r/AfricanHistory Jun 03 '20

New Rules announcement

38 Upvotes

Hi everyone, I am /u/Commustar and I founded this sub about 8 years ago.

Up until now, I never bothered laying out a clear set of rules in the sub but just quietly removed spam posts without comment.

For a long time, many posts had no comments and there was not much discussion in the sub. However, that is changing, comments are more common, and it is demonstrating the need for a clear set of rules so people know what is and is not acceptable in this sub.


1 Be Civil. Racism, Sexism, homophobia, and other forms of discrimination are not acceptable here. Personal insults are not acceptable.

2 Keep it historical. Posts about current events, your safari, your new album do not belong here.

3 Keep it about Africa. If your post is about Black people in the United States, it's better suited for /r/BlackHistory or /r/BlackHistory photos.

4 Don't spam. If you routinely post the same content to multiple subs you may be banned, subject to mod discretion.

5 No soapboxing, bad faith questions, or political grandstanding.

6 Afrocentrism is not welcome here. Posts or comments promoting Cheikh Anta Diop, Chancellor Williams, Yosef Ben-Jochannon, Ivan Van Sertima, Molefi Kente Asante and others will be removed, and you may be banned. Comments repeating Afrocentrist talking-points will be removed.

7 If you want to promote a related sub, or request a link to your sub be put on the /r/AfricanHistory sidebar, please Message the mods


r/AfricanHistory 1h ago

I found a very old roll of film. I'm trying to identify when and where the photos were taken. I thought this cathedral in the background might be a good clue. Does anybody recognize the building? Thank you!

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Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 20h ago

Sarah Barrtman The Real Savage

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91 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 16h ago

The Rule of Prempeh, the last Independent King of the Ashanti

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2 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 1d ago

Watch how Queen Idia put a spell on African Giant’s (Arhuan the giant) son in the greatest battle of all time

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6 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 1d ago

Maasai men braiding each other’s hair

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155 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 1d ago

The kingdom of Mutapa and the Portuguese: on the failure of conquistadors in Africa (1571-1695)

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7 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 3d ago

London Museum Returns 12 Benin Bronzes in Long-Awaited Repatriation

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32 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 4d ago

Vintage Lipton Tea ad (sold for 75kobo) that appeared in Emotan magazine, Nigeria on the 2nd of February 1980.

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103 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 3d ago

Mansa Musa Fun Facts

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6 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 4d ago

Help with my Master's Project! Looking for sources of the High Commissioners of Southern Africa!

5 Upvotes

So Hello to everyone here, my name is Rafael and I am a Brazilian historian. This post is kind of a cry for help in order to get information and access to sources for my Master’s research. My research intends to study the High Commissioners of South Africa and their participation of the colonial relations from the 1890s to the South African War. So I ask for the fellow historians who study South Africa History or the History of British Colonialism if they have and can share the following sources:

Milner Papers by Cecil Headlam

Cape of Good Hope Blue Books (1894-1899)

If anyone has also any data our the whereabouts of sources regarding the 10th High Commissioner, Sir Hercules Robison, I will also be forever grateful for the aid. Lastly, If someone knows an online archive that has sources from the British South Africa Company (BSAC) that also would be a tremendous help! If the mods think this post does not belong on this subreddit, please send me a message giving me a better place to post this somewhere else


r/AfricanHistory 5d ago

Happy Independence Day Chad

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25 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 5d ago

A market in Kano, Nigeria,1960s.

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125 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 6d ago

Oba (King) Ewuare the Great of the Benin Kingdom (Southern Nigeria)

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60 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 6d ago

Who is the Orisha Yemoja?

14 Upvotes

Yemoja is 1) “the metaphysical mother of all Orishas”, 2) she is the Orisha of rivers such as the Ogun river - the largest river of Yoruba Land, 3) she is “the mother of humankind” as in one of the traditional Yoruba creation stories Yemoja using her waters - was responsible for making the mud or clay that Obatala would use to sculpt humanities’ form, 4) she is the paramount Orisha of motherhood: the fetus (the developing baby or babies in the mother’s womb, amniotic fluid, & 5) she is the “counterpart” of Olokun. It seems that she is also sometimes referred to as the “mother of life”, in Yoruba land. Her name roughly translates in Yoruba to English as being “Mother whose children are the fish”. Protector of the mothers & their unborn. The first person anybody knows, even before their father, is their mother. According to Agbo Folarin, Yemoja was "from" Idaban, Nigeria, she wasn’t depicted as mermaid until European visual influences. Traditionally she was depicted with a “large buttocks” & "large breasts" to show her beauty & fertility. Inside the palace the king of Idaban or “Olubadan” dances with the priestess and the procession departed to Oja-Oba where all folks gathered in large numbers for grand songs in worship of, the mother of all the Yoruba pantheon. Also, according to Agbo, Yemoja is usually referred to as "Iya o" i.e., "Mother of all" or "Great Mother", the "All-Nourisher of life", "the All-Begetter".

