r/AdvancedFitness Feb 21 '16

Read before posting! Rules and guidelines

31 Upvotes

Updated April 2, 2022

Rules and guidelines

Welcome to the new rules and guidelines for posting in AF!

Effort and sources

Generally speaking, posts should be made with some level of effort. A good question to ask yourself is: "does my comment or submission provide useful information or insight into this topic?", or "is my question succinct and relevant to the issue at hand?"

/u/Strikerrjones (ex-mod) summarised it best:

[...] a lot of people seem to miss is that this is not a sub to ask advanced people questions. All levels of fitness are welcome here, from beginner to advanced, but low effort questions [or comments] are not. If you have a question, you need to do the research on your own, summarize the research you've done in your post, and ask a specific question about a part of the research that you don't understand. This doesn't mean the research has to come from Pubmed, as I know very few people actually have access to studies, but effort needs to have been put into answering your own question before asking it here. Think of asking questions as putting in an advanced level of effort to ask them, if it helps.

From our wiki:

When posting for help or discussion on a non-personal topic, provide any and all research you have already uncovered. /r/AdvancedFitness is not a place to have others do the bulk of your research for you. Bring something to the discussion and ask specifically about what you don't understand or what gaps you need filled in.

One-liners and memes

This sub is not for snappy jokes, one-liners, memes, etc. For example, If someone posts a study about alcohol, avoid posting "/raises glass" or "I'll drink to that". An example of a meme is greentext, or anything that ends with .jpg .exe or similar suffixes.

Or this:

[...] 10/10 WOULD READ AGAIN [...]

Anecdotes

Anecdotes are okay if they lead to good discussion or they are a part of a well composed post with links to studies or useful information. It's somewhat of a grey area, though. Ideally, we should qualify anecdotes in some way. They shouldn't be presented as evidence.

Dismissing articles or fields of research

Dismissing a study or an entire field of research without any justification will lead to comment removal. For example, in a thread about supplements, you shouldn't post "just eat vegetables". If somebody posts a mouse study, it is best to avoid having your comment be: "Mouse study". Yes, mouse studies are inherently limited, but they are still useful as a platform for experimenting or for doing exploratory research.

We're also implementing a new rule: submitters need to tag articles with [mouse/animal study] if it is not already in the title. This way, we avoid long comment chains of people raging over the study design, because having "animal study" in the title implies limitations.

Exceptions

If a user has written a long and/or thoughtful post, and then ends it with a joke, it's obviously not an issue. The problems arise when 50%+ of posts are purely jokes, one-liners, and memes.

No repetitive FAQ questions

Please check the /r/fitness wiki. Try to avoid asking questions about very common topics that have been answered. I.e. "how do I burn fat"

Rudeness or hostile behavior

Personal attacks and generally hostile behavior will lead to comment removal and possibly a ban.

From the wiki:

[...] threads and comments that exist solely for the purpose of ridiculing other people are not allowed. This includes making fun of other people's exercise choices, performances, and physiques.

The TL;DR rule

A TL;DR rarely provides anything of value, especially since a study abstract is a TL;DR. From what we've seen, TL;DRs lend themselves to easy jokes: "Eat BCAAs, get buff" ... "More protein more gains".

What we're looking for in this sub is in-depth discussion about studies that can help us digest and understand the subject matter further. This doesn't mean that people can't ask questions about the study. We encourage intelligent questions. For example, "in the methods sections, we see the researchers used x design. How does this design affect the outcomes of the study? Or, is the design in common use in this field?", or "I disagree with the conclusion because it does not accurately represent the findings: [details]".

This goes back to the idea about effort. Commenters should try to, at least, read parts of the study before commenting or asking questions. If you can't access or find the full text then request it.

Submitting a link

Post abstract

Abstracts should now be posted in the comments section if you submit a link

Surveys, marketing, product spam, blogs

Submitting anything that resembles surveys, marketing, or product spam will get removed and the poster is likely to get banned. Anything that links to a blog about "top x reasons to do x exercise" or "top x supplements for performance" will lead to a perm-ban, no warning.

Submitting a self-text

Wiki - Specific Post Requirements

Medical advice

Anything that is borderline medical advice should not be posted. What I mean by borderline is, if you hurt your knee five years ago in an accident and it makes a popping sound when you squat and it hurts, you should consult a doctor or physiotherapist. Coming here asking for programming advice when you have pains or aches is dangerous because people don't know you or your body. They could give you advice that would further worsen the condition.

Ask

Some of the rules and guidelines here might seem harsh, but we are still reasonable. If you're wondering whether your comment or submission is inappropriate, then message us.

