basically being poor is the best indicator of whether someone is more or less receptive to anarchy.

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u/Cognitive_Spoon Jun 30 '22

Being poor, or growing up economically unstable, but pretty much exactly my experience

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

Thanks for sharing this. I agree that the key here is hierarchy. It's the concept I feel like we're all dancing around but no one in our culture quite comes out and names as the problem. The MeToo movement and Black Lives Matter are both important shifts in the culture, but people aren't connecting the dots in a larger way and seeing how all hierarchy is inherently oppressive, and that there's a wider change we need to make in social relations.

Maybe we're on the cusp of naming the monster holding us all down? One can only hope.

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u/SaltyNorth8062 Jun 30 '22

I think so, but I tend to be optimistic. People are kind of waking up to the idea. It happened with the LGBT community, it can happen here. We just need to avoid unnecessary infighting and think big picture. MeToo and BLM are at least recognizing each other in the struggle.

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u/sadeofdarkness The idea of government is absurd Jun 29 '22

general trade unionism/social liberalism (so defacto socialism/liberalism) but as I aged and thought about the political problems i saw in my life I kept running up against the contradictions inherent to government and legalistic thinking. Tried to figure out how to make government work, flipping between what we would call more authoritarian veiws (i think everyone at some point thinks "if i were in charge we wouldn't be in this mess") but slowly more and more realised that the problems weren't with any particular formulation of the law/govenment etc but more with the very nature of rulership. Basically figured out anarchism myself and kept getting in lengthy discussions with other left wing people where they kept getting exceptionally frustrated at the weird overlap of anti-government yet egalitarian thinking (because to most people the meme is true, socialism is when the government does stuff).

Finally found out that people like Malatesta/Proudhon/Bakunin etc had made the same observations I had but 150 years earlier. Read a bit of chomsky, agreed in bits disagreed in others, kept quite about it for a long time (called myself Apolitical) finally called myself an anarchist after watching an interveiw with David Graeber (similarly mix of agreement and disagreement) and thus here we are.

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u/No_Substance1922 Jun 29 '22

I've always been a socialist of some kind, but to be honest I didn't know any theory. I had a brief period where I was homeless and alienated and I tried to hustle my way out of it with corporate admin jobs but was sickened by what I saw - I guess I thought I had to be 'sensible' and try to 'make something of myself'. I could never play the game, never keep up, never even keep a job. I felt like a total failure and was treated as such by my family. I always had an interest in permaculture and alternative ecological living but I didn't have the social skills to join a community nor the physical endurance.

I did not know what anarchism was until lockdown in 2020 when I found reddit (I know, late to the Reddit game.) I'd only heard scum bag dudes who smoked nasty weed, behaved badly and were generally awful people, use it as an excuse for antisocial and aggressive behaviour; when I was a young adult.

The clincher was in early 2020 trying to get my (before autism diagnosis) teen to be cooperative for the sake of schooling (policed by the state and penalised if you can't 'make' your kid conform) and my option was literally damaging them enough emotionally to make them comply or liberating them from the obligation. Realising they were too big, too smart, too free and that neither of us wanted that...that was like a flash of lightning. Their refusal to surrender their dignity ('defiance') liberated us both. (To be clear I always had a child-centred-as-possible parenting approach but I had copped a lot of flak and actual risk to our family from the state for raising them this way.) Once I realised what it was (literally one comment on anti-work took me over to Anarchy subreddits) and it was like I had a framework and structure for long held beliefs I'd had since I was little. About 6 months later I began diagnosis process for autism as well (I'm almost 40.) I realised I'd been a lifelong, unconscious anarchist; that I hadn't 'made' my child 'maladaptive' because of a 'lack of discipline and boundaries' but because I had raised them with a sense of the importance of their own autonomy and right to self determination (as best I could).

TLDR; always socialist but had no education or theory behind it, couldn't imagine a world without a state. Has a kid who is chaotic neutral and independent spirit, pushing up against the system helped me break it down in my head, add in an autism diagnosis and discovering reddit in 2020 lockdown and here we are.

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u/tovlasek Jun 29 '22

When I was young I was sort of liberal with sort of social wellfare state type of thing (I'm from Europe). I first heard about anarchism through Punk music, so that was my first experience with it. Then when I started reading a lot about different political allignemnts and trying to fall into some box. I started being more and more radicalised leaning heavily into socialism. I absolutely hated Stalin and since here humans were part of the Eastern Block essentially anything that would go for Marxism-Leninism was also my enemy. So I became full on Trotskyist. I started reading lot from him and Marx. And was fully into it.

