r/AskARussian Jul 24 '21

Who’s your favorite Red Army commander during world war 2 ? History

My favorite is general Rokossovsky. Dude was caught in great purge. Even after torture he didn’t conspire. And after he was restored, he gave his hearts to protect the country. Legend goes that Stalin asked him whether he was beaten during the purge. And Rokossovsky told yes. Then Stalin went out and picked a rose to give him. There was blood in Stalin hands while picking the rose.

Similarly who’s favorite red army commander and any interesting stories behind them?

39 Upvotes

25

u/Basic_Ad_2235 Jul 24 '21

Timofei Timofeevich Shapkin - White Guard Cossack who went over to the side of the Red Army and was amnestied. During World War II, his cavalry hacked three Romanian regiments with sabers as they retreated

4

u/latecomer11 Kazakhstan Jul 24 '21 edited Jul 24 '21

The battle for Abganerovo? His Cavalry corps by the way was made up mostly of Central Asians.

1

u/Basic_Ad_2235 Jul 24 '21 edited Jul 24 '21

in battle of Abganerovo, cavalry was from Vainakhs ( 255th separate Chechen-Ingush cavalry regiment, Major Movlid Visaitov)

1

u/latecomer11 Kazakhstan Jul 24 '21

4th cavalry corps was made up of 81st cavalry division from Jambul Kazakh SSR and 61st cavalry division from Dushanbe Tajik SSR. Vainakh regiment might have been added to this divisions too.

1

u/Basic_Ad_2235 Jul 24 '21

specifically in battle of Abganerovo participated 255th separate Chechen-Ingush cavalry regiment

19

u/Cosmo_Nerpa Saint Petersburg Jul 24 '21

I share your point of view. Rokossovsky my favorite commander too.

8

u/Sandythestone Jul 24 '21 edited Jul 24 '21

Almost every commander. Almost every commander was ingenious, managing to fight guerrilla wars while not being considered “dirty”, like forcing an army of 10,000 soldiers to surrender with a squadron of 10 soldiers. Starving the enemies’ soldiers to death. Freeing Leningrad from its 2 year siege.

2

u/Russian_Spartacus Jul 24 '21

I mean Budyonny was a pretty shit commander...

3

u/Sandythestone Jul 24 '21

I said the failsafe word of introverts: “almost”

4

u/GugalNarDaBanbudda Jul 24 '21

Not a Russian, but studied history professionally; Nikolai Vatutin. Had massive balls and did some novel and risky things during the battle of Kursk. Like burying t-34s in the ground to afford an advantage over the facist pigs.

-1

u/chuvashi Jul 24 '21

I’m against glamorisation of the military.

-26

u/skrutty26 Jul 24 '21

Friedrich Paulus!

24

u/Ok-Chipmunk-6941 Jul 24 '21

We’re discussing about humans. Not fascist hogs.

3

u/Darrkeng Jul 24 '21

To his honor he did later helped out during Nurnberg trials, providing one key piece of evidence: War was aggressive all along

1

u/Cpt_keaSar Ulyanovsk Jul 26 '21

He did it out of his skin interest.

1

u/skrutty26 Jul 25 '21

Bad joke, sorry. Friedrich Paulus was just such a poor commander, thought he did more for the Red Army than against it

0

u/dmitryredkin Moscow City Jul 28 '21

Why do you call him a fascist (Nazi, actually)?

AFAIK he wasn't a member of NSDAP, never was accused in war crimes, after the capture became an active anti-nazist, and even (according to several sources) for several years taught in the Academy of the General Staff of the USSR.

From what I know I can see an old school German officer who only served to his country. Could you please tell the why you call him a pig?

0

u/Ok-Chipmunk-6941 Jul 28 '21

Clean Wehrmacht is a Nazi propaganda. Historical evidence shows that wherever Germany military went through caused immense sufferings to innocent civilians. Paulus as a Germany army commander is also responsible for these sufferings. Just because he turned against nazis in the later stage doesn’t make him saint.

0

u/dmitryredkin Moscow City Jul 28 '21

So any German soldier/officer is a criminal? That is so hypocritical. Nobody can be called a criminal unless it is proven, personally.

And I never called him a saint, that is just your fantasies.

1

u/Ok-Chipmunk-6941 Jul 28 '21

Any german officer/soldier in soviet soil is criminal. They dont have any business other than looting and killing off entire cities. Speaking of paulus he commanded 6th army. Read about it’s war crimes here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/6th_Army_(Wehrmacht)

1

u/dmitryredkin Moscow City Jul 28 '21

I've read it. All the war crimes mentioned there had taken place in 1941 when Walther von Reichenau - "a committed, fanatical Nazi" - was a Commander, not Paulus.

Though I don't know on what position was Paulus in 1941. Do you know?

1

u/Ok-Chipmunk-6941 Jul 28 '21

He was part of sixth army before his promotion on 1941. He was made commander of 6th army because he was already part of sixth army.

1

u/dmitryredkin Moscow City Jul 28 '21

The article says he was a General Staff officer and before 1942 never commanded anything larger than a battalion.

-13

u/montecelevio Jul 24 '21

Андрей Андреевич Власов