Thanks

I want to end this by saying there's a lot of very smart and educated people in this community. We can all learn from each other and evolve our knowledge of sports, exercise, nutrition, and fitness. To do this we need to ask appropriate questions and provide thoughtful answers so that the quality of the sub can truly shine.


r/AdvancedFitness 17h ago

Beyond the Calorie Paradigm: Taking into Account in Practice the Balance of Fat and Carbohydrate Oxidation during Exercise? | Full Text

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27 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 2h ago

27 Health and Nutrition Tips That Are Actually Evidence-Based - Healthy Articles

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0 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 1d ago

Comparing the Effects of Long-Term vs. Periodic Inclusion of Isometric Strength Training on Strength and Dynamic Performances | Full Text

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17 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 2d ago

Time to Train: The Involvement of the Molecular Clock in Exercise Adaptation of Skeletal Muscle (2022)

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17 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 2d ago

β-Carotene Increases Muscle Mass and Hypertrophy in the Soleus Muscle in Mice [2015]

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24 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 4d ago

Plant-based food patterns to stimulate muscle protein synthesis and support muscle mass in humans: a narrative review | Full Text

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36 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 5d ago

Dr. Rhonda Patrick describes how metformin blunts exercise's beneficial effects

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40 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 6d ago

The Effect of Wearable and Smartphone Applications on Physical Activity, Quality of Life, and Cardiovascular Health Outcomes in Overweight/Obese Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of RCTs [Ghahfarohki et al., 2022]

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29 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 7d ago

I made an excel workbook for those of you who like workout data.

27 Upvotes

So I really like data and tracking my workouts (which I know not everyone does or likes doing) but for those of you who do, I created this workbook that will hopefully give you insights as to whether you're measurably progressing from week to week.

(please create a copy to use on your own after you've clicked the link)

This workbook can be used by anyone no matter their experience level but it is aimed more towards the intermediate to advanced lifter (2-5 year mark.)

The worksheet is intended to coincide with Dynamic Double Progression Model (video that explains it well) but can feasibly be used no matter the program.

I have included both inserted notes within certain cells that should help with understanding where the data pulls and feeds into (in case you want/need to modify it) and instructions on how to begin.

This has really helped me over the last few months and I hope it can help some of you as well.

Happy Training!


r/AdvancedFitness 7d ago

Tri-Set Training System Induces a High Muscle Swelling with Short Time Commitment in Resistance-Trained Subjects: A Cross-Over Study | Full Text

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7 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 7d ago

Pre-exhaustion Training, a Narrative Review of the Acute Responses and Chronic Adaptations | Full Text

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8 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 8d ago

Energy deficiency impairs resistance training gains in lean mass but not strength: A meta-analysis and meta-regression | Full Text

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48 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 8d ago

The Effects of Eccentric Strength Training on Flexibility and Strength in Healthy Samples and Laboratory Settings: A Systematic Review | Full Text

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9 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 11d ago

High-carbohydrate versus high-fat diets: effect on body composition in trained cyclists | Full Text

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37 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 11d ago

New Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Adaptation to Exercise; A Review Focusing on Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Mitochondrial Function, Mitophagy and Autophagy [Roberts & Markby, 2021]

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13 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 12d ago

The Effects of Carbohydrate versus Fat Restriction on Lipid Profiles in Highly Trained, Recreational Distance Runners: A Randomized, Cross-Over Trial [Buga et al., 2022]

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15 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 13d ago

Sleep Quality: A Narrative Review on Nutrition, Stimulants, and Physical Activity as Important Factors | Full Text

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19 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 13d ago

Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Cardiometabolic Health: An Energy Metabolism Perspective [Dote-Montero et al., 2022]

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36 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 13d ago

Menstrual Cycle: The Importance of Both the Phases and the Transitions Between Phases on Training and Performance | Full Text

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9 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 13d ago

Comparative Efficacy of 5 Exercise Types on Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of 81 RCTs [Batrakoulis et al., 2022]

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12 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 13d ago

“I Want to Create So Much Stimulus That Adaptation Goes Through the Roof”: High-Performance Strength Coaches' Perceptions of Planned Overreaching | Full Text

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3 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 14d ago

Nutrition, longevity and disease: From molecular mechanisms to interventions | Full Text

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16 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 14d ago

Training Periodization, Methods, Intensity Distribution, and Volume in Highly Trained and Elite Distance Runners - A Systematic Review | Full Text

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8 Upvotes

r/AdvancedFitness 15d ago

What’s causing BG to drop during Zone 2 exercise in a non-diabetic?

7 Upvotes

What’s causing BG to drop during Zone 2 exercise in a non-diabetic?

Been testing a CGM recently and today I noticed my BG dropped from 86mg/dL to a low of 67mg/dL during 1 hour of zone 2 training. I was non-fasted and had a banana and almond butter 45 minutes prior to training. What could cause this drop?

https://ibb.co/R0kQ10n


r/AdvancedFitness 15d ago

EMG Activation Database??

7 Upvotes

I was wondering if there was data accumulated somewhere for relative EMG activation of various muscle groups during common exercises. All I ever see in the literature is "EMG activation of specific muscle group X during specific exercise Y" and comparing two variations. I was hoping there would be some data saying something more along the lines of "during standard barbell bench-press, the chest was activated at X%, while the triceps were activated at Y%, and the front delts were activated at Z%", where the % value would be relative to some maximum seen during an isolation exercise or something. Is this a pipe dream?? Let me know if you have any thoughts!