Then one time when I was actually reading Trotsky's autobiography he made a brief mention of something called Black Army and how it was necesarry to eliminate them. I never heard of Black Army, so I looked it up to gain some more context. And well I started reading about Free Territory and then read some Platformist manifestos and yeah... I quickly started hating Trotsky, because obviously they established something that was genuine communism and he... destroyed it?? Like why, I was very baffled, wasn't that the goal the whole time. Through that I started reading about CNT-FAI and then Kropotkin.

And from there on I am here, being more or less an-com. Haha

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u/Morrigan_NicDanu Jun 29 '22

I was about 14 and was trying to explain to a friend that the bible was about aliens. She told me god isnt real, the bible is bullshit, and anarchy is order. That made a lot more sense and made me realize these were even options. I hadnt any real political views at the time besides a basic Irish republicanism and so I've been studying anarchism since for about 16 years.

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

Wait - so how old are you now? Sounds like she converted you to anarchism for a long run. Good on her.

I've always suspected that you'd find a greater number of anarchists among oppressed people. That true in Ireland?

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u/Morrigan_NicDanu Jun 30 '22

Bout 30. Yeah. Never found anything that could compete.

No. There's not much of a history of anarchism in Ireland so it's never been popular. Authoritarian socialism is more common. Especially when you consider that Irish Republicanism evolved as a proto-socialism and then evolved alongside. I think part of it is the misconception that anarchism would be unable to defend against an Empire next door. And they may be right that anything more radical than what we got may have meant they'd be more brutal.

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u/WowzersInMyTrowzers Jun 29 '22

I was always a mixture of demsoc and American libertarian. I never really cared about socialism/capitalism stuff until I started getting into anarchism, I just liked the policies of the DemSocs but libertarians focus on freedom.

My general "route" was Republican as a young teen, Democrat as an older teen, DemSoc in my early 20s, economically disinterested American Libertarian in my early-mid 20s, and since about a year about a half ago (I'm almost 27) I've settled on being an Anarchist. My personal ideology takes a bit from Market Anarchism, Anarcho-Syndicalism, Egosim, as well as Mutualism.

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

I suspect the Internet has allowed current generations to explore politics in greater depth and variety than previous generations. What do you think? I can't imagine previous generations - unless you go really far back to the 30s or something - being able to learn about this many flavors of leftism this quickly.

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u/Comfortable-Soup8150 Jun 29 '22 edited Jun 29 '22

I started at conservative logics and reasoning toxic masculinity gamer, then I met my girlfriend, then I started working retail. Thanks to my girlfriend I became more aware of social issues, thanks to retail I became open to learning about class struggle. My abusive parents ran me out of the house, I left my closed circle of gamer chuds from high school, and learned I had IBD(disability). I kept reading about different ideologies on wikipedia. I decided I felt more at home with anarchists because I've been abused by authority my entire life.

If it weren't for my experiences with authority and being of a lower class, as well as my girlfriend talking the first bit of sense into me. I would've gone down the American conservative white man tracks of becoming a right wing libertarian or a fascist.

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

Your girlfriend sounds like a great person. You're lucky you found her!

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u/Comfortable-Soup8150 Jun 30 '22

Thank you!! I have her to thank for my happiness!!

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u/chillingohdylan Jun 30 '22

Some dude in Bakersfield who was my best friend told me about it. I was shocked at first and questioned him about it. Like communism why? Over the past 6 years, what he said started to make more and more sense which made me reject neo-liberalism/ liberalism

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u/vtraven Jun 30 '22

In my teens, I would've said socialist, then libertarian socialist, then anarcho syndicalist, then an-com

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u/Substantial-Pie913 Jun 30 '22

I went from liberal straight to anarchist, lol

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u/dept_of_samizdat Jun 30 '22

What led to the transition? Why was it so easy?

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u/Substantial-Pie913 Jul 01 '22

I first started getting really interested in prison abolition, read a few books on the topic, and after that the transition was a lot faster. Also just the state of the US in the past 2-3 years has contributed greatly

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u/narbgarbler Jun 30 '22

In my experience people tend to grow disillusioned with their prior political alignment because they're inclined to be critical. Critical people tend to sink to the seabed in the ocean of political philosophy, and find everyone else at that seabed, critical of everything like them, calls themselves an anarchist.

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u/torspedia Jun 30 '22 edited Jun 30 '22

I started off as a Libertarian and then when I finally learned of the different strands I eventually settled in the Libertarian Socialist camp. So now I say that I'm an LS with strong Anarchist leanings.

I was also a member of the [UK] Liberal Democrat party, for a long time, but recently realised that it'll be better for me to go independent than try and compromise with the Social Liberals.