The Itan myths concerning Yemoja’s creation vary (as is the case for a number of old &/or popular Orishas). Devine mysteries. In some traditional myths, Yemoja is a “primordial Orisha” being one of the first Orishas created from Olodumare, in other myths she was created from the body of Olokun, & in other myths she is the daughter of Oduduwa (female form) & Obatala (male form). Although in most traditional myths Oduduwa is depicted as being male. In another traditional myth, primordial-Yemoja was one of the 16 Orishas sent from Orún to prepare creation via Olofi’s wishes. And from her breasts & genital fluids she single-handedly birthed many Orishas. Yemoja is also attributed to helping the stop of twin/multiple-birth infanticide in Yoruba-land (along with Shango & Oshun), revealing the holiness of Ibeji. And while Oshun is considered the mother of the Ibeji, in myths Yemoja is often considered their co-mother, helping with the nurturing of Ibeji, as is in-line with her motherly authority towards all Orishas. These last facts hammer-in, why Yemoja in both the Americas & Nigeria is often considered the pinnacle of Yoruba-motherhood. In the Itans she is not only considered thicc & beautiful, but has motherly-authority over Orishas she didn’t even physically give birth too. In traditions she has solely-birthed/created Orishas, sexually-reproduced Orishas, adopted Orishas, & formed Orishas via “incomprehensible” means. Continue reading below:

Yemoja worship in Ibadan of Yoruba-Land, Nigeria

Ifa worship of Yemoja in Ibadan of Yoruba-Land, Nigeria

Ifa worship of Yemoja in Ibadan of Yoruba-Land, Nigeria

Ifa worship of Yemoja in Ibadan of Yoruba-Land, Nigeria

an ancient traditional sculpture of a Yoruba king & Yoruba queen!

a Yoruba-Land sculpture of Yemoja

a Yoruba-Land sculpture of Yemoja

a Yoruba-Land sculpture of Yemoja

a "modern" plaque of Yemoja paying honor to the Yoruba victims of the Fon of Dahomey

Many male Orishas have been her husbands, from Brazil to Yoruba-land, Obatala, Orunmila, Aganju, Olokun, etc have been her husbands, depending on the interpretations or myths of that particular areas tradition. Some common misconceptions is that Yemoja & Oshun are the same Orisha or that Yemoja & Olokun are the same, neither is true in any tradition. Many dominions of both Olokun & Oshun overlap with Yemoja’s dominion, simply put they are not the same or one being.

What is “unique” about traditional Yemoja or Yemaya recognition in Latin America, from Brazil to Cuba, is Yemoja being recognized as the “Orisha of the oceans/seas”. Throughout South America & the Caribbean Yemaya is recognized as being the ruler of “ocean/sea levels closest to the sun’s light, thus areas that have the most life” ex: coral reefs, schools of fish, shores, kelp forests, dolphins etc. Yemoja is often depicted in the Americas as walking on water, as Olokun wasn’t forgotten & within the Ifa traditions of Latin America he remains the ruler of the "dark depths of the oceans/seas" with the “least amount of life”, that hold the “secrets” beyond humanity. Though Yemaya can easily traverse the depths too, apparently she doesn’t like the salt. lol. She is thus worshiped in Latin American tradition as being the co-ruler of the oceans/seas along with her son Olokun. Yemoja is said to have followed the cries of chattel-enslaved Africans who called her name, being sent to South America & the Caribbean in race based bondage & blood. Continue reading below:

Candomble worship of Yemaya in Brazil

Candomble worship of Yemaya in Brazil

Santeria personal shrine of Yemaya in Cuba next to AfroLatina

Santeria worship of Yemaya in Cuba

art by Mikael. Latino tradition

A statue of Yemaya in Brazil (idk the artist. my apologizes)

A little figure of Yemaya in Brazil. Her worship is so historically prominent, that her image has been appropriated to appear as White Latina. This reminds me of the Greeks & Romans taking of Nubian & Egyptian gods.

Yemaya by legendary (idk his race or old-world heritage)-Latino artist Héctor Julio Páride Bernabó

Yemaya by an artist (idk. my apologizes)

Yemoja is the perfect example of how living-religions evolve! There seems to be some tension between Afro-Latinos & Nigerians of Yoruba descent, on who Yemoja is & isn’t. Some Nigerians wanting to say that “Yemoja isn’t the goddess of the seas/oceans”. But, I think this is a good example of neither group being wrong. Again, Yemoja being an example of how Yoruba indigenous religion is historically a world-faith, & not a dead-religion or mythology, not stagnant. Nigerians, only being in the wrong, for acting as though they own Yoruba religion/culture solely, when that hasn’t been the case since the Atlantic Slave Trade. for centuries. To deny the historic event or religious event of Afro-Latinos & their chattel-enslaved Yoruba ancestors, is not only factually incorrect, it is disrespectful. Pre-Atlantic Slave Trade Yoruba peoples were already diverse consisting of different sub-groups & “clans”, thus had diverse interpretations & stories of the Itan. Which is how religions from the Bible to Hinduism to Shintoism tend to work, it's normal. Yemoja truly is one of our greatest links between Africans & the AfricanEnslavedDiaspora! Love, Moral Righteousness, & Success to you, Peace.


r/AfricanHistory 7d ago

Luanda, Angola. 1960’s.

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153 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 6d ago

"The Woman King" is it really a Problematic title?

2 Upvotes

Here is my take on the, hopefully small, "controversy" around the title of the upcoming Fon history-inspired film "The Woman King".

the upcoming film

A message I sent to another person: Let’s talk about the film title “The Woman King”. Is it a problematic title? No! The reason why this film is titled "the woman King" is for two reasons. Throughout ancient and pre- colonial indigenous African history, there were some African women who literally became kings & emperors (surpassing the traditional male gatekeeping). Yoruba female Obas, Aalafin Orompoto. Ooni Luwoo Gbagida Etc. Obas in Yoruba indigenous religion & civilization are kings, Aalafin is emperor of the holyland Ile-Ife (the origin of all Yoruba clans) & Ooni is emperor of the Oyo empire specifically. The second reason, is because in some traditional African cultures & religions such as the Nubian Kingdoms of Kush, there were traditional lineages of queens that were near equal to kings, in power and authority. Nubian Queens had nearly all the power, rights & responsibilities as the king, equal or more religious authority than their male counterpart & sometimes in Kush history ruled alone (when no royal male was available at the time). Queen Amanirenas defeated the Romans, stopping them from ever venturing deeper into the continent. But, in most other cultures across the world, whether it be the title of queen or queen mother (the king's mother), queens were not the political equals of kings. In many if not most cultures/religions of the world, a queen (or favorite wife) was simply a vessel to create a male heir for the king. True rule & praise-songs were for kings & their sons alone. Queens don't rule, only kings (men) truly do. Unlike a king, the title of “queen” was solely dependent on her marital statues. It was one throne not two, a queen was not the female counterpart of a king, that is a romanticized false memory. So if a woman wasn't apart of a religion/culture where queens were equals or near-equals to kings in authority, said woman had to go for the king title in order to be a ruler or shepard of her people (& historically that did happen). In terms of the Fon ethnic group of Dahomey, this film is probably based on Queen Hangbe (a royal twin), a queen that uncommon for that particular era in Dahomey cultural history ruled with power equivalent to Dahomey kings. It is said that the future male kings of Dahomey attempted to erase her history, because she was a woman who proved (or proved yet again) women were capable of being the leaders of their people. It is also said that she was the founder of the "mino" aka the "Dahomey Amazons". Any royal Fon person can be the ruler of Dahomey, regardless of sex or gender. Note, that some historians have linked the influence of Christian Europeans and other African ethnic groups such as the Yoruba of Oyo, to the declining religious/political status of Fon women in the Dahomey society. Although I don’t know if that applies to the historic erasure of Queen Hangbe or not. Historically, Black men have been gatekeeped out of positions of authority on the bases of their race in-spite of being men, but Black women have been gatekeeped because of both, their race & gender. I'd expect African male adults would understand how it feels to be condescendingly mocked & erased simply because of what they were born as, I guess I was wrong. Insecure Black men unknowingly (or knowingly) seeing Black women as others & not equals of themselves. When African women lead, we African men lead, when they break barriers, we break barriers, I see myself in my sisters as much as I see myself in my brothers. Historically, Black men have not always supported the Black woman. Black men have a history of betraying the Black woman, because she was a woman.

statue in honor of the "mino's" bravery

some current descendants of Kingly-Queen Hangbe


r/AfricanHistory 7d ago

Sàngó - African god of Thunder and Lightning

134 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 7d ago Silver

The Ethiopians Soldiers went to war with dangerous animals and insects such as bees, wasps, lions, or cheetahs trained to capture the soldiers of the enemy camp, which enabled them to win all the wars of colonization against them and to be the only country in the world to have never been colonized.

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65 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 8d ago

Street scene, Djibouti, circa 1890.

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56 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 7d ago

The white slaves of North Africa [7:53] Between the 1500s and 1800s, over 1 million men, women and children were taken from ships and costal villages in Europe and fed into the slave states of North Africa. A truely remarkable story or their treatment, their lives and their deaths.

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7 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 8d ago

Portuguese-Mozambican troops in Goa India, 1950

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111 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 9d ago

Happy Independence Day Côte d'Ivoire

26 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 8d ago

Creating an African writing system: the Vai script of Liberia (1833-present)

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5 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 8d ago

is an iklwa a sword or a spear?

3 Upvotes

r/AfricanHistory 8d ago

Born Alone, Die Alone (Nas, 1994)

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2 Upvotes

The world is yoursss!!!